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5XX Daventry

A Recital

GERTRUDE MELLER (Pianoforte)
THE appearance of Schumann's name beside Chopin's inevitably recalls the remark
'Hats off, gentlemen - a genius.' At another time Schumann spoke of Chopin as 'the boldest and proudest poetic spirit of our time.'
Enthusiasm was the mainspring of Schumann's nature, a warm-hearted generosity and outlook which is often part and parcel of the genuinely romantic temperament. Exactly what' romantic' means, as we apply it to the whole school of music on whose behalf Schumann was so tirelessly active, alike as musician and as scribe, is most easily learned by listening to his music itself. If anybody was ever entitled to call one of his own pieces a 'Romance,' it was Schumann.
THE two tributes of Schumann, quoted above, are by no means all that could be said in praise of Chopin. He was one of the world's really great pianists, and a composer for his instrument whose niche in the temple of Fame is peculiarly his own. A master of delicate and original rhythm and harmony, a real master also of style, he holds the affection of pianists and lovers of pianoforte music even more by the fascination of his melodies. Choosing in most of his shorter pieces the forms in which something of rhythm and type are definitely prescribed, he was thus apparently facing himself with the task of saying the same thing over and over again, and yet he never says the same thing twice. Not only did he invest every new Etude, Ballade, Mazurka, whatever it might be, with an interest and an importance such as they never had before, but each one has a message of its own for us, which can neither be repeated nor imitated. It was as though he possessed that magical power, given only to the elect, of transmuting everything he touched into a unique gem, of whose production no other holds the secret.
5XX Daventry

Chamber Music

MARGOT HINNENBERG-LEFEBRE (Soprano)
THE KUTCHER TRIO:
SAMUEL KUTCHER (Violin)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello) REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
ALTHOUGH in one movement, the Trio is full of varied interest, and many changes of rhythm as well as of sentiment. It begins slowly with a theme which the violoncello has alone at first, and with which the violin answers him, and soon there is a much livelier section with a good deal of independence in the different instruments. It reaches a sturdy climax, and then we are led back to a return of the opening which is now made the basis of a new and melodious section. Again there is a moment of serenity, and all the instruments sink to a very soft tone, but the close is full of energy and emphasis, all the instruments joining at the very end to present a powerful version of one of the themes already heard.
Auch Heine Dinge (Even little things) :
ONE of the songs in the book of Italian lyrics, thia tells, with wonderful tenderness and charm, how even the little things of the world may be full of beauty and happiness. Most of the way through there is a melody in the left hand of the pianoforte part along with the one for the voice, while the right hand has a gently rippling figure.
Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen (Let us now make peace) :
ANOTHER of the Italian lyrics, this song, flowing with a very suave and quiet rhythm, as its subject demands, is a lover's plea for peace after a long and bitter cloud of misunderstanding.
Du denkst mit einem Fädchen (Thou'ldst hold me with a thread):
ALSO from the Italian lyrics, this song, in slow measure with a wayward and capricious accompaniment to its simple and melodious setting of the words, has something ironic alike in its music and its text, which it would be unfair to the singer to give away before the effective last line is heard. It begins ' Thou'ldst hold me with a slender thread and make me captive with a look.'
Ich hab'in Penna einen Liebsten wohnen (I have a sweetheart, lives in Penna):
Tms merry song, dancing along on swift steps, tells of one who has many sweethearts in different places. It is rounded off by a brilliant little postlude for the pianoforte alone.
ALTHOUGH nobody, considering the question in cold detachment, could be quite suro which of the two splendid Trios by Schubert is hia favourite, most people are quite certain, while actually hearing one or other, that it is not only the finer of the two, but among the best chamber music in existence. In the present age of hurry, when nobody has time to spare, it is sometimes criticized as being too long, and too full of repetitions. But all of it is so splendidly melodious, so full of all the grace and charm which Schubert, almost more than any other master, knows how to givo us, that few would wish to have it shortened.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Recital

