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2LO London and 5XX Daventry

RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From the Holy Trinity Church,
Brighton
Hymp 292
Lord's Prayer
Versicles and Responses
Psalm XV
Lesson
Collects
Anthem, ' Shepherd of Souls' Jones
Sermon by the Rev. R. J. CAMPBELL
, D.D.
Hymn 477
(For 8.45-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

'SAMSON AND DELILAH'

ACT II
(Relayed from the Royal Opera
House, Covent Garden)
AT night, before her house in the lonely valley of Sorek, Delilah muses on her plot to be avenged on the Israelites. The High Priest comes to beg her to betray Samson, the Hebrew leader. She is only too ready to do so, to avenge her people. She determines to get from him the secret of his power.
Now a storm arises as Samson comes to
Delilah's dwelling. She exercises her arts of fascination upon him, but in the roll of the thunder Samson hoars the warning voice of God. Delilah spurns him and rushes into the house, but her work is done. for Samson cannot resist, and follows her. The Philistine soldiers now creep in, and in a few moments Delilah appears at the window holding Samson's shorn hair, and exclaiming: 'Tis done!' Samson, crying ' Betrayed ! ' is overcome and bound.
5XX Daventry

A Coleridge-Taylor Programme

ONE day, the conductor of a Croydon theatre orchestra, looking out of his window, saw a little curly-haired, black-faced boy holding a small-sized violin in one hand and playing marbles with the other. He called him in, put some music before him, and was delighted to find that he could play it in perfect time and tune.
From that moment the child, whose name was
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor , was ear-marked for music. While he was still at school he led the class-singing with his violin, and began to appear in public.
Some few years later he was enrolled, by a local benefactor, as a student of the Royal College of Music.
While still a student at the College, the youth produced the first part of his now famous Hiawatha—a work which exhibited both racial and individual qualities, and attracted immediate admiration.
It was in the hall of the Royal College of Music that it had its first performance. Stanford eonducted, and Sullivan was present. The evening was a triumph, and heralded his brilliant career. That was in 1898, when Coleridge-Taylor was twenty-three. He lived only fourteen years more, dying, like Purcell, at the age of thirty-seven.
A book about the composer is Sayers's Samuel
Coleridge-Taylor: His Life and Letters.'
CECIL Dixon (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
BAND
Rhapsodic Dance, ' The Bamboula '
THE BAMBOULA is a rhapsody in dance style on matter contained in the composer's
Bamboula, a West Indian air, one of the Twenty-four Negro Melodies which he collected and transcribed for the Pianoforte. This orchestral piece was commissioned by an American patron.
CECIL Dixon
Selected Solos
BAND
Three Dream Dances
TN 1910 Coleridge-Taylor was commissioned by Sir Herbert Tree (for some of whose productions he had already written incidental music) to compose music for Alfred Noyes ' fairy play The Forest of Wild Thyme. The play was not, after all, put on the stage by Tree, and the composer later issued some of his music under various titles-Three Dream Dunces and Christmas Overture, among others.
5XX Daventry

A Religious Service

From St. Martin-in-the-Fields
Address by the Rev. PAT MCCORMICK
The BELLS
Order of Service :
Hymn, ' Immortal, invisible, God only wise ’ (English Hymnal, No. 407)
Confession and Thanksgivings Psalm 146
Nunc Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn, ' God is working His purpose out ' (Ancient and Modern, 735)
Address : The Rev. P. MCCORMICK
Hymn, ' Hail, gladdening Light '
(Ancient and Modem, IS)
Blessing
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Coleridge-Taylor Programme

ONE day, the conductor of a Croydon theatre orchestra, looking out of his window, saw a little curly-haired, black-faced boy holding a small-sized violin in one hand and playing marbles with the other. He called him in, put some music before him, and was delighted to find that he could play it in perfect time and tune.
From that moment the child, whose name was
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor , was ear-marked for music. While he was still at school he led the class-singing with his violin, and began to appear in public.
Some few years later he was enrolled, by a local benefactor, as a student of the Royal College of Music.
While still a student at the College, the youth produced the first part of his now famous Hiawatha—a work which exhibited both racial and individual qualities, and attracted immediate admiration.
It was in the hall of the Royal College of Music that it had its first performance. Stanford eonducted, and Sullivan was present. The evening was a triumph, and heralded his brilliant career. That was in 1898, when Coleridge-Taylor was twenty-three. He lived only fourteen years more, dying, like Purcell, at the age of thirty-seven.
A book about the composer is Sayers's Samuel
Coleridge-Taylor: His Life and Letters.'
CECIL Dixon (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
BAND
Rhapsodic Dance, ' The Bamboula '
THE BAMBOULA is a rhapsody in dance style on matter contained in the composer's
Bamboula, a West Indian air, one of the Twenty-four Negro Melodies which he collected and transcribed for the Pianoforte. This orchestral piece was commissioned by an American patron.
CECIL Dixon
Selected Solos
BAND
Three Dream Dances
TN 1910 Coleridge-Taylor was commissioned by Sir Herbert Tree (for some of whose productions he had already written incidental music) to compose music for Alfred Noyes ' fairy play The Forest of Wild Thyme. The play was not, after all, put on the stage by Tree, and the composer later issued some of his music under various titles-Three Dream Dunces and Christmas Overture, among others.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'SAMSON AND DELILAH'

