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BBC Radio 4 FM

Pedalling to Freedom

3/5. Lawrence Pollard gets on his bike and follows in the tyre tracks of Thomas Hiram Holding, the founder of the Cyclists' Touring Club and the man who changed the holiday for ever. For details see Monday
BBC Two England

Paralympic Grandstand

Britons Paul Pearce and Mark Farnell tackle one of the toughest events: the marathon. Day nine in Athens also includes the men's 200m final, in which Lloyd Upsdell - who won the sprint double in Sydney- goes for gold again. David Weir and David Holding will hope to have made it into the final of the 100m and upcoming wheelchair racer Jenny Ridley could be in the medal hunt in the 200m. The men's wheelchair basketball semi-finals also take place.
Clare Balding and Colin Jackson present. Commentary by Paul Dickenson (athletics), and Stuart Storey and Dan Johnson (wheelchair basketball).
Executive producer Helen Kuttner ; Editor Carl Hicks BBC Radio 5 Live has coverage from Athens in Sport on 5 at lpm
BBC One London

Children's Party at the Palace

Julie Walters , Jonathan Ross and Harry Hill head a stellar cast in The Queen's Handbag, a dramatised celebration of children's literature in honour of Her I Majesty's 80th birthday. Featuring specially written Harry Potter sequences.
Also on CBBC channel.
Writers Julian Fellowes and David Wood
Directors Claire Popplewell, Ben Warwick; Executive producer Lorna Dickinson
[web address removed] You're invited to .. : page 12

TODAY'S CHOICES
ENTERTAINMENT
Children's Party at the Palace 6.00pm BBC1, CBBC
The Queen is holding a huge 80th birthday party in the garden of Buckingham Palace when the handbag containing her speech goes missing. No need to worry, though - it's just the plot of an extravaganza being staged by more than 30 stars of stage and screen, alongside 80 of Britain's best-loved children's literary characters.
Winnie the Pooh, Postman Pat, Peter Pan and the BFG (Big Friendly Giant) will be rubbing shoulders with the likes of Julie Walters, Jonathan Ross, Harry Hill, Sophie Dahl, Bradley Walsh and four stars from the Harry Potter films, watched by 3,000 young guests. As well as the Queen, of course - enjoying the performance with her handbag safely by her side. (Jane Rackham)

You're invited to..: page 12 For exclusive video footage of RT's photo shoot visit [web address removed]
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHAMBER MUSIC

FLORENCE HOLDING (Soprano), REX PALMER (Baritone), RAYA GARBOUSOVA ('Cello),
RAE ROBERTSON (Pianoforte) Allegro ma non tanto (Not too quick) ; Scherzo :
Allegro molto (Very quick) ; Adagio cantabile (Slow, in a singing style); Allegro vivace (Quick and lively)
QCHUMANN'S song is among that wonderful outpouring; of songs that came in the first few months of his happy marriage. The theme is the beloved one, steadfast of heart and lofty of mind. THE VAIN SERENADE is tliat of a lover who, outside his lady's house, begs her to admit him, but is rebuffed. ' Please go home to bed ! ' is all he gets after standing, nearly frozen, in the icy wind.
IN September, 1827, Schubert was taken by his friend Jenger on a three weeks' visit to Oratz, where he stayed as the guest of Dr. Pachler, a barrister whose wife was an excellent musician, well known to Beethoven. The time was spent in picnics, excursions, and a round of amusements. Schubert's famous setting of Who is Sylvia ? (the mock-serenade from Two Gentlemen of Verona) was composed during this visit and dedicated to the hostess. Allegro con brio (Quick, fiery) ; Introduction leading to Adagio molto (Very slow); Hondo, Allegretto moderato (Moderately quick)
4.30 RAYA GARBOUSOVA
Selected Items
5GB Daventry (Experimental)

Shakuntala

The Sixth of the Series of Twelve Great Plays is 'Shakuntala,' or The Lost Ring An Indian Drama, translated into English prose and verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa, by Sir Monier Monier-Williams, K.C.I.E.
The Play will be broadcast from 5GB tonight at 8.0, and from London and Daventry on Wednesday night. The programme and a special article on the Play will be found on pages 338 and 339.
An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.
This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.
The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuntala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
2LO London

