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5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 3i) Bach

DER Himmel LACHT
(The Heavens Laugh)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
ELSIE SUDDABY (Soprano) JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
KEITH FALKNER (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
JOHN FIELD (Oboe)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Oboes, Bassoon and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
THE words of the Cantata are as follows : —
I.-Sonata. II. — Chorus.
The heavens shont, the earth with praise exulteth,
And everything that draweth breath.
The Saviour lives I He now in triumph rlseth,
And proud hath hurst the bars of death.
He who within God's acre resteth
The Holy One to heaven now calleth.
III. — Recitative (Bass).
0 longed-for day
Come, spirit, sing with joy!
The First and Last, Beginning and the Ending,
He Whom our heavy guilt did cast to hell's grim keeping,
Today is risen from the tomb!
He Who was dead, behold, now liveth ever t
And, as the head, so liveth every member. Within His hands He holds .
The keys of death and hell's dark portal. His mantle's folds
Blood red be-dyed and torn with scourging cruel.
Today are decked with victory like a jewel.
IV.— Aria (Bass).
Prince eternal, strong defender, Lord Almighty, God's own Son,
See, Thy cross was but a ladder Set to raise Thee to Thy throne !
Lo, the piercing cords that bound Thee Deck Thee now with glory rare !
E'en the cruel thorns that tore Thee Gems of worth and beauty arc I
V. — Recitative (Tenor).
Arouse thee, then, my soul whom Christ delivered I
To Him thy homage pay I
A new life at His service lay I
Flee shun the works of darkness !
Soul, let thy Saviour now above receive thy love and goodness !
Thy conduct, as a vine, see no ill fruit
It beareth,
But e'er that it to heaven its branches reareth !
O Christian, haste, and flee hell's tomb, escape ye 1
But leave the stone, thy sin, in darkness wrapped,
Behind thee, and seek for Jesu's self alone!
VI.— Aria (Tenor).
He who would in Christ be living Must himself to God be giving, In Whose image was he made; To the skies his soul upraising, From the tomb of sin escaping, Now God's sign is on him laid.
VII. — Recitative (Soprano).
As members by their head Are guided all and led
So can from Jesus nought divide me, Whatever may betide me,
If I with Him do suffer pain, then He to heaven above will guide me.
Where sits He throned on high, my God my flesh shall see in heaven.
VIII. — Aria (Soprano).
Life's last moment, quickly come !
Close mine eyelids, in death sleeping ! Christ above will on me shine,
With the light on heaven down leaping ! Come, dear angels, take me home !
IX. — Chorale.
My course is set to heaven above To Christ I'd hence betake me. Asleep in Him and in His love, No mortal hand can wake me.
Lord Christ, fair victor in the strife. 'Tis He shall call my soul to life, And bliss eternal grant me !
The words are taken, by permission of Messrs. Constable and Co... from, ' Bach's Cantata Texts, Sacred and Seculatr,' by C. Sanford
Terry.
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata

(No. 31) Bach
'DER HIMMEL LACHT' (The Heavens Laugh)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
ELSIE SUDDABY (Soprano)
JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
KEITH FALKNER (Bas :
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ
JOHN FIELD (Oboe)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
. . . and. THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA trumpets, Tympani, Oboes, Bassoon and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
BACH left two Easter Cantatas and this one in particular embodies the gladness of the Church's most joyous festival in a truly wonderful way. As has already been pointed out several times in these notes, the Church Cantatas not only formed part of the service of the day for which they were composed, but had the closest possible relation to it... Each of the so-called Chorale Cantatas, particularly, is founded on one of the Chorales (or hymns) set down for the day's, service, and the texts are almost always related to the day's Gospel. In many cases, indeed, the Cantata texts embody part of the words of the Gospel.
This Easter Cantata is laid out for an exceptionally large orchestra,—three trumpets. three oboes, taille (tenor oboe), bassoons and strings in six parts, as well as kettledrum and rontiimo (figured bass). Bach uses this big force in the most splendid way in the orchestral introduction ; we do Indeed hear the heavens laughing and the Earth rejoicing, and the his opening chorus, in five parts, is not less eloquent of exultation.
The aria for bass, ' Prince eternal.' is bruit upon one of Bach's motives of majesty, or solemnity in illustration of the ideas called up by the word' Prince.' With the same delight in weaving his music round an idea, the last aria for soprano is a glorified cradle song with & beautiful oboe obbCgato, in which a gentle, swaying figure persists ahnost all the way through.
The Chorale at the end is fully accompanied, the orchestra soaring above the soprano voice with splendid effect.
The words are taken, by permission of Messrs. Constable and Co., from ' Bach's Cantats Texts. Sacred and Secular,' by C Sanford Terry.
I.—Sonata.
•IT.—Chortts.
The heavens shout, the earth with praise exulteth,
And everything that draweth breath.
The Saviour lives ! He now in triumph riseth,
And proud hath burst the bars of death.
He who within God's acre resteth
The Holy One to heaven now calleth.
III.—Recitative (Bats).
O longed-for day!
Come, spirit, sing with joy !
The First and Last, Beginniug and the Ending,
He Whom our heavy guilt did cast to hell's grim keeping.
Today is risen from the tomb!
He Who was dead, behold, now liveth ever!
And. as the head, so liveth every member. W ithin His hands He holds
The keys of death and hell's dark portal. His mantle's folds
Blood red be-dyed and torn with scourging cruel,
Today are decked with victory like a jewel.
IV.—Aria (Bass).
Prince eternal, strong defender, Lord Almighty, God's own Son. Sec. Thy cross was but a ladder Set to raise Thee to Thy throne
J.o, the piercing cords that bound Thee Deck Thee now with glory rare !
E'en the cruel thorns that tore Thee Gems of worth and beauty arc !
V.—Recitative (Tenor).
Arouse thee, then, my soul whom Christ delivered 1
To Him tby homage pay I
A new life at His service lay ! flee I shun the works of darkness !
Soul, let thy Saviour now above receive thy love and goodness I
Thy conduct, as a vine, see no III fruit it beareth.
But e'er that it to heaven Its branches reareth !
(0 Christian, haste, and flee hell's tomb, escape ye I
But leave the stone, thy sin, in darkness wrapped,
Behind thce, and seek for Jesu's sell alone
VI. -Aria (Tenor).
He who would in Christ be living Must himself to Cod be giving, In Whose image was he made; To the skies his soul upraising, From the tomb of sin (-scaping, Now God's sign is on him laid.
VII. — Recitative (Soprano).
As members by their head Are guided all and led
So can from Jesus nought divide me, Whatever may 1 n-t ide me,
If I with Him do suffer pain, then He to heaven above will guide me.
Where sits He throned on high, my God my flesh shall see in heaven.
VIII,-Aria (Soprano). life's last moment, quickly come!
Close mine eyelids, in death sleeping I Christ above will on me shine,
With the light of heaven down leaping Come, dear angels, take me home 1
IX.— Chorale.
My course is set to heaven above ; To Christ I'd hence betake me. Asleep In Him and in His love. No mortal hand cun wake me.
Lord Christ, fair victor in the strife, 'Tis ne shall call my soul to Life, And bliss eternal grant me I
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Schubert Concert

KATE WINTER (Soprano)
THE WIRELESS MALE VOICE CHOIR
Chorus Master, STANFORD ROBINSON
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by PERCY PITT
ONE B.B.C. listener, complaining of the quality of the programmes, gave it as his considered opinion that all music was necessarily bad music which had ' Op.' after it. Whether or not he knew what is meant by the abbreviation, the B.B.C. did not discover ; for him it merely stood as a symbol of what ho did not like.
Comparatively, little of Schubert's music appears on programmes with that hall-mark of iniquity-possibly one factor in the universal affection in which we hold him; Much of his music appeared only after his death, his brother Ferdinand charging himself with the editing and issuing of the great store of manuscripts which Franz left. So apparently endless was this stream of posthumous music that the world began to think its leg was being pulled. In 1839 The Musical World expressed its amazement thus :
' A deep shade of suspicion is beginning to be cast over the authenticity of posthumous compositions. All Paris has been in a state of amazement at the posthumous diligence of the song writer, F. Schubert , who, while one would think that his ashes repose in peace in Vienna, is still making eternal new songs.'
The doubt reflects little credit on the judgment of that day; to us it seems as though it should have been an easy thing to recognize the music of Schubert as his own. There never has been any music quite like his. No other composer has over said quite the same things, nor in the same way.
ORCHESTRA
Overture, 'Fierrabras'
9.20 KATE WINTER and Orchestra
The Shepherd on the Rock
Clarinet Obbligato, FREDERICK THURSTON
IN this beautiful little song, the 'Shepherd tells of his loneliness while he looks down on the valley below, and of how joy has fled from him. In the last verse a note of gladness appears with the thought of the coming of Spring.
9.30 ORCHESTRA
Fantasy in F Minor, Op. 103
THIS appeared first as one of two pianoforte duets, the other being the Grand Rondo, Op. 107. They were published in 1829, the year after Schubert's death, along with many of the songs. The orchestration is the work of Felix Mottl , who has been very successful in capturing Schubert's own manner ; as we are to hear it, it might very well have come from Schubert's own hands.
9.45 KATE Winter
Secrets Whither
The Inner Light (Translated by A. H. Fox Strangways)
Rose among the Heather
9.58 ORCHESTRA
' Unfinished ' Symphony in B Minor German Dances
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 31) Bach