ACT II
(Relayed from the Royal Opera
House, Covent Garden)
AT night, before her house in the lonely valley of Sorek, Delilah muses on her plot to be avenged on the Israelites. The High Priest comes to beg her to betray Samson, the Hebrew leader. She is only too ready to do so, to avenge her people. She determines to get from him the secret of his power.
Now a storm arises as Samson comes to
Delilah's dwelling. She exercises her arts of fascination upon him, but in the roll of the thunder Samson hoars the warning voice of God. Delilah spurns him and rushes into the house, but her work is done. for Samson cannot resist, and follows her. The Philistine soldiers now creep in, and in a few moments Delilah appears at the window holding Samson's shorn hair, and exclaiming: 'Tis done!' Samson, crying ' Betrayed ! ' is overcome and bound.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Religious Service

From St. Martin-in-the-Fields
Address by the Rev. PAT MCCORMICK
The BELLS
Order of Service :
Hymn, ' Immortal, invisible, God only wise ’ (English Hymnal, No. 407)
Confession and Thanksgivings Psalm 146
Nunc Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn, ' God is working His purpose out ' (Ancient and Modern, 735)
Address : The Rev. P. MCCORMICK
Hymn, ' Hail, gladdening Light '
(Ancient and Modem, IS)
Blessing
5XX Daventry

CHAMBER MUSIC

FLORENCE HOLDING (Soprano), REX PALMER (Baritone), RAYA GARBOUSOVA ('Cello),
RAE ROBERTSON (Pianoforte) Allegro ma non tanto (Not too quick) ; Scherzo :
Allegro molto (Very quick) ; Adagio cantabile (Slow, in a singing style); Allegro vivace (Quick and lively)
QCHUMANN'S song is among that wonderful outpouring; of songs that came in the first few months of his happy marriage. The theme is the beloved one, steadfast of heart and lofty of mind. THE VAIN SERENADE is tliat of a lover who, outside his lady's house, begs her to admit him, but is rebuffed. ' Please go home to bed ! ' is all he gets after standing, nearly frozen, in the icy wind.
IN September, 1827, Schubert was taken by his friend Jenger on a three weeks' visit to Oratz, where he stayed as the guest of Dr. Pachler, a barrister whose wife was an excellent musician, well known to Beethoven. The time was spent in picnics, excursions, and a round of amusements. Schubert's famous setting of Who is Sylvia ? (the mock-serenade from Two Gentlemen of Verona) was composed during this visit and dedicated to the hostess. Allegro con brio (Quick, fiery) ; Introduction leading to Adagio molto (Very slow); Hondo, Allegretto moderato (Moderately quick)
4.30 RAYA GARBOUSOVA
Selected Items
5XX Daventry

Mr. DAVID BOMBERG and Mrs. STEWART ERSKINE : The Ancient City of Petra '

THIS evening's duologue is the result of an adventurous visit paid to Petra, famous as ' the rose-red city half as old as time,' by Mr. Bomberg and his wife in 1924. Mr. Bomberg was the first painter to work in this ancient city of Arabia since the visit of David Roberts in the early part of the last century. They stayed there for six months, living under canvas, and with an armed escort sent for their protection by the Government of Trans-Jordania. They were visited there by Mrs. Stewart Erskine , the well-known authoress and traveller, who will exchange reminiscences this evening with Mr. Bomberg. The letter's exhibition of pictures at the Leicester Galleries on his return from Petra aroused great interest in artistic circles. He is now holding a private exhibition in his studio at [address removed], and any reader who wishes to obtain an invitation should write to him there.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