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

A modern Indian drawing of the Spirit of Music with the Satar, an instrument used to accompany every Indian play.
An Indian Drama Translated into English Prose and Verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa by Sir Monier.Monier-WiUiams, K.C.I.E.
Adapted for broadcasting by Dulcima Glisby Produced by Howard Rose The Persons : Story Teller Stage Manager Actress Charioteer Dushyanta, King of India Shakuntala, daughter of the sage Viswamitra and the nymph Menaka, foster-child of the hermit Kanwa Priyamvada Anasuva .. female attendants, companions of Shakuntala Riavatika, the warder or doorkeeper Mathavya, the jester and companion of the King Karabhaka, a messenger of the Queen-mother Gautami, a Holy Matron, Superior of the female inhabitants of the Hermitage Kanwa, Chief of the Hermits, foster-father of Shakuntala Sarngarava Two Brahmans, belonging to the Hermitage Saradwava/ of Kanwa Somarata, the Domestic Priest Mitravasu, brother-in-law cf the King, and Superintendent of the City Police Vatayana, the Chamberlain or Attendant on the Women's Apartments Suchaka Januka Two Constables Vetravati, Female Warder or Doorkeeper Latitha Matali, Charioteer of Indra Sarva-Damana, afterwards Bharata, a little boy, son of Dushyanta by Shakuntala Kasyapa, a Divine Sage, Progenitor of Men and Gods, Son of Marichi, and Grandson of Brahma Aditi, Wife of Kasvapa. Grand-daughter of Brahma through her Father, Daksha Fishermen, Officers, and Hermits
BENEDICTION:
Isa preserve you! he who is revealed in these eight forms by man perceptible — Water of all creation's works the first; The Fire that bears on high the sacrifice Presented with solemnity to Heaven; The Priest, the Holy Offerer of gifts; The Sun and Moon, those two majestic orbs, Eternal marshallers of day and night; The subtle Ether vehicle of sound, Diffused throughout the boundless Universe; The Earth, by sages called 'the place of Birth' of all material essences and things; And Air, which giveth life to all that breathe.

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
5XX Daventry

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
2LO London

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
National Programme Daventry

Events in England Today

Sport, speed on the road and in the air, and the departure of a giant liner on her maiden voyage, are the open-air thrills captured by the microphone and transmitted to listeners in one afternoon of record outside broadcasts today.
From Shelsley Walsh comes a running commentary on the Annual Open Hill-Climb for Racing and Sports Cars, where the speed kings struggle to cover a 1,000 yard course wit.h a. one in eight gradient in something like forty-two seconds.
Wimbledon comes next, where international tennis stars are halfway through the All-England Lawn Tennis championship.
At 3 o'clock you will hear the ceremony of the, departure of the new White Star motor vessel, Georgic, on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York : a farewell speech from the Lord Mayor of Liverpool on the bridge of the liner, and music by the ship's orchestra as she slips down the Mersey.
The scene changes to Hendon for the next relay, where the Royal Air Force is holding its ever-popular annual pageant. Stunt flights, mock battles, and the glittering pageant will be vividly described against a background, of roaring engines.

5.15 The Children's Hour
Children are invited to listen to the close of the R.A.F. Display at Hendon, where Squadron-Leader Helmore is giving a Running Commentary
BBC One London

Regional variations

LONDON On the Town
BOB WELLINGS and JOAN BAKEWELL present their observations on the world of theatre and show business in company with some of the stars. Music by the JACK EMBLOW QUARTET.

SOUTH WEST Birth of a Business
In April 1979, despite predictions of economic decline and rising unemployment, HUGH ANDERSON from South Devon gave up the security of employment to start his own business. Nineteen months after setting out he is still holding on.

WEST Blitz on Bristol: That Was Woolworth's Over There.
In the second of two programmes DEREK JONES continues the story of the first big blitz on Bristol on 24 November 1940 with the memories of those who lived through it and the use of unique wartime colour film.

SOUTH Jane Warner - Brighton Belle
When Brighton people turn to page three it's to see whether 'our Jane' is beaming at them. They've followed her meteoric development from a chubby schoolkid named Deidre Upperton to one of the most photographed topless girls in the Sun, Mirror and Star. MIKE DEBENS reports.

MIDLANDS Polls Apart
Two Midlands MPs give account of their performances in the Palace of Westminster. Facing them - political opponents from their constituencies. Presenter DEREK ROBINSON.

EAST Weekend
The who, why, what, where and when of life in the Eastern Counties including news headlines and weather. Introduced by JOHN MOUNTFORD.

NORTH Close-Up North
The second in a series of four programmes looking at topical and controversial issues in the region Presenter KHALID AZIZ.

NORTH EAST Mike on Friday
New series, MIKE NEVILLE presents his own end-of-the-week series. The pace is hectic for Mike all week, but on Friday he can enjoy a different kind of show, away from the bustle of the news. Tonight, Mike's menu includes star guests, music from LINDISFARNE, and talking points of special interest in the region.

NORTH WEST Home Ground: Cancer is Just a Word - Not a Sentence.
With BRIAN REDHEAD and FRANK MELLOR. A major campaign aims at convincing people in the North West that one-third of cancer patients are now cured. But what happens when cancer is diagnosed? Home Ground visits the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute in Manchester.
BBC Radio 4 FM

The Friday Play: Bodies in Motion and at Rest

Ed Begley Jr leads an all-American cast in this blackly humorous drama, based on the writings of Thomas Lynch , undertaker and award-winning poet, and adapted by Kate McAII.
When his father dies suddenly on holiday, Tom Lynch gathers together his travelling kit of embalming supplies and catches the next plane. As he begins work on his father's body, he looks back on growing up as the son of an undertaker in the small town of Milford, Michigan.
Director Kate McAII
Regional Programme London

'MANON'

An opera by J. Massenet
French text by H. Meilhac and Phillip Gille
English version by Dennis Arundell
(Continued on page 32)
BBC One London

Farming

Introduced by John Cherrington.