'DER HIMMEL LACHT' (The Heavens Laugh)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
ELSIE SUDDABY (Soprano)
JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
KEITH FALKNER (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
JOHN FIELD (Oboe)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (trumpets, Tympani, Oboes, Bassoon and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
BACH left two Easter Cantatas and this one in particular embodies the gladness of the Church's most joyous festival in a truly wonderful way. As has already been pointed out several times in these notes, the Church Cantatas not only formed part of the service of the day for which they were composed, but had the closest possible relation to it... Each of the so-called Chorale Cantatas, particularly, is founded on one of the Chorales (or hymns) set down for the day's, service, and the texts are almost always related to the day's Gospel. In many cases, indeed, the Cantata texts embody part of the words of the Gospel.
This Easter Cantata is laid out for an exceptionally large orchestra,—three trumpets. three oboes, taille (tenor oboe), bassoons and strings in six parts, as well as kettledrum and rontiimo (figured bass). Bach uses this big force in the most splendid way in the orchestral introduction ; we do Indeed hear the heavens laughing and the Earth rejoicing, and the his opening chorus, in five parts, is not less eloquent of exultation.
The aria for bass, 'Prince eternal,' is bruit upon one of Bach's motives of majesty, or solemnity in illustration of the ideas called up by the word 'Prince.' With the same delight in weaving his music round an idea, the last aria for soprano is a glorified cradle song with & beautiful oboe obbligato, in which a gentle, swaying figure persists almost all the way through.
The Chorale at the end is fully accompanied, the orchestra soaring above the soprano voice with splendid effect.
The words are taken, by permission of Messrs. Constable and Co., from ' Bach's Cantats Texts. Sacred and Secular,' by C Sanford Terry.
I. - Sonata.
II - Chorus.
The heavens shout, the earth with praise exulteth,
And everything that draweth breath.
The Saviour lives! He now in triumph riseth,
And proud hath burst the bars of death.
He who within God's acre resteth
The Holy One to heaven now calleth.
III. - Recitative (Bats).
O longed-for day!
Come, spirit, sing with joy !
The First and Last, Beginning and the Ending,
He Whom our heavy guilt did cast to hell's grim keeping.
Today is risen from the tomb!
He Who was dead, behold, now liveth ever!
And. as the head, so liveth every member. W ithin His hands He holds
The keys of death and hell's dark portal. His mantle's folds
Blood red be-dyed and torn with scourging cruel,
Today are decked with victory like a jewel.
IV. - Aria (Bass).
Prince eternal, strong defender, Lord Almighty, God's own Son. Sec. Thy cross tvas but a ladder Set to raise Thee to Thy throne
J.o, the piercing cords that bound Thee Deck Thee now with glory rare!
E'en the cruel thorns that tore Thee Gems of worth and beauty are!
V. - Recitative (Tenor).
Arouse thee, then, my soul whom Christ delivered 1
To Him tby homage pay I
A new life at His service lay ! flee I shun the works of darkness !
Soul, let thy Saviour now above receive thy love and goodness I
Thy conduct, as a vine, see no III fruit it beareth.
But e'er that it to heaven Its branches reareth !
(0 Christian, haste, and flee hell's tomb, escape ye I
But leave the stone, thy sin, in darkness wrapped,
Behind thce, and seek for Jesu's sell alone
VI. - Aria (Tenor).
He who would in Christ be living Must himself to Cod be giving, In Whose image was he made; To the skies his soul upraising, From the tomb of sin escaping, Now God's sign is on him laid.
MI. - Recitative (Soprano).
As members by their head Are guided all and led
So can from Jesus nought divide me, Whatever may 1 n-t ide me,
If I with Him do suffer pain, then He to heaven above will guide me.
Where sits He throned on high, my God my flesh shall see in heaven.
VIII, - Aria (Soprano). life's last moment, quickly come!
Close mine eyelids, in death sleeping I Christ above will on me shine,
With the light of heaven down leaping Come, dear angels, take me home 1
IX. - Chorale.
My course is set to heaven above ; To Christ I'd hence betake me. Asleep In Him and in His love. No mortal hand can wake me.
Lord Christ, fair victor in the strife, 'Tis ne shall call my soul to life, And bliss eternal grant me I
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Discussion

