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BBC One London

You and Me: Animal Pets

A series for 4- and 5-year-olds, and adults watching with them.
Introduced by Anton Phillips. (Repeat)
BBC One London

For Schools, Colleges

9.35 Encounter: Germany Meeting Point
9.53 Treffpunkt: Deutschland An Ort und Stelle
10.10 Look and Read The Boy from Space:
Where is Tom?
10.35 Resource Units: Religious and Moral Education
You'll Be Sorry
11.0 Watch
Early Life
Watch Again (record REC 375, cassette ZCM375) from retailers
11.17 Television Club Pet Subject
11.38 Shakespeare in Perspective Twelfth Night
12.5 pm General Studies Have a Drink?
BBC Two England

Daytime on Two

9.0 Shakespeare in Perspective Selection King Lear
PROFESSOR FRANK KERMODE 'S view on the purpose of tragedy.
9.26 Twentieth-Century History
1: Make Germany Pay.
How the treaty of Versailles affected Germany in the 1920s.
9.48 Mathscore Two
1: Take it Away. Exactly how do you subtract 42 from 67?
And what does one million of something look like?
10.10 Look and Read, Badger Girl
2: Stripey the Badger.
Debbie has befriended Stripey the badger. But can a badger be a pet? And shouldn't the children tell Mrs Rudge about him? Written by ANDREW DAVIES With MARGO GUNN , ASHIEK
MADHVANI, JUNE MARLOW, JULIA
MILLBANK, NICK ORCHARD, KIERON O'SHEA , CHARLES COLUNGWOOD and KATIE HEBB
Assistant producer ROGER FRY Producer SUSAN PATON
10.35 Update USA 1: Great Lakes City
Cleveland, on the shores of Lake Erie and one of the original capitals of industrial America, is struggling with the problems of decline as investment for new industry seeks out more profitable locations in the south and west of the USA.
Producer LEN BROWN
11.0 Watch
Captain Cook
2: Tahiti
11.17 English: 11-13 1: Alone
Autobiography: you needn't be famous to write yours!
Producer JUDITH MILES
11.40 Job Bank
Technicians in Industry
12.0 New series
Une annee chez les Français
New French-language versions of the Year of the French series for advanced level students.
1: La reine du Beaujolais
Harvest time in Fleurie, one of the best wine-producing villages in Beaujolais, is seen through the eyes of 83-year-old MARGUERITE CHABERT.
Producer of French adaptation CAROLINE GODLEY
12.30 Life Power
A series of programmes surveying biotechnology
2: The Chemistry of Life. The difference between man-made and living chemistry.
1.0 Maths Help
For adults studying maths to 0 level.
2: Percentages
1.15 Science Topics
Darwin and Evolution
Observations on living things are explained by evolution according to natural selection. Series producer PETER BRATT
Gary Wilmot is in the market today -with Cosmo (and Dibs) BBC2, 2.0 pm You and Me
1.38 Let's See: Take Care 2: Watch How You Go
How children at a primary school in Scotland learn the basic skills of cycling.
Presenter JOHN CRAWFORD Producer PETER WHITEFORD
2.0 You and Me
A series for 4- and 5-year-olds Gary is in a terrible temper but all turns out well for
Cosmo and Dibs. The number four is introduced.
Book: New Blue Shoes by EVE RICE.
Producer RICHARD CALLANAN
2.15 Near and Far Bricks
How are bricks made and how do they affect those rural areas where the clay is quarried? Producer ROBIN GWYN
2.40 Junior Craft, Design and Technology
Up and Down the Hill Downhill
5GB Daventry (Experimental)

Shakuntala

The Sixth of the Series of Twelve Great Plays is 'Shakuntala,' or The Lost Ring An Indian Drama, translated into English prose and verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa, by Sir Monier Monier-Williams, K.C.I.E.
The Play will be broadcast from 5GB tonight at 8.0, and from London and Daventry on Wednesday night. The programme and a special article on the Play will be found on pages 338 and 339.
An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.
This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.
The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuntala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
5XX Daventry

