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5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

Doris VANE (Soprano)
JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL pHERUBINO, the page in the household of the Count and Countess, cannot make up his mind, poor lad, whether he is more in love with his mistress or with the maid Susanna. He finds it impossible to speak to either of them without blushing and sighing. He has un. guardedly confessed to Susanna that he has written, poetry in honour of his lady, and the two chaff him mercilessly. The Countess commands him to sing his ballad, while Susanna accompanies him on the guitar. That is the air which is to be sung now, one of the most wholly delightful of all Mozart's seductive melodies. The gist of the poem is a request to be told what nature of thing love is, so that the singer may know whether that really is the malady from which he suffers.
IT has always been a temptation to composers to make new settings for traditional folk songs. It is a risky adventure; even when a folk song is not of itself a really good tune, it very often has so firm a hold on the popular affections that it is not easy to displace it. Indeed, sad to relate, it is often the worst tunes which are the best loved. Here are two examples by present-day composers, of old songs furnished with new music, and listeners must decide for themselves whether or not they think the modem tunes such as to oust the older ones from the positions they have held so long.
5XX Daventry

A Light Orchestral Concert

ENID CRUICKSHANK (Contralto)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE , though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early ago of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 ho appeared as solo violinist, and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubini, Rossini, .and other Masters, singing, too, as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Papageno, in the first performance of the Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838. In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his Operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on pubic affection today. He returned to England to produce it hero, and the work was afterwards given abroad in German, Italian and French, in different parts of Europe. From then, until 1864, he was busily engaged as composer and conductor, appearing with success in Berlin, Vienna, St. Petersburg and other famous centres. He received more than one foreign distinction, being a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour and a Commander of the Order of Carlos III. of Spain. The King of Prussia offered him the Order of the Prussian Eagle, but this ho was not allowed to accept. In 1864 he retired to the country, and while devoting himself largely to rural pursuits, still continued to compose and to make occasional visits abroad. He died in 1870, his widow surviving him till 1888. In 1882 a memorial tablet to him was unveiled in Westminster Abbey. He had many of the gifts which go to make a successful musician, particularly an almost unlimited fluency of melodious invention, and the happy knack of producing striking effects. His great experience enabled him to use these not only with a fine command of the resources at his disposal, but with an astonishing rapidity in production. He lacked something of self-criticism, however; immediate success apparently counted for more with him than a high standard of artistic value ; the same qualities which won him so much popularity in his lifetime are those which account in largo measure for his failure to gain a really great place among the immortals.
ERIC COATES , a thoroughly equipped musician whose hand is no less sure in music of the sternest order, has used his fine gift oftenost to give us what might well be called ' music of entertainment or recreation.' From the . scholar's point of view, his is all thoroughly good music whatever be it3 subject, even when, as here, ho chooses a beloved old tale of nursery days.
Everybody knows the story, and none can have any difficulty in following it, in Coates' music. Goldilocks, we remember, rose very early and stole out of the house on a summer morning to explore the forbidden home of tho Three Bears. Her curiosity, her wonder at the different sizes of the three-fold sets of everything, are all set before us, and none can mistake the voices of the three bears as they come back to find traces of her presence and finally herself.

ORCHESTRA March, ' The Peacemaker' - Lotter
Overture, ' The Well of Love' - Balfe
ENID CRUICKSHANK So white, so soft, so sweet is she - Delius
To Daffodils - Delius
I will bring you brooches - Anthony Collins
ORCHESTRA Selection, 'Funny Face' - Gershwin
Spanish Serenade - Scharwenka
Phantasy, ' The Three Bears ' - Eric Coates
ENID CRUICKSHANK Red is the Path to Glory - Scottish Song
A Night Idyll - Loughborough
Ecstasy - Walter Rummell
ORCHESTRA Ballet Music, 'Faust' - Gounod
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

Doris VANE (Soprano)
JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL pHERUBINO, the page in the household of the Count and Countess, cannot make up his mind, poor lad, whether he is more in love with his mistress or with the maid Susanna. He finds it impossible to speak to either of them without blushing and sighing. He has un. guardedly confessed to Susanna that he has written, poetry in honour of his lady, and the two chaff him mercilessly. The Countess commands him to sing his ballad, while Susanna accompanies him on the guitar. That is the air which is to be sung now, one of the most wholly delightful of all Mozart's seductive melodies. The gist of the poem is a request to be told what nature of thing love is, so that the singer may know whether that really is the malady from which he suffers.
IT has always been a temptation to composers to make new settings for traditional folk songs. It is a risky adventure; even when a folk song is not of itself a really good tune, it very often has so firm a hold on the popular affections that it is not easy to displace it. Indeed, sad to relate, it is often the worst tunes which are the best loved. Here are two examples by present-day composers, of old songs furnished with new music, and listeners must decide for themselves whether or not they think the modem tunes such as to oust the older ones from the positions they have held so long.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'Love in a Village'