GERTRUDE MELLER (Pianoforte)
THE appearance of Schumann's name beside
Chopin's inevitably recalls the remark
Hats off, gentlemen-a genius.' At another time Schumann spoke of Chopin as ' the boldest and proudest poetic spirit of our time.'
Enthusiasm was the mainspring of Schumann's nature, a warm-hearted generosity and outlook which is often part and parcel of the genuinely romantic temperament. Exactly what' romantic' means, as we apply it to the whole school of music on whose behalf Schumann was so tirelessly active, alike as musician and as scribe, is most easily learned by listening to his music itself. If anybody was ever entitled to call one of his own pieces a ' Romance,' it was Schumann.
THE two tributes of Schumann, quoted above, are by no means all that could be said in praise of Chopin. He was one of the world's really great pianists, and a composer for his instrument whose niche in the temple of Fame is peculiarly his own. A master of delicate and original rhythm and hannonv. a real master also of style, he holds the affection of pianists and lovers of pianoforte musio even more by the fascination of his melodies. Choosing in most of his shorter pieces the forms in which something of rhythm and type are definitely prescribed, he was thus apparently facing himself with the task of saying the same thing over and over again, and yet he never says the same thing twice. Not only did he invest every new Etude, Ballade, Mazurka, whatever it might be, with an interest and an importance such as they never had before, but each one has a message of its own for us, which can neither be repeated nor imitated. It was as though he possessed that magical power, given only to the elect, of transmuting everything he touched into a unique gem, of whose production no other holds the secret.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Chamber Music

MARGOT HINNENBERG-LEFEBRE (Soprano)
THE KUTCHER TRIO:
SAMUEL KUTCHER (Violin)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello) REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
ALTHOUGH in one movement, the Trio is full of varied interest, and many changes of rhythm as well as of sentiment. It begins slowly with a theme which the violoncello has alone at first, and with which the violin answers him, and soon there is a much livelier section with a good deal of independence in the different instruments. It reaches a sturdy climax, and then we are led back to a return of the opening which is now made the basis of a new and melodious section. Again there is a moment of serenity, and all the instruments sink to a very soft tone, but the close is full of energy and emphasis, all the instruments joining at the very end to present a powerful version of one of the themes already heard.
Auch Heine Dinge (Even little things) :
ONE of the songs in the book of Italian lyrics, thia tells, with wonderful tenderness and charm, how even the little things of the world may be full of beauty and happiness. Most of the way through there is a melody in the left hand of the pianoforte part along with the one for the voice, while the right hand has a gently rippling figure.
Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen (Let us now make peace) :
ANOTHER of the Italian lyrics, this song, flowing with a very suave and quiet rhythm, as its subject demands, is a lover's plea for peace after a long and bitter cloud of misunderstanding.
Du denkst mit einem Fädchen (Thou'ldst hold me with a thread):
ALSO from the Italian lyrics, this song, in slow measure with a wayward and capricious accompaniment to its simple and melodious setting of the words, has something ironic alike in its music and its text, which it would be unfair to the singer to give away before the effective last line is heard. It begins ' Thou'ldst hold me with a slender thread and make me captive with a look.'
Ich hab'in Penna einen Liebsten wohnen (I have a sweetheart, lives in Penna):
Tms merry song, dancing along on swift steps, tells of one who has many sweethearts in different places. It is rounded off by a brilliant little postlude for the pianoforte alone.
ALTHOUGH nobody, considering the question in cold detachment, could be quite suro which of the two splendid Trios by Schubert is hia favourite, most people are quite certain, while actually hearing one or other, that it is not only the finer of the two, but among the best chamber music in existence. In the present age of hurry, when nobody has time to spare, it is sometimes criticized as being too long, and too full of repetitions. But all of it is so splendidly melodious, so full of all the grace and charm which Schubert, almost more than any other master, knows how to givo us, that few would wish to have it shortened.
5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

Relayed from ALL SAINTSCHURCH,
Bournemouth
S.B. from Bournemouth
Address by the Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM Hymn 24, ' Sun of my soul' The Lord's Prayer
Versicles
Magnificat
Reading from Scripture Nuno Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn 266, 'Lead, Kindly Light Address
Hymn 437, ' For all the Saints'
Blessing
(For 8.45 to 10.30 Programmes see opposite page.)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

Relayed from ALL SAINTSCHURCH,
Bournemouth
S.B. from Bournemouth
Address by the Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM Hymn 24, ' Sun of my soul' The Lord's Prayer
Versicles
Magnificat
Reading from Scripture Nuno Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn 266, 'Lead, Kindly Light Address
Hymn 437, ' For all the Saints'
Blessing
(For 8.45 to 10.30 Programmes see opposite page.)
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
'O Ewiges Feuer, O Ursprung der Liebe'
(O Light Everlasting, O Love never failing)
Doris Owens (Contralto)
Tom Purvis (Tenor)
Stanley Riley (Bass)
Leslie Woodgate (Organ)
The Wireless Chorus and The Wireless Orchestra
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by Stanford Robinson
We know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first 'great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes. 3 trumpets and drums/ are all called on, besides the usual strings and continue.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co., I.M.
I.—Chorus: O Light everlasting, O Love never failing. Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest, Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, In our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With as Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell; O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy,
Whom God His dwelling deigns to make. He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take. Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace : His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling : how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus:
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us, Thank Him who on us hath thought. Yea, His love this grace hath brought. Peace and rest our Saviour sends us, Peace be unto Israel.
5XX Daventry