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
2LO London

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

A modern Indian drawing of the Spirit of Music with the Satar, an instrument used to accompany every Indian play.
An Indian Drama Translated into English Prose and Verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa by Sir Monier.Monier-WiUiams, K.C.I.E.
Adapted for broadcasting by Dulcima Glisby Produced by Howard Rose The Persons : Story Teller Stage Manager Actress Charioteer Dushyanta, King of India Shakuntala, daughter of the sage Viswamitra and the nymph Menaka, foster-child of the hermit Kanwa Priyamvada Anasuva .. female attendants, companions of Shakuntala Riavatika, the warder or doorkeeper Mathavya, the jester and companion of the King Karabhaka, a messenger of the Queen-mother Gautami, a Holy Matron, Superior of the female inhabitants of the Hermitage Kanwa, Chief of the Hermits, foster-father of Shakuntala Sarngarava Two Brahmans, belonging to the Hermitage Saradwava/ of Kanwa Somarata, the Domestic Priest Mitravasu, brother-in-law cf the King, and Superintendent of the City Police Vatayana, the Chamberlain or Attendant on the Women's Apartments Suchaka Januka Two Constables Vetravati, Female Warder or Doorkeeper Latitha Matali, Charioteer of Indra Sarva-Damana, afterwards Bharata, a little boy, son of Dushyanta by Shakuntala Kasyapa, a Divine Sage, Progenitor of Men and Gods, Son of Marichi, and Grandson of Brahma Aditi, Wife of Kasvapa. Grand-daughter of Brahma through her Father, Daksha Fishermen, Officers, and Hermits
BENEDICTION:
Isa preserve you! he who is revealed in these eight forms by man perceptible — Water of all creation's works the first; The Fire that bears on high the sacrifice Presented with solemnity to Heaven; The Priest, the Holy Offerer of gifts; The Sun and Moon, those two majestic orbs, Eternal marshallers of day and night; The subtle Ether vehicle of sound, Diffused throughout the boundless Universe; The Earth, by sages called 'the place of Birth' of all material essences and things; And Air, which giveth life to all that breathe.

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
BBC Home Service Basic

CHILDREN'S HOUR

For Children of Most Ages
' The Singing Forest' by H. Mortimer Batten told by Derek McCulloch
2 — ' The Yellowface Raider'
In this story from the above book, Corrie, the pet red deer calf, tries to escape and join his own kind, but the alarming experience of the yellowface raider makes him think again ...
5.20 'The Atom Chasers'
A serial play in six parts by Angus MacVicar
2 — ' The Anchorite's Cave '
Produced by Kathleen Garscadden
Sandy, Jock, and Willie are convinced that a spy is at work in the West Highland parish of Dunglass. One dark evening they follow two unidentified figures from the Atom Station to the front gate of Major Morrison's house. Willie is left to keep watch on the gate, while Sandy and Jock climb the high wall above the greenhouse. As they crane their necks to see the strangers coming up the drive, they overbalance and fall with a crash ...
5.50 Children's Hour prayers conducted by the Rev. Clifford Smith
4—' Ambush for Ostriches'
BBC Television

Animal Magic

A fortnightly series in which Johnny Morris looks at Creatures Great and Small.

Keeper Morris
Johnny Morris has always wanted to be a keeper. He seizes a chance at Bristol Zoo. Will it be the adventure of his dreams?

Badgers
More about Tony Soper's pet, Qandy, and about a badger watch with Eric Ashby.

In the New Forest
A visit to Sven Berlin's Zoo, an animal farm with a difference.

From the West
BBC One London

For Schools, Colleges

9.35 Mathshow
Cover-up Story
9.58 Maths-in-a-Box
A mathematical story by ALEX GLASGOW 6: A Long Story
With EUGENE GEASLEY
CLARK FLANAGAN , MELISSA WILKS PIPPA SPARKES , ALEX GLASGOW Producer MORTON SURGUY
10.16 Look and Read The Boy from Space by RICHARD CARPENTER 6: Where is Tom?
Presented by PHIL CHENEY and CHARLES COLLINGWOOD Director JILL GLINDON REED
10.38 Resource Units 11-13: History The Country of the Setting Sun
11.0 Watch
Robinson Crusoe : Footprints in the Sand
11.17 Television Club Pet Subject
11.38 Shakespeare in Perspective 'Henry IV (Part 2). FRED EMERY introduces Sir John Falstaff.
12.5 pm General Studies The Silicon Factor
2: Sink or Swim?
BBC One London

For Schools, Colleges

9.5 Realidades de Espana,
5: Soria and Antonio Machado .
9.35 Encounter: Germany Meeting Point
9.53 Treffpnnkt: Deutschland An Ort und Stelle
10.10 Look and Read The Boy from Space:
Where is Tom?
10.35 Resource Units: Religious and Moral Education
You'll Be Sorry
11.0 Watch
Early Life
11.17 Television Club Pet Subject
11.38 Shakespeare in Perspective Twelfth Night
12.5 pm General Studies Have a Drink?
BBC One London