Between
Capt. HARRY GRAHAM and Mr. BERNARD DARWIN
' The Limiting of the Golf Ball'
THERE is no golfer, from the par-slaughtering professional to the business man who plays for exercise on Saturday afternoons, who does not hold strong views on the proposal to limit the size and weight of the ball. This burning question, which has been so widely and vigorously; discussed on courses and in club-houses, in railway carriages, offices and bars, will be debated tonight by two very amusing talkers-Captain Harry Graham , the author of 'The World We Laugh In,' Strained Relations.' and the books of many successful musical comedies, and Mr. Bernard Darwin , the famous amateur golfer, who is. the most accomplished of all writers on the * game.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 31) Bach

Der Himmel Lacht (The Heavens Laugh)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
ELSIE SUDDABY (Soprano) JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor) KEITH FALKNER (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) JOHN FIELD (Oboe)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (Trumpets, Tympani, Oboes, Bassoon and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
THE words of the Cantata are as follows : -
I.-Sonata. II. - Chorus.
The heavens shont, the earth with praise exulteth,
And everything that draweth breath.
The Saviour lives I He now in triumph riseth,
And proud hath hurst the bars of death.
He who within God's acre resteth
The Holy One to heaven now calleth.
III. - Recitative (Bass).
0 longed-for day
Come, spirit, sing with joy!
The First and Last, Beginning and the Ending,
He Whom our heavy guilt did cast to hell's grim keeping,
Today is risen from the tomb !
He Who was dead, behold, now liveth ever!
And, as the head, so liveth everv member. Within His hands He holds .
The keys of death and hell's dark portal. His mantle's folds
Blood red be-dyed and torn with scourging cruel.
Today are decked with victory like a jewel.
IV.- Aria (Bass).
Prince eternal, strong defender, Lord Almighty, God's own Son,
See, Thy cross was but a ladder Set to raise Thee to Thy throne !
Lo, the piercing cords that bound Thee Deck Thee now with glory rare !
E'en the cruel thorns that tore Thee Gems of worth and beauty are!
V. - Recitative (Tenor).
Arouse thee, then, my soul whom Christ delivered!
To Him thy homage pay!
A new life at His service lay!
Flee shun the works of darkness!
Soul, let thy Saviour now above receive thy love and goodness !
Thy conduct, as a vine, see no ill fruit
It beareth,
But e'er that it to heaven its branches reareth !
O Christian, haste, and flee hell's tomb, escape ye!
But leave the stone, thy sin, in darkness wrapped,
Behind thee, and seek for Jesu's self alone!
VI.- Aria (Tenor).
He who would in Christ be living Must himself to God be giving, In Whose image was he made; To the skies his soul upraising, From the tomb of sin escaping, Now God's sign is on him laid.
VII. - Recitative (Soprano).
As members by their head Are guided all and led
So can from Jesus nought divide me, Whatever may betide me,
If I with Him do suffer pain, then He to heaven above will guide me.
Where sits He throned on high, my God my flesh shall see in heaven.
VIII. - Aria (Soprano).
Life's last moment, quickly come !
Close mine eyelids, in death sleeping ! Christ above will on me shine,
With the light on heaven down leaping ! Come, dear angels, take me home !
IX. - Chorale.
My course is set to heaven above To Christ I'd hence betake me. Asleep in Him and in His love, No mortal hand can wake me.
Lord Christ, fair victor in the strife. 'Tis He shall call my soul to life, And bliss eternal grant me !
The words are taken, by permission of Messrs. Constable and Co... from, ' Bach's Cantata Texts, Sacred and Secular,' by C. Sanford
Terry.
5XX Daventry

A Promenade Concert

Relayed from the Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
35th Season
ASTRA DESMOND (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
ISOLDE MENGES)
ORREA PERNEL (Violins)
GORDON WALKER (Flute)
SIR HENRY WOOD and his
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Bach Concert
ORCHESTRA
Suite, No. 2, in B Minor, for Flute and Strings
(Flute, GORDON WALKER)
ASTRA DESMOND and Orchestra
Aria, ' Agnus Dei ' (Mass in B Minor)
ISOLDE MENGES and Orchestra
Concerto, No. 2 in E
ERIC GREENE and Orchestra
Arias :
See what His love will do (Church Cantata, No. 85,
' Ich bin cin gutes Hirt') (I am a Good Shepherd)
My Jesus is risen (Church Cantata, No. 67, ' Halt im Cedachtniss Jesum Christ ') (Hold in remembrance Jesus Christ)
ISOLDE MENGES and ORREA PERNEL and Orchestra
Concerto in D Minor for Two Solo Violins and Strings
IN the whole realm of classical music there is no stouter witness than this concerto, to the truth of the old saying that the best music is necessarily also the most popular. Fresh and wholesome throughout, instinct with the splendid sanity of the sroat Bach, it is so full of what the ' man in the street' calls ' tunes ' as to dispose satisfactorily of the superstition that the classics are necessarily hard to understand, and that the great Bach is always stern and severe.
It is in three movements, of which the first and third are similar in manner and design, with the slow movement between forming something in the nature of an interlude. Scored for two solo violins and strings only, it is necessarily restricted throughout to the one tone-colour, but Bach contrives to vary the shades of tone in the most interesting way, and there is never a thought of monotony from beginning to end.
The second solo violin and the second violins of the orchestra begin the first movement at once with a merry hurrying tune which is really the main basis of the movement. The first violins, solo and orchestral, take it up at an interval of four bars, and throughout the movement it will be heard now on one, now on another, sometimes for a moment on all the strings at once.
The slow movement is an expressive melodious duet for the two soloists, with only slight accompaniment from the main body of the strings. Again it is the second violin which begins, to be followed with an imitation of the same tune two bars later, by the first.
All but the two solo violins and the bass begin the last movement together, but again with comparatively slight accompaniment, the greater part of the movement is a duet for the two solo instruments. No more need be said of it than that it closes the short work in the same happy spirit in which it opened.
ORCHESTRA
Suite for full Orchestra, No. 6
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