A Symphony Concert

THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Conducted by JOHN BARBIROLLI JOHANNE STOCKMARR (Pianoforte)
THIS fairy tale Opera, by Humperdinek, to a story written by his sister, was produced in the first instance without any thought of public performance, intended only for the amusement of young people in the Humperdinck's circle of acquaintance. But the world at large was not to be denied such attractive music, and the Opera has long since won a world-wide popularity. It ia a favourite alike with young people, to whom it is no more than a beloved tale presented in a new and charming guise, and with the most enlightened musicians, who recognize it as a masterpiece of art. It makes use in the most skilful and fascinating way of actual German Folk tunes, and its melodies throughout are of the simplest and most immediately pleasing order. The Overture begins with the Evening Prayer which the Children sing before lying down to sleep in the woods, the prayer in which they ask for fourteen angels to watch over them till morning :—
' Two at my head to guard my thoughts
Two at my feet to guide my steps,
Two on my left to watch my heart,' and so on. Then there breaks in the stirring music of the witch and her gingerbread house ; the merrymaking of the children is heard, too, and the song of thanksgiving at their deliverance from the-witch's spell ; but the music of the Prayer dominates most of the Overture, and it is welded with the other tunes in the most cunning way.
JOHANNE STOCKMARR
Pianoforte Concerto in B Flat Minor Tchaikovsky
TCHAIKOVSKY'S first Pianoforte Concerto was dedicated originally to Nicolas Rubin stein, to whom the composer played it before giving it to his publisher. Rubinstein's verdict on the Concerto was so utterly damning that Tchaikovsky altered the dedication, inscribing it instead to Hans von Billow, who played the work repeatedly with constant success. Ru binstein afterwards changed his mind, and had the generosity to admit his mistake ; he, too, played' the work for many years as a regular number in his repertoire.
It begins with one of Tchaikovsky's noblest tunes, given out with the whole sonority of the orchestra, the pianoforte accompanying with great chords. In one of his letters, Tchaikovsky says that he first heard this tune sung by a blind beggar, adding that in little Russia, all blind beggars sing the same tune with the same refrain. It is astonishingly unlike any tune which blind beggars ever sing in this country. After brilliant use has been made of that first subject, a new theme appears, in which the pianoforte acts mainly as accompaniment. Then there is another expressive melody, and before the actual working out of the movement begins there is one more tune, in which the soloist has a large share.
The slow movement begins, after a few intro. ductory bars by the strings, with a melody given first to the flute. The middle section of the move. ment, in more lively time, is founded on an old French song which Tchaikovsky tells us that he and his brother * used continually to troll and hum and whistle in memory of a bewitching singer.'
The last movement is a brilliant Rondo, that is a movement in which the chief theme keeps on returning after others have interrupted it. The chief theme is the one with which the movement opens.
THERE were two brothers named Mareello, both of whom were important figures in their own day, but it is the younger, Benedetto, who is best remembered. A lawyer by profession, he held several important Government posts, and was a man of more than usually high scholastic attainments. But in spite of pressing official duties, he found time to achieve distinction both in music and in literature, and his biggest work is still regarded as taking a very high place as a historical document. It consists of eight folio volumes of Psalms for one, two, three or more voices with figured bass, and sometimes with obbligatosfor violins and violoncello. The collection was held in high esteem not only in Marcello's native Italy, but elsewhere, and the whole eight volumes were published in an English edition in 1757. Ho wrote a good deal of instrumental, music, too, as well as songs, madrigals, operas, cantatas, and at least one oratorio, furnishing the texts Himself for all these last. He wrote besides on musical and other subjects and many of the European libraries have interesting MSS. of his. To us, one of the most interesting is a Cantata, Timotheus,' for which the text is a translation by Mareello of Dryden's poem. It is in the State Library at Dresden. His music was so highly thought of even in his own day that it is odd to find our historian Burney speaking rather slightingly of it, suggesting that it had been too much praised and that it was not very original. Burney was so much more often carried away by his enthusiasm that it is odd to find him at variance with a contemporary verdict which history has wholeheartedly endorsed.
There is a monument to Mareello in the Church of San Giuseppe at Brescia, recording his achievements as Statesman, musician and poet. It is almost solely as musician that we hold him ia grateful remembrance now.
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
' O EWIGES FEUER , 0
URSPRUNG DER LlEBE '
(0 Light Everlasting, 0 Love never failing) ,
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
TOM Purvis (Tenor.)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire, rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra, has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 3 trumpets and drums are all called on, besides the usual strings and continuo.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co... Ltd.
I.—Chorus.
0 Light everlasting, 0 Love never failing,
Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest,
Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, in our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With us Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell,
O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy, Whom God His dwelling deigns to make.
He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take.
Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace; His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling ; how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus :
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us,
Thank Him who on us hath thought.
Yea, His love this grace hath brought.
Peace and rest our Saviour sends us,
Peace be unto Israel.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
'O EWIGES FEUER , O URSPRUNG DER LIEBE'
(O Light Everlasting, O Love never failing)
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
Tom PURVIS (Tenor)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title.
The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be horn from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But It is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire rather than Light., and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first ' great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another - big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it. to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes. 3 trumpets and drums/ are all called on, besides the usual strings and continue.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co., I.M.
I.-Chorus:
O Light everlasting, O Love never failing. Our darkness illumine and draw us to
Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest, Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.-Recitative (Tenor):
Lord, In our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With as Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell; 0 knit our hearts to Thee : Lord, ever near us be ! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.-Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy,
Whom God His dwelling deigns to make. He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take. Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.-Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace : His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling : how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.-Chorus:
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us, Thank Him who on us hath thought. Yea, His love this grace hath brought. Peace and rest our Saviour sends us, Peace be unto Israel.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Symphony Concert

THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Conducted by JOHN BARBIROLLI JOHANNE STOCKMARR (Pianoforte)
THIS fairy tale Opera, by Humperdinek, to a story written by his sister, was produced in the first instance without any thought of public performance, intended only for the amusement of young people in the Humperdinck's circle of acquaintance. But the world at large was not to be denied such attractive music, and the Opera has long since won a world-wide popularity. It ia a favourite alike with young people, to whom it is no more than a beloved tale presented in a new and charming guise, and with the most enlightened musicians, who recognize it as a masterpiece of art. It makes use in the most skilful and fascinating way of actual German Folk tunes, and its melodies throughout are of the simplest and most immediately pleasing order. The Overture begins with the Evening Prayer which the Children sing before lying down to sleep in the woods, the prayer in which they ask for fourteen angels to watch over them till morning :—
' Two at my head to guard my thoughts
Two at my feet to guide my steps,
Two on my left to watch my heart,' and so on. Then there breaks in the stirring music of the witch and her gingerbread house ; the merrymaking of the children is heard, too, and the song of thanksgiving at their deliverance from the-witch's spell ; but the music of the Prayer dominates most of the Overture, and it is welded with the other tunes in the most cunning way.
JOHANNE STOCKMARR
Pianoforte Concerto in B Flat Minor Tchaikovsky
TCHAIKOVSKY'S first Pianoforte Concerto was dedicated originally to Nicolas Rubin stein, to whom the composer played it before giving it to his publisher. Rubinstein's verdict on the Concerto was so utterly damning that Tchaikovsky altered the dedication, inscribing it instead to Hans von Billow, who played the work repeatedly with constant success. Ru binstein afterwards changed his mind, and had the generosity to admit his mistake ; he, too, played' the work for many years as a regular number in his repertoire.
It begins with one of Tchaikovsky's noblest tunes, given out with the whole sonority of the orchestra, the pianoforte accompanying with great chords. In one of his letters, Tchaikovsky says that he first heard this tune sung by a blind beggar, adding that in little Russia, all blind beggars sing the same tune with the same refrain. It is astonishingly unlike any tune which blind beggars ever sing in this country. After brilliant use has been made of that first subject, a new theme appears, in which the pianoforte acts mainly as accompaniment. Then there is another expressive melody, and before the actual working out of the movement begins there is one more tune, in which the soloist has a large share.
The slow movement begins, after a few intro. ductory bars by the strings, with a melody given first to the flute. The middle section of the move. ment, in more lively time, is founded on an old French song which Tchaikovsky tells us that he and his brother * used continually to troll and hum and whistle in memory of a bewitching singer.'
The last movement is a brilliant Rondo, that is a movement in which the chief theme keeps on returning after others have interrupted it. The chief theme is the one with which the movement opens.
THERE were two brothers named Mareello, both of whom were important figures in their own day, but it is the younger, Benedetto, who is best remembered. A lawyer by profession, he held several important Government posts, and was a man of more than usually high scholastic attainments. But in spite of pressing official duties, he found time to achieve distinction both in music and in literature, and his biggest work is still regarded as taking a very high place as a historical document. It consists of eight folio volumes of Psalms for one, two, three or more voices with figured bass, and sometimes with obbligatosfor violins and violoncello. The collection was held in high esteem not only in Marcello's native Italy, but elsewhere, and the whole eight volumes were published in an English edition in 1757. Ho wrote a good deal of instrumental, music, too, as well as songs, madrigals, operas, cantatas, and at least one oratorio, furnishing the texts Himself for all these last. He wrote besides on musical and other subjects and many of the European libraries have interesting MSS. of his. To us, one of the most interesting is a Cantata, Timotheus,' for which the text is a translation by Mareello of Dryden's poem. It is in the State Library at Dresden. His music was so highly thought of even in his own day that it is odd to find our historian Burney speaking rather slightingly of it, suggesting that it had been too much praised and that it was not very original. Burney was so much more often carried away by his enthusiasm that it is odd to find him at variance with a contemporary verdict which history has wholeheartedly endorsed.
There is a monument to Mareello in the Church of San Giuseppe at Brescia, recording his achievements as Statesman, musician and poet. It is almost solely as musician that we hold him ia grateful remembrance now.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
' O EWIGES FEUER , 0
URSPRUNG DER LlEBE '
(0 Light Everlasting, 0 Love never failing) ,
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
TOM Purvis (Tenor.)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire, rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra, has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 3 trumpets and drums are all called on, besides the usual strings and continuo.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co... Ltd.
I.—Chorus.
0 Light everlasting, 0 Love never failing,
Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest,
Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, in our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With us Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell,
O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy, Whom God His dwelling deigns to make.
He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take.
Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace; His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling ; how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus :
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us,
Thank Him who on us hath thought.
Yea, His love this grace hath brought.
Peace and rest our Saviour sends us,
Peace be unto Israel.
5XX Daventry