An Eighteenth Century Comic Opera in Throe' Acts
The Words by BICKERSTAFF
The Music by Arne, Handel, Geminiani,
Carey Abel , etc
The whole adapted and arranged for broadcasting by JULIAN HERBAGE
Characters in the order you will hear them :
Country people, servants, etc.
THE WIRELESS CHORUS (Chorus Master, Stanford
Robinson)
Produced by HOWARD ROSE The Music under the Direction of JULIAN HERBAGE
LOVE IN A VILLAGE originally appeared as a Comic Opera in three Acts, at Covent Garden Theatre in 1762. The music was partly composed by the great Dr. Ame and partly compiled by him from music which was then in vogue, and the piece enjoyed a real success.
At that time rivalry between Covent Garden and Drury Lane was very keen ; contemporary records show that Arne's Opera was so popular that only on the nights when Garrick himself
. appeared at Drury Lane, was there anv audience there. No other attraction could prevail against the charm and humour of this light-hearted work.
When Sir Nigel Playfair revived the Opera and produced it at the Lyric, Hammersmith, in 1928, the munie was recast, and additional numbers composed, by Mr. Alfred Reynolds, the Musical Director there, a musician to whom many of the Lyric's productions owed a good deal of their popularity. To a thorough knowledge of the theatre and stage-craft, Mr. Reynolds unites a happy knack of genuine, natural, melody and a thorough craftsmanship in music. A good deal of his work is already familiar to listeners, and he has an assured place of his own among composers of the present day, as well as a strong hold on the affections of all who appreciate fresh and wholesome art with nothing sombre nor troublesome in its make-up.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Concert

SUZANNE BERTIN (Soprano)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, ' Tales of Hoffmann ' ...... Offenbach
OFFENBACH'S success as a composer of comic operas of that slight order for which we have no exact equivalent in this country was almost unique. His industry was also astonish. ing, and the number of successful works which he produced in his busy life is well nigh incredible. It was his ambition, however, to write at least one work of a rather more serious order,. and,he was at work on this Tales of Hoffmann when he died. It was completed by Guiraud, and produced in Paris in 1881, the year after its composer's death, and was given over a hundred times in that same year. It has over since been in the repertory in Paris, and is regularly played in most countries of Europe, even in our own.
Offenbach's music enjoyed an extraordinary vogue in this country in the latter part of last century, although, to any who know it at the fountain head, it inevitably loses something of its delicate flavour in crossing the Channel. None the less, Tales of Hoffmann bids fair to keep its hold on our affections, and, either as a whole opera or in part, is well known to the ordinary listener.
There is a Prologue in a wine cellar in which his friends twit Hoffmann, the poet, about his many love affairs, and each of the three acts is his recounting of one of them, always with an evil spirit at his elbow, somewhat after the manner of Mephistopheles in Faust.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Light Orchestral Concert

ENID CRUICKSHANK (Contralto)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE , though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early ago of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 ho appeared as solo violinist, and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubini, Rossini, .and other Masters, singing, too, as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Papageno, in the first performance of the Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838. In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his Operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on pubic affection today. He returned to England to produce it hero, and the work was afterwards given abroad in German, Italian and French, in different parts of Europe. From then, until 1864, he was busily engaged as composer and conductor, appearing with success in Berlin, Vienna, St. Petersburg and other famous centres. He received more than one foreign distinction, being a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour and a Commander of the Order of Carlos III. of Spain. The King of Prussia offered him the Order of the Prussian Eagle, but this ho was not allowed to accept. In 1864 he retired to the country, and while devoting himself largely to rural pursuits, still continued to compose and to make occasional visits abroad. He died in 1870, his widow surviving him till 1888. In 1882 a memorial tablet to him was unveiled in Westminster Abbey. He had many of the gifts which go to make a successful musician, particularly an almost unlimited fluency of melodious invention, and the happy knack of producing striking effects. His great experience enabled him to use these not only with a fine command of the resources at his disposal, but with an astonishing rapidity in production. He lacked something of self-criticism, however; immediate success apparently counted for more with him than a high standard of artistic value ; the same qualities which won him so much popularity in his lifetime are those which account in largo measure for his failure to gain a really great place among the immortals.
ERIC COATES , a thoroughly equipped musician whose hand is no less sure in music of the sternest order, has used his fine gift oftenost to give us what might well be called ' music of entertainment or recreation.' From the . scholar's point of view, his is all thoroughly good music whatever be it3 subject, even when, as here, ho chooses a beloved old tale of nursery days.
Everybody knows the story, and none can have any difficulty in following it, in Coates' music. Goldilocks, we remember, rose very early and stole out of the house on a summer morning to explore the forbidden home of tho Three Bears. Her curiosity, her wonder at the different sizes of the three-fold sets of everything, are all set before us, and none can mistake the voices of the three bears as they come back to find traces of her presence and finally herself.
5XX Daventry