WINIFRED DAVIS (Mezzo-Soprano)
NORMAN Williams (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
HIMSELF no sea-farer, Wagner yet contrives, in The Flying Dutchman, to present a very vivid picture of the sea and ships. He had read Heine's version of the old story of Vanderdecken and was already scheming to write an opera on the subject, when he made the acquaintanco of the North Sea in one of its grim and angry moods. He has recorded his own impressions of the journey : ' I shall never forget the voyage ; it lasted three weeks and a half..... The legend of the Flying Dutchman was confirmed by the sailors, and the circumstances gave it a definite and characteristic colour in my mind.'
In its original form, the opera was ' A
Dramatic Ballad,' to bo performed without a break. On its first performance, however, at Dresden, in 1843, it was divided, in accordance with convention, into throe acts, and for many years was always played in that form. The restoration to its original design is due to the late Sir Charles Stanford and the pupils of the Royal College, who performed it at tho Lyceum Theatre in London as Wagner originally intended. The result was so entirely successful that Bayreuth adopted it for performance there in 1901, and again in 1902, on the lines originally laid down by its composer.
The overture, forming, as it does, a concise epitome of the drama, is really an expansion of Senta's Ballad, which, in itself, embodies the whole germ of the story. It opens with the wild theme of the Dutchman's dread destiny, and storm and angry seas are vividly presented; the beautiful subject which portrays Senta, announced by the Cor Anglais , is also unmistakable.
ALTHOUGH we remember him best as a composer for the stage, and one who understood his own musical public as very few composers have done, Massenet left some purely orchestral music which is hardly less popular than his operas. And among them this Suite has always hold a favourite place. Though popular in the best sense, the music is thoroughly sound in workmanship, and full of that sensitive grace which makes French music so easy to enjoy. The claim which he makes in the name of these Scenes is no idle one ; if any music was ever picturesque, it certainly is. The names of the four movements are sufficient clue to the scenes they would set before us.
5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto)
WALTER GLYNNE (Tenor)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words
THESE pieces of Mendelssohn's, written originally for pianoforte solo, are so aptly described by the name which he gave them that it is difficult to understand why the original English edition fought shy of the title. On their first appearance in this country they were called Instrumental Lieder for Klavier, or Songs for the Pianoforte Alone. In 1832 the first set appeared in London as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, and only some years later did the original German title, and eventually the English translation of it which is now so universally known, make their appearance. Another astonishing thing about them, in view of the way in which they have since made themselves at home throughout this country, is that very few copies were sold in the first years after their publication here.
Mendelssohn himself regarded them as rather trifling works, and on one occasion spoke of them as ' Animalculse ' ; none the less, they do embody many of his freshest melodic ideas, and are clearly destined to keep the strong hold which they have on the affections, not only of pianists, but of those who like them in the many arrangements which have been made of them. 4.8 QUINTET Selection of Chopin's Preludes (For 4.55—5.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.127) BACH