A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by POUISHNOFF
THIS performance of a striking pianoforte work is the second of that series, the first of which was devoted to Beethoven's Hammerklavier
Sonata. The works in this scries will be such as on account of their length do not come within the scope of ordinary programmes. They will be interpreted by players who bring to their interpretation high executive skill.
Liszt's Sonata, one of his few works without a 'programme,' was written in 1853 or 1854, and dedicated to Schumann.
The Sonata is in one continuous Movement, its themes undergoing changes of mood and its sections worked into a whole with ingenuity and power. It begins with a few bars of slow music containing a descending theme, and goes on to a quick, imperious tune which is almost at once joined by a bold knocking theme in the bass. Much peremptory challenging music is based on . these two ideas, and then the descending. originally slow figure returns, to bring in a grandiose hymn-like tune in a major key, accompanied by throbbing chords.
Soon we hear an expressive tune. beginning with five repeated notes, singing out aloft. This, it will be heard, is an example of Liszt's metamorphosis of themes, for it is the tune we heard in the bass, in another mood, soon af ten the quick part began.
We have now got hold of the chief material-the (at first slow) descending tune, the two that ' opened the ball' so energetically, and the broad hymn-like one. Easily to follow Liszt's dealings with them only requires familiarity with the work.
Its second main division is in three-time. Here the themes show themselves in richly sentimental vein, now peaceful, then impassioned. The descending theme of the Introduction again enters, leading us to the third and last section of the Sonata. Here begins some brisk, incisive fugal work, and with restatements of the themes we know, the work moves on to its end in a blaze of excitement. Just for a moment we hear a strain from the slow section, and then, very slowly, the descending theme of the Introduction brings down the curtain on the Sonata.
5XX Daventry