'A Sea Change'

or ' Love's Stowaway'
A Comic Opera written by W. D. HOWELLS
Composed by Sir GEORGE HENSCHEL
5XX Daventry

Lenten Address

The -Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM, M.A., ' 'Teach us to
Pray-11, When ye pray Ray, "Hallowed be Thy Name." ' S.B. from Bournemouth
The word ' hallow ' means to hold worthy.
Man. according to Christ's teaching, must desire that God and all things of God bo reverenced and worshipped. Worship today is greatly nelgocted. People say thoy get no good from it.
Tonight's address deals with worship as an essential part of the life of one who prays : ' Hallowed be Thy name.'
5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

THE WESTMINSTER SINGERS THE SQUIRE CELESTE OCTET
A SPECIAL interest, although a melancholy one, is lent to the Gilbert and Sullivan operas just now by the d struction of the old Savoy Theatre.
Built by D'Oyly Carte specially for them, it was for so long their own home that the operas are just as well known by its name as by their authors'. No doubt the new edifice which will rise from the ruins will show many improvements, but for the generation which heard its Gilbert and Sullivan in the original theatre, it is sad to know that almost nothing of it remains
Jhe Pirates of Penzance, the fifth of the long series, coming immediately after H.M.S. Pinafore, was not originally produced there, the theatre having been built only in time for part of the long run of Patience, the sixth opera. The
Pirates had its copyright performance at Paignton at the very end of 1879. almost at the same time that New York heard its brilliant first production, with such famous Savoyards as Jessie Bond. Rosina Brandram , and Alice Barnett all in the cast. In London The Pirates had a run of nearly four hundred nights, and has ever since maintained- its strong hold on the affections of music lovers everywhere, or at any rate of the Gilbert and Sullivan disciples, which is nearly the same thing.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RUSSELL OWEN (Tenor)
EFFIE KALISZ (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS Military BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE, though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early age of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 he appeared as solo violinst and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubim, Rossini, and other masters, singing too as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Pagagono, in the first performance of The Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838.
In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on public affection today. He came back to England and produced it at Drury Lane Theatre in November, 1843. Fifteen years later it was given in Italian at Her Majesty's with the name La Zingara , and in 1869 the Theatre Lyrique,
Paris, staged it in an enlarged form with several additional numbers by Balfe himself, calling it La Bohemienne.
THIS was the first Ballet which the Imperial
Opera of Moscow commissioned from
Tchaikovsky. He had just finished his Third Symphony, and composed this music in the quiet country house of a married sister, working so happily that the first two acts were finished in a fortnight.
The first performance was not a great success, inadequate performance being more to blame than the music itself. Its tuneful grace and charm soon won their way to popularity, and in the form of a Suite the music has ever since held a place of its own in the affections of Tchaikovsky's admirers.
In the Ballet, the Swan is a beautiful maiden who has been enchanted by a wicked magician and who is in the end rescued by her faithful Knight. There are six movements in the Suite, called respectively :-
(1) Scene; (2) Waltz; (3) Dance of the Swans; (4) Scene; (5) Hungarian Dance; (6) Scene
5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