Saturday Superstore

with Mike Read , Keith Chegwin Sarah Greene and David Icke What's in store this morning?
For a start, there's Leo Sayer with a chance to win a Star Bargain. Keith will be taking the plunge when he tries an amazing new high speed water sport. Dancing through the store: Saturday Girl Sarah-watch her fancy footwork as she takes a kick at goal. Talking of football, David Icke will be stocking up the Sports Counter. Show jumping fans will find plenty in store today. There's a great bargain on offer for pop fans. Mike's got details of a Smash Hit competition. Also appearing in the Music Department, George Michael and Andrew Ridgley of WHAM. Vet Mike Findlay will be on hand with some more advice in the Pet Department. Join Mike in the Lift Hall for a new round of the Lift-off Quiz. There's prizes from all departments.
If you want to play, send your name, age, address and phone number to:
The General Manager, Saturday Superstore, BBCtv, London W12 8QT. This is a Hmited offer. First come, first served. Phone your late orders on [number removed]from 8.30
Editor CHRIS BELLINGER
BBC One London

Saturday Superstore

with Mike Read Keith Chegwin Sarah Greene and Paul Young, Davy Jones, Roger Mugford, Spandau Ballet.
Check out the Superstore for a morning full of cartoons, music, competitions and fun. Pop star Paul Young will be here to take your calls and show his new video. Davy Jones, fresh off the hopes to ride in the Grand National. Find out more this morning.
Does your school have an incredible caretaker? If it does then watch out for details of the Caretaker of the Year Competition. It will be launched today.
If you've got a 'problem pet', animal expert Roger Mugford will try to help you sort it out. Phone him on [number removed] (lines are open from 8.30 this morning).
Do you think your mum needs a new look? Is she keeping up with today's fashion? Fashion editor Karen Foster will be here with some brilliant ideas to help you 'renovate your mum'.
Don't forget the address for all your tellygrams, orders and letters:
Saturday SuperStore, BBCtv, [address removed].
BBC One London

Blue Peter

with Simon Groom, Janet Ellis and Michael Sundin
Remember, Remember ... Cats and dogs hate explosions and Jack and Goldie are no exception!
Keep your pet safely indoors tonight and if you're having a Guy Fawkes party, watch out for some culinary tips when Janet and Michael join the Royal Navy - in a rain-sodden field near Exmouth - to compete in the annual Corps Cookery Competition.
Assistant editor LEWIS BRONZE Editor BIDDY BAXTER
*CEEFAX SUBTITLES
BBC Two England