Tristan and Isolda

Act II
Relayed from the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Tristan and Parsifal were both running in Wagner's mind while he was at work on the Nibelung's Ring, and in the summer of 1857 he put the big work aside, partly because he had begun to doubt whether there was any chance of its ever coming to performance. Just then he was waited on by an envoy from the Emperor of Brazil with a request that he would compose an opera specially for Rio de Janeiro. Taken somewhat by surprise, Wagner gave no definite answer, but began work nevertheless on Tristan. He has left it on record that the poem and the music were written with 'an artist's perfect abandonment in his task', and he had no doubt himself that the union of poetry and music was the most completely satisfying of any he had achieved. But some years elapsed before the opera was produced, one disappointment after another delaying the performance, and only gradually did it win its way to the position it now holds.
The story of Tristan is known to every good Briton; the germ of it is in our Sir Thomas Malory's 'Morte d'Arthur'. In Wagner's opera, the second Act is chiefly given to a long love duet between Tristan and Isolda at night in the garden of the King's Palace.
At the beginning, Brangane, Isolda's maid, is restraining her impatient mistress from signalling to Tristan until the King and his Court are safely out of reach, on a nocturnal hunt. Brangane suspects the Knight, Melot, of having arranged the hunt as a ruse, and, at the end of the act, her fears are justified. The King and his followers return to find the lovers together, and Tristan is mortally wounded by Melot's sword.
5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No. 62) BACH

' NUN KOMM, DEB HEIDEN HEILAND '
(' Come Thou, the Heathen's
Saviour')
Relayed from THE GUILDHALL
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
MARY HAMLIN (Soprano) DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
STUART ROBERTSON (Baas)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (Oboes, Trumpet and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
ANOTHER Cantata based on this text has already been broadcast. It was one of the earlv Cantatas, and this one dates from some twenty years later, belonging to that group of fifteen simple chorale cantatas almost all of which haye by now, been included in the broadcast series. The first Chorus is built up on the chorale in the way with which listeners are now familiar, and the splendid orchestral accompaniment is founded mainly on one of those motives of happiness which Bach uses so often with such a fine sense of exaltation.
The two arias, both for men's voices, are among the best examples of solo numbers in the Cantatas, and the one for tenor is specially melodious and touching. When the bass voice sings of the Saviour's conflict with Evil, the accompanment, hold and vigorous, is built up on fine of the motives of strife and tumult with which Bach sets before us the image of battle and contending forces. The Cantata, much simpler than the other on the same text, Is none the less, a noble piece of-sacred music.
I.—Chorus :
Come Thou, the heathens' Saviour, Whom the Virgin Mother bore.
All the earth doth worship Thee, God will'd that so it might be.
II.—Aria (Tenor):
How wonderful are all His ways and His myst'ries :
In might He appeareth, the Lord of mankind...
The treasures of Heav'n are revealed before us,
And man in his need wondrous manna shall find.
Our hearts it awakens and might sheddeth o'er us.
III.—Recitative (Bast):
So from His heav'nly Throne, His might and Crown,
The Son of God came down.
As man the Prince of Juda came.
Our way with joyful heart He fareth, And for the fall'n His mercy caretb.
0 glorious Light, of wond'rous Love th' eternal Flame 1
IV.—Aria (Bass):
Strive Thou, conquer by Thy might,
Let Thine Arm be strong to guide us
Stand beside us,
In our Weakness do Thou take us, mighty make us.
V.—Recitative (Soprano and Alto) :
Then evermore we praise Thy Name, Our homage to Thy cradle bringing,
With joyful hearts our praises singing. For that the Saviour came.
Nor shall we fear our darkest night, Who know Thine everlasting Light.
VI.—Chorale :
Praise to Cod the Father, sing, Praise to God, His only. Son.
Praise to God. the Holy Ghost, Now and in Eternity.
English Text by D. Millar Craig. Copyright
B.B.C., 1929.
[We regret, that an error was made in acknowledging the source of the text of last Sunday's cantata. The English version of it is by W. G. Whittaker , and is included in the Oxford University Press edition of the Bach Church Cantatas.]
Cantatas for the next four Sundays are '—
December 8. No. 107-Was willst du dicb. betrüben ? (Why should'st thou grieve ?).
December 15. No. 125-Mit Fried und Freud fahr' ich dahin (In peace and joy I now depart).
December 22. No. 1-Wie schon leuchtet der
Morgenstern (How fair appears the morning star).
December 29. No. 122-Das neugebor'ne
Kindelein (The new born babe).
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by POUISHNOFF
THIS performance of a striking pianoforte work is the second of that series, the first of which was devoted to Beethoven's Hammerklavier
Sonata. The works in this scries will be such as on account of their length do not come within the scope of ordinary programmes. They will be interpreted by players who bring to their interpretation high executive skill.
Liszt's Sonata, one of his few works without a 'programme,' was written in 1853 or 1854, and dedicated to Schumann.
The Sonata is in one continuous Movement, its themes undergoing changes of mood and its sections worked into a whole with ingenuity and power. It begins with a few bars of slow music containing a descending theme, and goes on to a quick, imperious tune which is almost at once joined by a bold knocking theme in the bass. Much peremptory challenging music is based on . these two ideas, and then the descending. originally slow figure returns, to bring in a grandiose hymn-like tune in a major key, accompanied by throbbing chords.
Soon we hear an expressive tune. beginning with five repeated notes, singing out aloft. This, it will be heard, is an example of Liszt's metamorphosis of themes, for it is the tune we heard in the bass, in another mood, soon af ten the quick part began.
We have now got hold of the chief material-the (at first slow) descending tune, the two that ' opened the ball' so energetically, and the broad hymn-like one. Easily to follow Liszt's dealings with them only requires familiarity with the work.
Its second main division is in three-time. Here the themes show themselves in richly sentimental vein, now peaceful, then impassioned. The descending theme of the Introduction again enters, leading us to the third and last section of the Sonata. Here begins some brisk, incisive fugal work, and with restatements of the themes we know, the work moves on to its end in a blaze of excitement. Just for a moment we hear a strain from the slow section, and then, very slowly, the descending theme of the Introduction brings down the curtain on the Sonata.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'Tristan and Isolda'