' HERR JESU CHRtST, AHR'R MENSCH UND GOTT'
(' Lord Jesu Christ , Thou Man and God ')
Relayed from ST. ANN'S CHURCH. MANCHESTER
I.—Chorus :
Lord Jesu Christ who Man became,
And knew Man's sorrow, grief and shame, Who on the Cross for me didstdie.
So Grace ight come from God on high. 0 Thou, our trials who didst know To me a sinner mercy show t
II.—-Recitative (Tenor) :
Yea. though mv soul, when that gread hoar appeareth, Shall fear the icy hand of death, and shrink before him when he nearrth,
Yea when my voice can nought but bitter sighings make,
And when my heart shall break : enough.
I trust in Him that saith,
' Behold, I am with theo ' ; 'twas He who died upon the Cross for me,
'Tis He. my soul to peace through tr&vai' leadeth,
And for my pardon lntercedeth. m.-Aria (Soprarw) :
My sou! shall rest in Jesu's keeping. When Earth this mortal body takes.
Oh, ring out soon, ye bells that call me
Of death no terror doth appal me.
With Jesus then my soul awakes.
IV.—Revitative and Aria (Bass):
When man at last Thy trumpet Heareth
And when the sea and land,
Yea, all that man doth cherish In ruin disappearcth,
Have mercy, Lord, nor let me perish ;
Thy servant. I before Thy Throne sha ! stand,
A guilty stnner humbly praying .. Do Thou abide with me
My Jesu ; my trust is in Thee,
O comfort Thou my spirit, saying.—
In truth I say to thec,
Though Heav'n and the earth are destroyed for ever,
So fear not, Thy Saviour forsakeththee never.
1.0, In that Day they shall not grieve. Nor shall they perish, that believe, Put all thy trust, my child, in Me;
I'or life everlasting to mankind I gave.
O'ercoming the power of death and the grave."
V.—Choral :
Oh, Lord, forgive Thy children all. And teach us to await Thy call
With gladsome heart and trusting soul; Oh, let Thy Spirit make us whole,
And give us Grace Thy way to keep, Until in Thee we fall on sleep.
(English Text by D. Millar Craig.
Copyright B.B.C. 1929.)
Cantatas for the next four weeks are :—
Match 9. No. 80.—Ein' feste Burg tst unser Gott (A Strong-hold Sure).
March 16. No. 114.—Ach, tteben Christen, Bed getrost (Beloved
Christians, weep no more).
March 23. Ko. 140.—Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers, wake).
March 30. No. 1.—Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How brightly shines the Morning Star).
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Promenade Concert

Relayed from the Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
35th Season
ASTRA DESMOND (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
ISOLDE MENGES)
ORREA PERNEL (Violins)
GORDON WALKER (Flute)
SIR HENRY WOOD and his
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Bach Concert
ORCHESTRA
Suite, No. 2, in B Minor, for Flute and Strings
(Flute, GORDON WALKER)
ASTRA DESMOND and Orchestra
Aria, ' Agnus Dei ' (Mass in B Minor)
ISOLDE MENGES and Orchestra
Concerto, No. 2 in E
ERIC GREENE and Orchestra
Arias :
See what His love will do (Church Cantata, No. 85,
' Ich bin cin gutes Hirt') (I am a Good Shepherd)
My Jesus is risen (Church Cantata, No. 67, ' Halt im Cedachtniss Jesum Christ ') (Hold in remembrance Jesus Christ)
ISOLDE MENGES and ORREA PERNEL and Orchestra
Concerto in D Minor for Two Solo Violins and Strings
IN the whole realm of classical music there is no stouter witness than this concerto, to the truth of the old saying that the best music is necessarily also the most popular. Fresh and wholesome throughout, instinct with the splendid sanity of the sroat Bach, it is so full of what the ' man in the street' calls ' tunes ' as to dispose satisfactorily of the superstition that the classics are necessarily hard to understand, and that the great Bach is always stern and severe.
It is in three movements, of which the first and third are similar in manner and design, with the slow movement between forming something in the nature of an interlude. Scored for two solo violins and strings only, it is necessarily restricted throughout to the one tone-colour, but Bach contrives to vary the shades of tone in the most interesting way, and there is never a thought of monotony from beginning to end.
The second solo violin and the second violins of the orchestra begin the first movement at once with a merry hurrying tune which is really the main basis of the movement. The first violins, solo and orchestral, take it up at an interval of four bars, and throughout the movement it will be heard now on one, now on another, sometimes for a moment on all the strings at once.
The slow movement is an expressive melodious duet for the two soloists, with only slight accompaniment from the main body of the strings. Again it is the second violin which begins, to be followed with an imitation of the same tune two bars later, by the first.
All but the two solo violins and the bass begin the last movement together, but again with comparatively slight accompaniment, the greater part of the movement is a duet for the two solo instruments. No more need be said of it than that it closes the short work in the same happy spirit in which it opened.
ORCHESTRA
Suite for full Orchestra, No. 6
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto)
WALTER GLYNNE (Tenor)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words
THESE pieces of Mendelssohn's, written originally for pianoforte solo, are so aptly described by the name which he gave them that it is difficult to understand why the original English edition fought shy of the title. On their first appearance in this country they were called Instrumental Lieder for Klavier, or Songs for the Pianoforte Alone. In 1832 the first set appeared in London as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, and only some years later did the original German title, and eventually the English translation of it which is now so universally known, make their appearance. Another astonishing thing about them, in view of the way in which they have since made themselves at home throughout this country, is that very few copies were sold in the first years after their publication here.
Mendelssohn himself regarded them as rather trifling works, and on one occasion spoke of them as ' Animalculse ' ; none the less, they do embody many of his freshest melodic ideas, and are clearly destined to keep the strong hold which they have on the affections, not only of pianists, but of those who like them in the many arrangements which have been made of them. 4.8 QUINTET Selection of Chopin's Preludes (For 4.55—5.30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