Daytime on Two

9.35 Encounter: Austria
On the Farm; Ski-ing on the Dachstein
Learning to ski in Austria is as common as swimming lessons here, so - what is it like? Producer SUSAN PATON (R) (E)
9.52
Look, Look and Look Again. Living Images
Yorkshire children use a model for a portrait of a character from fiction.
Producer JUDITH MILES (R) (E)
10.15 Look and Read Badger Girl
Stripey the Badger Debbie has befriended Stripey the badger. But can a badger be a pet? And shouldn't the children tell Mrs Rudge about him?
Written by ANDREW DAVIES
Assistant producer ROGER FRY Producer SUSAN PATON (R) (E)
10.38 Science in Action Sporting Chance
Having a go yourself is the theme of this new 'Hands-on-Science' series. This week: explore the physics of pedal power, find out how to make a bike go faster and marvel at human-powered vehicles.
Presented by KJARTAN POSKITT and TERRY MARSH
Assistant producer CLARE ELSTOW
Series producer ROBIN MUDGE (R) (E)
11.0 Watch. Visual Arts: Making and Modelling
(E)
11.17 Near and Far. Concrete The look of many towns and cities owes much to the use of concrete. However, the extraction of its raw materials - limestone, clay, sand and gravel has had an even more dramatic effect on rural areas.
Producer ROBIN GWYN (R) (E)
11.40 Wondermaths Programme 2
The spaceship Investigator strays into a powercloud. To find their way out, Stella and Zak must recognise and model marker-buoys made of cubes. Designer RORY MITCHELL
Series producer DAVID SCOTT COWAN (E)
11.57 MI 10: Mathematical Investigations
3: Arithmetic Progressions How to make a number sequence add up without really trying.
4: Shuffles
From riffling cards to ringing the changes - what patterns emerge?
Presenter HILARY CLOUGH
Animation STEWART HARDY FILMS Film editor JOHN BEJJNGHAM
Producer DAVID ROSEVEARE (R) (E)
12.18 pm Maths Counts by JOHN TULLY 2: Round About
Seven dollars and 99 cents. Call it eight dollars. Steve and Wendy learn how to round numbers up - and down? (R) (E)
12.40 Honourable Members Five programmes examining the role of MPs.
2: The Art of the Possible
Life at Westminster; ancient ritual, legislation, the Whip and the guillotine, Question Time, select committees.
MPs and former MPs taking part include JOHN BIFFEN , EDWARD DU CANN.
JULLAN CRITCHLEY. MICHAEL COCKS and GEORGE CUNNINGHAM.
Consultant MALCOLM DAVIES
Directed by NICHOLAS METCALFE Produced by TONY ROBERTS (R)
1.5 Pages from Ceefax
1.33 English Time: Buddy by NIGEL HINTON
A drama serial in five parts based on the novel by the same author. Featuring ROGER DALTREY as Terry 1: Raining in My Heart
Buddy steals things from shops. He wants to stop - especially as it seems as if his Teddy Boy dad, Terry, might be getting back into his old criminal ways. But Buddy badly needs money for the school trip....
Editor ALASTAIR MACKAY
Producer ROGER TONGE (R) (E)
2.0 You and Me
A series for 4- and 5-year-olds. Cosmo has a violent tantrum,
Dibs and Indira try to calm her. Maths on the farm: 'Matching eggs to the birds that laid them'. Book: Brown Bear , What Do You See? by ERIC CARLE andBILL MARTIN JR
Presenter INDIRA JOSHI Animation ANDY WALKER
Producer RICHARD CALLANAN (R) (E)
BBC One London

Caterpillar Trail

The first of ten programmes with Stuart Bradley and Jessica Holm
Watch the birdies! Spot a popular pet, some garden visitors and a wealth of wildfowl on the trail today. Production SHEILA FRASER
9 BACK PAGES: 102
BBC Radio 2

Anne Robinson

from the 100th Crufts dog show at the NEC, Birmingham.
Anne Robinson takes time out of the studio to absorb the atmosphere, watch some of the judging and chat to dog experts, dog owners and dog lovers about their favourite pet. Producer Ruth Cubbm
BBC Two England

The Likely Lads: Entente Cordiale

The first hit comedy written by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais, starring James Bolam as Terry and Rodney Bewes as Bob, returns for a repeat run this summer with the first ever episode shown tonight. See today's choices. (Rpt)
See This Week: page 8
BBC Two England

Sounds of the Eighties

The highly successful UK pop synthesiser scene is the focus of the fourth in an eight-part series about eighties music.
See today's choices.
Producer Jeannie Clark ; Executive producer
DavidJeffcock Stereo Subtitled ..................43
BBC Two England

Children's BBC Breakfast

7.30 Secret Life of Toys Puppets.
Repeated at lpm Repeat
7.45 The Raccoons Animation.
Repeat...........................................
8.00 The Wacky Races A double bill of cartoon fun.
8.20 Young People's Specials A young boy fights to save his pet duck.
Repeat...........................................
9.05 Activ8 A look at netball, catamaran sailing, Irish dancing, and football injuries. Repeat Stereo
9.35 Sweet Valley High Californian teenage drama. Repeat Stereo ..
10.00 Funnybones More creepy fun with the skeletons. Repeat Stereo ....
10.10 Teletubbies Our Pig Winnie. The
Teletubbies watch a film about a little boy and his special friend- a pig called Winnie. With the voices of Mark Heenahan , Toyah Willcox , Eric Sykes and Tim Whitnall. Teletubbies PUI FAN LEE. JOHN SIMMIT , NIKKY
SMEDLEY, DAVE THOMPSON
Stereo............................................
10.35 Babar Cartoon fun. Repeat.
BBC One London

999 Lifesavers

The series which reconstructs real-life rescues, with Michael Buerk and Donna Bernard.
Tonight an explosion on board a yacht leaves a couple and their dog stranded at sea and fighting for survival, and two pilots watch in horror as the propeller drops off their plane and they plunge to earth. Plus advice on how to stop your pet having an accident.
Series producer Tessa Finch ; Series editor AndreaWills Stereo
WEB SITE: www.bbc.co.uk/education






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

About this project

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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