ACT II
Relayed from the Royal Opera House,
Covent Garden
TRISTAN and Parsifal were both running in Wagner's mind while he was at work on the Nibelung's Ring, and in the summer of 1857 he put the big work aside, partly because he had begun to doubt whether there was any chance of its ever coming to performance. Just then ho was waited on by an envoy from the Emperor of Brazil with a request that he would compose an opera specially for Rio de Janeiro. Taken somewhat by surprise, Wagner gave no definite answer, but began work nevertheless on Tristan. He has left it on record that the poem and the music were written with ' an artist's perfect abandonment in his task,' and he had no doubt himself that the union of poetry and music was the most completely satisfying of any he had achieved. But some years elapsed before the opera was produced, one disappointment after another delaying the performance, and only gradually did it win its way to the position it now holds.
The story of Tristan is known to every good
Briton; tho germ of it is in our Sir Thomas Malory 's Morte d'Arthur.' In Wagner's opera, the second Act is chiefly given to a long love duet between Tristan and Isolda at night in the garden of tho King's Palace.
At the beginning, Brangane, Isolda's maid, is restraining her impatient mistress from signalling to Tristan until the King and his Court are safely out of reach, on a nocturnal hunt. Brangane suspects the Knight, Melot, of having arranged the hunt as a ruse, and, at the end of the act, her fears are justified. The King and his followers return to find the lovers together, and Tristan is mortally wounded by Melot's sword.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No. 62) BACH

' NUN KOMM, DEB HEIDEN HEILAND '
(' Come Thou, the Heathen's
Saviour')
Relayed from THE GUILDHALL
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
MARY HAMLIN (Soprano) DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
STUART ROBERTSON (Baas)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (Oboes, Trumpet and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
ANOTHER Cantata based on this text has already been broadcast. It was one of the earlv Cantatas, and this one dates from some twenty years later, belonging to that group of fifteen simple chorale cantatas almost all of which haye by now, been included in the broadcast series. The first Chorus is built up on the chorale in the )Vay with which listeners are now familiar, and the splendid orchestral accompaniment is founded mainly on one of those motives of happiness which Bach uses so often with such a fine sense of exaltation.
The two arias, both for men's voices, are among the best examples of solo numbers in the Cantatas, and the one for tenor is specially melodious and touching. When the bass voice sings of the Saviour's conflict with Evil, the accompanment, hold and vigorous, is built up on fine of the motives of strife and tumult with which Bach sets before us the image of battle and contending forces. The Cantata, much simpler than the other on the same text, Is none the less, a noble piece of-sacred music.
I.—Chorus :
Come Thou, the heathens' Saviour, Whom the Virgin Mother bore.
All the earth doth worship Thee, God will'd that so it might be.
II.—Aria (Tenor):
How wonderful are all His ways and His myst'ries :
In might He appeareth, the Lord of mankind...
The treasures of Heav'n are revealed before us,
And man in his need wondrous manna shall find.
Our hearts it awakens and might sheddeth o'er us.
III.—Recitative (Bast):
So from His heav'nly Throne, His might and Crown,
The Son of God came down.
As man the Prince of Juda came.
Our way with joyful heart He fareth, And for the fall'n His mercy caretb.
0 glorious Light, of wond'rous Love th' eternal Flame 1
IV.—Aria (Bass):
Strive Thou, conquer by Thy might,
Let Thine Arm be strong to guide us
Stand beside us,
In our Weakness do Thou take us, mighty make us.
V.—Recitative (Soprano and Alto) :
Then evermore we praise Thy Name, Our homage to Thy cradle bringing,
With joyful hearts our praises singing. For that the Saviour came.
Nor shall we fear our darkest night, Who know Thine everlasting Light.
VI.—Chorale :
Praise to Cod the Father, sing, Praise to God, His only. Son.
Praise to God. the Holy Ghost, Now and in Eternity.
English Text by D. Millar Craig. Copyright
B.B.C., 1929.
[We regret, that an error was made in acknowledging the source of the text of last Sunday's cantata. The English version of it is by W. G. Whittaker , and is included in the Oxford University Press edition of the Bach Church Cantatas.]
Cantatas for the next four Sundays are '—
December 8. No. 107-Was willst du dicb. betrüben ? (Why should'st thou grieve ?).
December 15. No. 125-Mit Fried und Freud fahr' ich dahin (In peace and joy I now depart).
December 22. No. 1-Wie schon leuchtet der
Morgenstern (How fair appears the morning star).
December 29. No. 122-Das neugebor'ne
Kindelein (The new born babe).
5XX Daventry