Doris DuTsoN (Contralto)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
COLERIDGE-TAYLOR spent his boyhood in Croydon, where his father was a doctor, but at the age of fifteen came to London to study violin and composition at the Royal College of Music. He won a Composition scholarship, and very soon made his mark as a new composer with very fresh and natural gifts of his own. He was still a student when the first part of the Hiawatha trilogy appeared, the work which has since remained the most popular, as it is in many ways the best, of his music. But even that was not his first success. He had produced many pieces, particularly in the domain of chamber music, which attracted the interest of the English world of music, and one, at least, of which was played in Berlin by the Joachim Quartet. Hiawatha's Wedding Feast was followed two years later by the second part of the trilogy, The Death of Minnehaha, and the year after that, 1900, by Hiawatlia's Departure. The work is known all over the English-speaking world, and there cannot be many choral societies which have not sung it, in whole or in part ; it is clearly destined to maintain its hold on the popular affections.
Many other choral works followed Hiawatha, but, except for A Talc of Old Japan, none has made so lasting an impression. It seems as though his music, wedded to Longfellow's verse, formed an ideal combination, such as other texts could not inspire. With music written for the production of plays, however, Coleridge-Taylor was specially successful; the barbaric gorgeous-ness of Herod, Ulysses, and Nero, by Stephen Phillips , owed a good deal of their effect to his strong and individual music. Some of his pieces originally written for such stage productions still survive happily in the form of orchestral Suites.
Three times Coleridge-Taylor went to America to superintend productions of his own music there, but apart from that, his life was in the main uneventful, and a list of his more important compositions would form a pretty complete summary of it. For a time he was conductor of the Handel Society, proving himself a more than capable chorus-master, and he was enthusiastic in the Competition Festival movement, acting as judge in many parts of the country ; and during the last year of his life he was one of the Professors at the Guildhall School of Music. His industrious and happy life came to an end when he was just thirty-seven.
The name of this Suite means simply that it is in the usual 3-4 or waltz rhythm-a measure in which Coleridge-Taylor wrote some really seductive melodies.

Three-Four Dance Suite - Coleridge-Taylor
Doris DUTSON Missing - Fraser-Simson
Buckingham Palace - Fraser-Simson
Vespers - Fraser-Simson
QUINTET In an Eastern Garden - London Ronald
Valse,'Mon Bijou' (My Jewel) - Lepaige
DORIS Dutson Gipsies - Graham Peel
Peace - Eric Fogg
Butterfly Wings - Phillips
QUINTET Le temps des Lilas (Lilac Time) - Chausson
Serenade a Columbine - Pierni
Intermezzo - Borodin
Noontide - Friml
5XX Daventry

Frederic Ranalow (Baritone)

WHILE many of the songs which wore popular in the end of last century have completely vanished from concert platform and from drawing-room, there are several by Maud Valerie White which seem destined to keep their hold on the affections of listeners and singers. And their popularity is in every way worthily earned. They not only choose poetry which is usually far above the standard of the ordinary verse which composers sot to music, but they treat it with a poet's regard not only for its beauty of sound, but for its meaning. Her settings of lyrics by Herrick and Shelley, for instance, are admirably adapted, in one case to the old-fashioned turns of thought and phrase, and in the other to the passionate sentiment of the words. ' My soul is an enchanted boat,' to name only one instanco, is a really poetic pioco of music.
A former holder of the Mendelssohn's scholar- ship of the Royal Academy of Music, Miss White is equally at home in French and in German poetry, as many of her settings of Heine, Victor Hugo , and Schiller amply testify. And she has composed in larger forms, too, although it is mainly by her songs that she has won so secure a place in the music of our time.
5XX Daventry

Excerpts from Rupert d'Oyly Carte's Production of 'The Mikado'

Written by W. S. GILBERT , com. posed by ARTHUR SULLIVAN
Relayed from Tho Savoy Theatre
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'A Sea Change'

or ' Love's Stowaway'
A Comic Opera written by W. D. HOWELLS
Composed by Sir GEORGE HENSCHEL
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RUSSELL OWEN (Tenor)
EFFIE KALISZ (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS Military BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE, though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early age of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 he appeared as solo violinst and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubim, Rossini, and other masters, singing too as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Pagagono, in the first performance of The Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838.
In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on public affection today. He came back to England and produced it at Drury Lane Theatre in November, 1843. Fifteen years later it was given in Italian at Her Majesty's with the name La Zingara , and in 1869 the Theatre Lyrique,
Paris, staged it in an enlarged form with several additional numbers by Balfe himself, calling it La Bohemienne.
THIS was the first Ballet which the Imperial
Opera of Moscow commissioned from
Tchaikovsky. He had just finished his Third Symphony, and composed this music in the quiet country house of a married sister, working so happily that the first two acts were finished in a fortnight.
The first performance was not a great success, inadequate performance being more to blame than the music itself. Its tuneful grace and charm soon won their way to popularity, and in the form of a Suite the music has ever since held a place of its own in the affections of Tchaikovsky's admirers.
In the Ballet, the Swan is a beautiful maiden who has been enchanted by a wicked magician and who is in the end rescued by her faithful Knight. There are six movements in the Suite, called respectively :-
(1) Scene; (2) Waltz; (3) Dance of the Swans; (4) Scene; (5) Hungarian Dance; (6) Scene
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Frederic Ranalow (Baritone)