WINIFRED DAVIS (Mezzo-Soprano)
NORMAN Williams (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
HIMSELF no sea-farer, Wagner yet contrives, in The Flying Dutchman, to present a very vivid picture of the sea and ships. He had read Heine's version of the old story of Vanderdecken and was already scheming to write an opera on the subject, when he made the acquaintanco of the North Sea in one of its grim and angry moods. He has recorded his own impressions of the journey : ' I shall never forget the voyage ; it lasted three weeks and a half..... The legend of the Flying Dutchman was confirmed by the sailors, and the circumstances gave it a definite and characteristic colour in my mind.'
In its original form, the opera was ' A
Dramatic Ballad,' to bo performed without a break. On its first performance, however, at Dresden, in 1843, it was divided, in accordance with convention, into throe acts, and for many years was always played in that form. The restoration to its original design is due to the late Sir Charles Stanford and the pupils of the Royal College, who performed it at tho Lyceum Theatre in London as Wagner originally intended. The result was so entirely successful that Bayreuth adopted it for performance there in 1901, and again in 1902, on the lines originally laid down by its composer.
The overture, forming, as it does, a concise epitome of the drama, is really an expansion of Senta's Ballad, which, in itself, embodies the whole germ of the story. It opens with the wild theme of the Dutchman's dread destiny, and storm and angry seas are vividly presented; the beautiful subject which portrays Senta, announced by the Cor Anglais , is also unmistakable.
ALTHOUGH we remember him best as a composer for the stage, and one who understood his own musical public as very few composers have done, Massenet left some purely orchestral music which is hardly less popular than his operas. And among them this Suite has always hold a favourite place. Though popular in the best sense, the music is thoroughly sound in workmanship, and full of that sensitive grace which makes French music so easy to enjoy. The claim which he makes in the name of these Scenes is no idle one ; if any music was ever picturesque, it certainly is. The names of the four movements are sufficient clue to the scenes they would set before us.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.127) BACH

' HERR JESU CHRtST, AHR'R MENSCH UND GOTT'
(' Lord Jesu Christ , Thou Man and God ')
Relayed from ST. ANN'S CHURCH. MANCHESTER
I.—Chorus :
Lord Jesu Christ who Man became,
And knew Man's sorrow, grief and shame, Who on the Cross for me didstdie.
So Grace ight come from God on high. 0 Thou, our trials who didst know To me a sinner mercy show t
II.—-Recitative (Tenor) :
Yea. though mv soul, when that gread hoar appeareth, Shall fear the icy hand of death, and shrink before him when he nearrth,
Yea when my voice can nought but bitter sighings make,
And when my heart shall break : enough.
I trust in Him that saith,
' Behold, I am with theo ' ; 'twas He who died upon the Cross for me,
'Tis He. my soul to peace through tr&vai' leadeth,
And for my pardon lntercedeth. m.-Aria (Soprarw) :
My sou! shall rest in Jesu's keeping. When Earth this mortal body takes.
Oh, ring out soon, ye bells that call me
Of death no terror doth appal me.
With Jesus then my soul awakes.
IV.—Revitative and Aria (Bass):
When man at last Thy trumpet Heareth
And when the sea and land,
Yea, all that man doth cherish In ruin disappearcth,
Have mercy, Lord, nor let me perish ;
Thy servant. I before Thy Throne sha ! stand,
A guilty stnner humbly praying .. Do Thou abide with me
My Jesu ; my trust is in Thee,
O comfort Thou my spirit, saying.—
In truth I say to thec,
Though Heav'n and the earth are destroyed for ever,
So fear not, Thy Saviour forsakeththee never.
1.0, In that Day they shall not grieve. Nor shall they perish, that believe, Put all thy trust, my child, in Me;
I'or life everlasting to mankind I gave.
O'ercoming the power of death and the grave."
V.—Choral :
Oh, Lord, forgive Thy children all. And teach us to await Thy call
With gladsome heart and trusting soul; Oh, let Thy Spirit make us whole,
And give us Grace Thy way to keep, Until in Thee we fall on sleep.
(English Text by D. Millar Craig.
Copyright B.B.C. 1929.)
Cantatas for the next four weeks are :—
Match 9. No. 80.—Ein' feste Burg tst unser Gott (A Strong-hold Sure).
March 16. No. 114.—Ach, tteben Christen, Bed getrost (Beloved
Christians, weep no more).
March 23. Ko. 140.—Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers, wake).
March 30. No. 1.—Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How brightly shines the Morning Star).
5XX Daventry

