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BBC Television

Panorama

A fortnightly topical magazine.
Introduced by Max Robertson.
BBC Television

Orson Welles's Sketch Book

The fourth in a series of talks by Orson Welles, illustrated by his own sketches.
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Emlyn Williams
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have with him if he were condemned to spend the rest of his life on a desert island
Programme produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Television

Orson Welles's Sketch Book

The fifth in a series of talks by Orson Welles, illustrated by his own sketches.
BBC Television

Orson Welles's Sketch Book

The sixth and last in the series of talks by Orson Welles.
BBC Television

Cities of Europe: 7: London

The last film in the series specially produced for the Television Continental Exchange of programmes.
This film, entitled "We Live By the River", is the BBC's contribution.
See facing page
BBC Television

Zoo Quest to West Africa

Written and produced by David Attenborough.
A film.
Last year an expedition sponsored jointly by the London Zoo and the Television Service spent three months in Sierra Leone in search of rare animals. This film, telling the story of the expedition, is compiled from sequences previously televised in December and January.
BBC Television

Television Goes Flying

Airborne with the Royal Air Force
The first of several visits to R.A.F. Station, Watton, where live outside broadcast cameras for the first time join the crew of a Varsity aircraft from take-off to touch-down during a routine R.A.F. training flight.
(With the co-operation of the Air Ministry and the Royal Air Force Station, Watton)
See page 15
Light Programme

MEET MARY PICKFORD AND GLORIA SWANSON

When Mary Pickford and Gloria Swan son were in London at the same time earlier this year, Robert Gladwell went to meet them. He asked them similar questions, and this programme combines the replies of two of the greatest stars in half a century of film making.
Introduced by Robert Gladwell
Special music played by Arthur Dulay
BBC Television

In Town Tonight

Interesting people who are In Town Tonight interviewed by John Ellison.

(Simultaneous broadcast with the London, Midland, North, and West of England Home Services)
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH ART

by Nikolaus Pevsner
2-Hogarth and Observed Life
Hogarth declared himself a ' Britophil ' and regarded foreigners as * interlopers.' His work illustrates, in Dr. Pevsner's view, several of the strongest and most enduring of English characteristics. He was intent upon the vivid reporting of what the eye had seen, and with it, to preach a sermon.
The English interest in narrative, fact, and detail, is contrasted with the Continental ' grand manner,' whether expressed in allegory or large religious * pictures. This interest has persisted certainly since the Early Middle Ages, when English artists working in wood, stone, and embroidery, produced work of a kind and quality not found elsewhere.
Next week: Reynolds and Detachment
These lectures will be printed in ' The Listener '
BBC Television

In Town Tonight

Interesting people who are In Town Tonight interviewed by John Ellison.
(Simultaneous broadcast with the London, Midland, North, and West of England Home Services)
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH ART

by Nikolaus Pevsner
3-Reynolds and Detachment
Sir Joshua Reynolds 's discourses to students of the Royal Academy express a doctrine which he himself never followed. Young painters, he said, were to study and imitate the antique and the historical, however wearisome this might seem at first, and thus avoid the vulgarity of the faithful portrait. Dr. Pevsner, finds the discrepancy between precept and practice profoundly English.
These lectures will be printed in ' The Listener '
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH ART

by Nikolaus Pevsner
4-Perpendieular England
The perpendicular style of English architecture is unknown elsewhere. Dr. Pevsner suggests that it illustrates several aspects of English character. It offers a solution to the builder's problems but it is a solution marked by rationality rather than poetic imagination and it does not set out to express a sense of mystery.
The building is designed upon a grid; part is added to part, squarely. Decoration is by repetitive pattern, sometimes sculptural, as in the great screen wall of Lincoln Cathedral, sometimes in diapers which could be extended indefinitely, and the building is not conceived as one construction kneaded together and completed.
\ Dr. Pevsner suggests that this lack of plastic development is also evident in English sculpture and he finds in it an English ' principle of insubordination.'
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH ART

by Nikolaus Pevsner
6-Constable and the Pursuit of Nature
Constable claimed that landscape painting is a branch of natural philosophy. Dr. Pevsner finds in this remark another instance of the English genius for rational observation. But now observation is directed upon nature, not upon man. Thomas Girtin, Crome, and Constable in their landscape painting ' led Europe away from man towards atmosphere '—their searching naturalism is into sky and air.
The psychological setting for their work is the passion, developed in the eighteenth century, of the English gentleman for the English landscape garden, which Dr. Pevsner holds to be ' the most influential of all English innovations in art.'
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH ART

by Nikolaus Pevsner
7-The Genius of the Place
In this, the last of the lectures. Dr. Pevsner suggests that the English qualities he has defined equip this country better than any other to solve the most urgent of twentieth-century visual problems; the problem of town planning.
Pope instructed the eighteenth-century gentleman always to consult the genius of the place. If his advice can be boldly applied to the larger problem of the town, it could restore to it the variety, the surprise, and the beauty which it has lost during the last century or so. This lecture will be printed in ' The Listener '
BBC Television

Animal, Vegetable, Mineral?

A fortnightly programme in which a panel of experts is challenged to identify a series of unusual objects.
The Experts:
Professor V. Gordon Childe, Director, Institute of Archaeology
Professor Sean P. O. Riordain, Department of Archaeology, University College, Dublin
Sir Mortimer Wheeler
v. the Challenger: Narodni Museum V Praze (National Museum of Prague,
Czechoslovakia)
Chairman, Glyn Daniel, Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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