WHILE many of the songs which wore popular in the end of last century have completely vanished from concert platform and from drawing-room, there are several by Maud Valerie White which seem destined to keep their hold on the affections of listeners and singers. And their popularity is in every way worthily earned. They not only choose poetry which is usually far above the standard of the ordinary verse which composers sot to music, but they treat it with a poet's regard not only for its beauty of sound, but for its meaning. Her settings of lyrics by Herrick and Shelley, for instance, are admirably adapted, in one case to the old-fashioned turns of thought and phrase, and in the other to the passionate sentiment of the words. ' My soul is an enchanted boat,' to name only one instanco, is a really poetic pioco of music.
A former holder of the Mendelssohn's scholar- ship of the Royal Academy of Music, Miss White is equally at home in French and in German poetry, as many of her settings of Heine, Victor Hugo , and Schiller amply testify. And she has composed in larger forms, too, although it is mainly by her songs that she has won so secure a place in the music of our time.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

Doris DuTsoN (Contralto)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
COLERIDGE-TAYLOR spent his boyhood in Croydon, where his father was a doctor, but at the age of fifteen came to London to study violin and composition at the Royal College of Music. He won a Composition scholarship, and very soon made his mark as a new composer with very fresh and natural gifts of his own. He was still a student when the first part of the Hiawatha trilogy appeared, the work which has since remained the most popular, as it is in many ways the best, of his music. But even that was not his first success. He had produced many pieces, particularly in the domain of chamber music, which attracted the interest of the English world of music, and one, at least, of which was played in Berlin by the Joachim Quartet. Hiawatha's Wedding Feast was followed two years later by the second part of the trilogy, The Death of Minnehaha, and the year after that, 1900, by Hiawatlia's Departure. The work is known all over the English-speaking world, and there cannot be many choral societies which have not sung it, in whole or in part ; it is clearly destined to maintain its hold on the popular affections.
Many other choral works followed Hiawatha, but, except for A Talc of Old Japan, none has made so lasting an impression. It seems as though his music, wedded to Longfellow's verse, formed an ideal combination, such as other texts could not inspire. With music written for the production of plays, however, Coleridge-Taylor was specially successful; the barbaric gorgeous-ness of Herod, Ulysses, and Nero, by Stephen Phillips , owed a good deal of their effect to his strong and individual music. Some of his pieces originally written for such stage productions still survive happily in the form of orchestral Suites.
Three times Coleridge-Taylor went to America to superintend productions of his own music there, but apart from that, his life was in the main uneventful, and a list of his more important compositions would form a pretty complete summary of it. For a time he was conductor of the Handel Society, proving himself a more than capable chorus-master, and he was enthusiastic in the Competition Festival movement, acting as judge in many parts of the country ; and during the last year of his life he was one of the Professors at the Guildhall School of Music. His industrious and happy life came to an end when he was just thirty-seven.
The name of this Suite means simply that it is in the usual 3-4 or waltz rhythm-a measure in which Coleridge-Taylor wrote some really seductive melodies.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Lenten Address

The -Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM, M.A., ' 'Teach us to
Pray-11, When ye pray Ray, "Hallowed be Thy Name." ' S.B. from Bournemouth
The word ' hallow ' means to hold worthy.
Man. according to Christ's teaching, must desire that God and all things of God bo reverenced and worshipped. Worship today is greatly nelgocted. People say thoy get no good from it.
Tonight's address deals with worship as an essential part of the life of one who prays : ' Hallowed be Thy name.'
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

THE WESTMINSTER SINGERS THE SQUIRE CELESTE OCTET
A SPECIAL interest, although a melancholy one, is lent to the Gilbert and Sullivan operas just now by the d struction of the old Savoy Theatre.
Built by D'Oyly Carte specially for them, it was for so long their own home that the operas are just as well known by its name as by their authors'. No doubt the new edifice which will rise from the ruins will show many improvements, but for the generation which heard its Gilbert and Sullivan in the original theatre, it is sad to know that almost nothing of it remains
Jhe Pirates of Penzance, the fifth of the long series, coming immediately after H.M.S. Pinafore, was not originally produced there, the theatre having been built only in time for part of the long run of Patience, the sixth opera. The
Pirates had its copyright performance at Paignton at the very end of 1879. almost at the same time that New York heard its brilliant first production, with such famous Savoyards as Jessie Bond. Rosina Brandram , and Alice Barnett all in the cast. In London The Pirates had a run of nearly four hundred nights, and has ever since maintained- its strong hold on the affections of music lovers everywhere, or at any rate of the Gilbert and Sullivan disciples, which is nearly the same thing.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Excerpts from Rupert d'Oyly Carte's Production of 'The Mikado'

Written by W. S. GILBERT , com. posed by ARTHUR SULLIVAN
Relayed from Tho Savoy Theatre






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