CHAMBER MUSIC

THE LONDON STRING QUARTET : JOHNPEN-NINGTON(1st Violin); THOMAS PETRE (2nd Violin) ; .. H. WALDO WARNER(Viola) ;
C. Warwick Evans (Violoncello)
ROBERT MAITLAND(Baritone)
BEETHOVEN'S last Quartets, of which thiis one, represent the matured mind of the master at work upon problems of expression in which ho attained heights that no musician had before aspired to reach. We find him. in his search for a deeper, fuller exposition of his thoughts, sometimes adapting and moulding the old forms anew, and even breaking the moulds altogether and creating new ones to hold his ever- widening ideas.
In the C Sharp Minor Quartet (written in 1826 a few months before Beethoven's death), there are seven Movements, several of them containing quick changes of mood. All are to be played without a break.
The FIRST MOVEMENT (Slow and very ex pressive) is a Fugue. When this has been ex pounded in simple style, the tune on which it is based is given out by the First Violin twice as quickly as at first, and a little episode' is built up. Later, the tune is heard in the ’Cello, in notes twice as long as at first. Soon after, the Movement comes to a long-held note and a pause, and so begins tho
SECOND MOVEMENT (Very quick and lively).
This straightforward piece of energetic music is followed by the ' THIRD MOVEMENT (Moderately, fast); .which is really only a few bars in declamatory style, bringing in the FOURTHMOVEMENT (Rather slow and in a singing style), a set of Variations on'a graceful, engaging theme.
FIFTH MOVEMENT(Very quick). The Scherzo, a ripe piece of jesting, full of quips and cranks, and of tremendous energy.
SIXTH MOVEMENT (Slow). Again a very short
Movement, that says much in few notes, and goes deep.
In the SEVENTH MOVEMENT(Quick) we feel once more Beethoven's elemental power, and something' of the introspection' that grew upon him. This is big music in every sense, and perhaps in some ways music to which one needs to grow gradually if one is to get into really to grow gradually,if one is to get into really close touch with the tender, far-seeing and farther-hoping humanity of the spirit behind it.
5XX Daventry

Mr. G. M. TREVELYAN: 'A Glance into Bygone England'

A MONGST the small band of historians who, without martyring truth upon an altar of epigram, do make history good reading, Mr. G. M. Trevelyan holds a high place. He has written much on Italian history of the Risorgimento and on British history in the nineteenth century, and ho published a 'History of England' last year. In tonight's talk he will give listeners a few glimpses into the England that vanished in the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century-the England that Cobbett elegized, that Gay held up the mirror to, that Hogarth satirized.
5XX Daventry

Professor COCK : 'The Limits of Lying.' S.B. from Bournemouth

THE Devil was known to our ancestors as the -L Father of Lies, and lying has always been regarded by the moralists as one of the cardinal vices on which others turn. On the other hand, lying may be vigorously defended from the social or the worldly points of view, and some of the most attractive characters seem incapable of telling the literal truth. Professor Cock holds the Chair of Education and Philosophy at University College, Southampton, and he is qualified to deal with this intriguing subject in an authoritatively philosophical vein.
5XX Daventry

Miss LILIAN BRAITHWAITE : ' The British Red Cross Society '

ON Thursday this week tho British Red Cross
Society will hold its first flag day since 1918. The reason for this is that the great work done by the Society during the war is now being approached in scale by its efforts to cope with the new dangers ' of the road. Both the Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem have organized special patrols and first-aid posts at various danger points on the great highways, and many besides motorists, will bo interested to hear further details of their campaign against a peril that assumes greater dimensions as traffic grows.
5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Little Wortleberry holds its ' Feast' -as it always does on Whit
Monday
On this occasion we shall be there. So will the WIRELESS SINGERS
(Directed by STANFORD ROBINSON ) and tho OLOF SEXTET
5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

THE GLORIOUS GUILD of INDISPENSABLE MEMBERS
OF THE COMMUNITY will hold its
Annual Outing on Tuesday, October 23, 1928
(N.B.-The Proceedings will be Broadcast, so Members are asked to be on their Best Behaviour)






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