A Schubert Concert

KATE WINTER (Soprano)
THE WIRELESS MALE VOICE CHOIR
Chorus Master, STANFORD ROBINSON
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by PERCY PITT
ONE B.B.C. listener, complaining of the quality of the programmes, gave it as his considered opinion that all music was necessarily bad music which had 'Op.' after it. Whether or not he knew what is meant by the abbreviation, the B.B.C. did not discover; for him it merely stood as a symbol of what he did not like.
Comparatively, little of Schubert's music appears on programmes with that hall-mark of iniquity - possibly one factor in the universal affection in which we hold him; Much of his music appeared only after his death, his brother Ferdinand charging himself with the editing and issuing of the great store of manuscripts which Franz left. So apparently endless was this stream of posthumous music that the world began to think its leg was being pulled. In 1839 The Musical World expressed its amazement thus:
'A deep shade of suspicion is beginning to be cast over the authenticity of posthumous compositions. All Paris has been in a state of amazement at the posthumous diligence of the song writer, F. Schubert, who, while one would think that his ashes repose in peace in Vienna, is still making eternal new songs.'
The doubt reflects little credit on the judgment of that day; to us it seems as though it should have been an easy thing to recognize the music of Schubert as his own. There never has been any music quite like his. No other composer has over said quite the same things, nor in the same way.
ORCHESTRA
Overture, ' Fierrabras '
9.20 KATE WINTER and Orchestra
The Shepherd on the Rock
Clarinet Obbligato, FREDERICK THURSTON IN this beautiful little song, the 'Shepherd tells of his loneliness while he looks down on the valley below, and of how joy has fled from him. In the last verse a note of gladness appears with the thought of the coming of Spring.
9.30 ORCHESTRA
Fantasy in F Minor, Op. 103
THIS appeared first as one of two pianoforte duets, the other being the Grand Rondo, Op. 107. They were published in 1829, the year after Schubert's death, along with many of the songs. The orchestration is the work of Felix Mottl , who has been very successful in capturing Schubert's own manner ; as we are to hear it, it might very well have come from Schubert's own hands.
9.45 KATE Winter
Secrets Whither
The Inner Light (Translated by A. H. Fox Strangways)
Rose among the Heather
9.58 ORCHESTRA
' Unfinished ' Symphony in B Minor German Dances
5XX Daventry

A Discussion

Between
Capt. HARRY GRAHAM and Mr. BERNARD DARWIN
' The Limiting of the Golf Ball'
THERE is no golfer, from the par-slaughtering professional to the business man who plays for exercise on Saturday afternoons, who does not hold strong views on the proposal to limit the size and weight of the ball. This burning question, which has been so widely and vigorously; discussed on courses and in club-houses, in railway carriages, offices and bars, will be debated tonight by two very amusing talkers-Captain Harry Graham , the author of 'The World We Laugh In,' Strained Relations.' and the books of many successful musical comedies, and Mr. Bernard Darwin , the famous amateur golfer, who is. the most accomplished of all writers on the * game.






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