Smithymoor Farm
Frank Taylor talks to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Kent about their life and work on a small windswept holding on the borders of Staffordshire and Derbyshire.
First transmission on March 15

The Dutch would do it overnight
Each year large quantities of farm-land are eroded by the sea, and by suburbia. Kenneth Ford and Hugh Barrett have been on the north shore of the Humber where farmers think that up to 10,000 acres of agricultural land could be reclaimed from the estuary.
First transmission on Nov. 17, 1963

BBC film: from the Midlands
followed by the Weather Situation for farmers and growers
BBC One London

EastEnders

It's Mark and Lisa's big day and, as Phil gets down to brass tacks, has Pauline finally run out of time?
Episode written by Rob Gittins
For further cast see Monday and Thursday
Repeated 10pm on BBC Choice Omnibus edition next Sunday
BBC One London

Doctor Who: 3/13: The Unquiet Dead

Cardiff, 1869: when the dead start walking and creatures made of gas are on the loose, Charles Dickens proves to be an unlikely ally for the Doctor and Rose when they try to find who is behind it all. The episode is written by The League of Gentlemen's Mark Gatiss and guest-stars Simon Callow.
Doctor Who Confidential is 7.45pm on BBC3.
Their mutual friend: p16; Alison Graham 's verdict: p61
BBC One London

The Apprentice

3/12. The candidates face a mental workout as they are challenged to create a completely original piece of portable gym equipment, which they must then pitch to three industry experts. But who will Sir Alan keep in the running, and which candidate will be on the receiving end of his two most dreaded words? The Apprentice - You're Fired! follows on BBC2.
Executive producer Michele Kurland ; Series editor Colm Martin Repeated tomorrow at 7pm on BBC2 Bloq and photos: www.radiotimes.com/the-apprentice
5XX Daventry

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY v. A.A.A.

A Commentary on the Athletic Meeting by Mr. H. M. ABRAHAMS
Relayed from Fenner's, Cambridge
With Interludes by the WIRELESS
MTLITARY BAND with FRANK Foxon (Baritone) and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE
THIS afternoon's athletic meeting has more interest than the usual contest between a University and an outside club. Since the war Cambridge has supplied an unusually high proportion of athletes to the British Olympic teams, and Fenner's is now recognized as one of the most likely places to which to look for cracks capable of holding their own in the best company the world can provide.
So this year the meeting between the Varsity and the Amateur Athletic Association has been arranged as a sort of Olympic test. Cambridge are to be strengthened by the addition of some of the star products of recent years, and their team will include such famous athletes as H. B. Stallard , the miler and half-miler, D. G. A. Lowe, who has already run for Great Britain at Colombes, C. T. van Geyzel, the high jumper from Ceylon, and those two fine hurdlers, Lord Burghley and G. C. Weightmann-Smith . The encounter between these cracks and the stiong team brought down by the A.A.A. should make a most thrilling afternoon's sport, which listeners will hear described by Mr. H. M. Abrahams, himself an old Cambridge runner, and a former victor in the Olympic Game?, an article by whom on this afternoon's meeting will be found on page 425.
2LO London

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY v. A.A.A.

A Commentary on the Athletic Meeting by Mr. H. M. ABRAHAMS
Relayed from Fenner's, Cambridge
With Interludes by the WIRELESS
MTLITARY BAND with FRANK Foxon (Baritone) and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE
THIS afternoon's athletic meeting has more interest than the usual contest between a University and an outside club. Since the war Cambridge has supplied an unusually high proportion of athletes to the British Olympic teams, and Fenner's is now recognized as one of the most likely places to which to look for cracks capable of holding their own in the best company the world can provide.
So this year the meeting between the Varsity and the Amateur Athletic Association has been arranged as a sort of Olympic test. Cambridge are to be strengthened by the addition of some of the star products of recent years, and their team will include such famous athletes as H. B. Stallard , the miler and half-miler, D. G. A. Lowe, who has already run for Great Britain at Colombes, C. T. van Geyzel, the high jumper from Ceylon, and those two fine hurdlers, Lord Burghley and G. C. Weightmann-Smith . The encounter between these cracks and the stiong team brought down by the A.A.A. should make a most thrilling afternoon's sport, which listeners will hear described by Mr. H. M. Abrahams, himself an old Cambridge runner, and a former victor in the Olympic Game?, an article by whom on this afternoon's meeting will be found on page 425.






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

About this project

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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