LESLEY DUDLEY (Soprano)
HEDDLE NASH (Tenor)
THE WlBELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE wicked Duke of Mantua has been making love to Gilda, the daughter of Rigoletto, the Duke's jester. Gilda is entranced with her lover, who has told her he is Gualtier Malde , a poor student, and when he has left her she muses on his ' dear name.'
THE first of the Brahms pieces is a joyous
-1 song, beginning with a glowing comparison of the lover's affection to the blossoming elder tree, whilst the dear oneis described as the sunshine, which falls upon the tree and fills it with fragrance and delight.
In The Message the lover begs the breeze, as it gently fans his beloved, to listen, and, should she be wondering if he still lives in sorrow, to whisper to her that he was indeed in the depths of gloom, until new hope came to him at the moment when he entered into her thoughts.
The Vain Suit is a lover's serenade (the words those of a folk song from the Lower Rhine).
9.15 Dr. L. F. RUSHBROOK WILLIAMS : The
Princes of India-Romance and Reality '
WHEN we think of ' 'India' it is usually of British India, which is directly administered by the Government at Delhi. But outside this India there is another-the India of the States ruled by their own Princes, who maintain their own relations with the Government. Some of these Princes are as impressive as any of the potentates of the East; the Nizam of Hyderabad, for instance, rules more than twelve million people, and his revenues are in the neighbourhood of four million pounds a year, whilst he is one of the five princes who receive a salute of twenty-one guns. Dr. Rushbrook Williams has an extensive and intimate acquaintance with the ' native States,' as, after holding numerous important posts under the Government of India, he became Political Secretary to the Maharaja of Patiala in 1925, and he is now Foreign Minister of the State.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Mr. DAVID BOMBERG and Mrs. STEWART ERSKINE : The Ancient City of Petra '

THIS evening's duologue is the result of an adventurous visit paid to Petra, famous as ' the rose-red city half as old as time,' by Mr. Bomberg and his wife in 1924. Mr. Bomberg was the first painter to work in this ancient city of Arabia since the visit of David Roberts in the early part of the last century. They stayed there for six months, living under canvas, and with an armed escort sent for their protection by the Government of Trans-Jordania. They were visited there by Mrs. Stewart Erskine , the well-known authoress and traveller, who will exchange reminiscences this evening with Mr. Bomberg. The letter's exhibition of pictures at the Leicester Galleries on his return from Petra aroused great interest in artistic circles. He is now holding a private exhibition in his studio at [address removed], and any reader who wishes to obtain an invitation should write to him there.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

LESLEY DUDLEY (Soprano)
HEDDLE NASH (Tenor)
THE WlBELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE wicked Duke of Mantua has been making love to Gilda, the daughter of Rigoletto, the Duke's jester. Gilda is entranced with her lover, who has told her he is Gualtier Malde , a poor student, and when he has left her she muses on his ' dear name.'
THE first of the Brahms pieces is a joyous
-1 song, beginning with a glowing comparison of the lover's affection to the blossoming elder tree, whilst the dear oneis described as the sunshine, which falls upon the tree and fills it with fragrance and delight.
In The Message the lover begs the breeze, as it gently fans his beloved, to listen, and, should she be wondering if he still lives in sorrow, to whisper to her that he was indeed in the depths of gloom, until new hope came to him at the moment when he entered into her thoughts.
The Vain Suit is a lover's serenade (the words those of a folk song from the Lower Rhine).
9.15 Dr. L. F. RUSHBROOK WILLIAMS : The
Princes of India-Romance and Reality '
WHEN we think of ' 'India' it is usually of British India, which is directly administered by the Government at Delhi. But outside this India there is another-the India of the States ruled by their own Princes, who maintain their own relations with the Government. Some of these Princes are as impressive as any of the potentates of the East; the Nizam of Hyderabad, for instance, rules more than twelve million people, and his revenues are in the neighbourhood of four million pounds a year, whilst he is one of the five princes who receive a salute of twenty-one guns. Dr. Rushbrook Williams has an extensive and intimate acquaintance with the ' native States,' as, after holding numerous important posts under the Government of India, he became Political Secretary to the Maharaja of Patiala in 1925, and he is now Foreign Minister of the State.
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 61) Bach

'NUN KOMM DER HEIDEN HEILAND'
(Come, Redeemer of our Race)
Relayed from Birmingham
KATE WINTER (Soprano)
JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
ROBERT MAITLAND (Baritone)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
THIS Is an early work, presumal composed at Weimar in 3714, for the first Sunday in Advent. Its design is in many ways unusual. and the tiput chorus takes the old Advent hymn and makes it. with choir and orchestra, into a - form of French Overture. There is a solemn introduction, muestoso, and then while the soprano voice begins the hymn, followed by the bass, and afterwards by the full choir, the orchestra accompanies with the figure. heard at the outset. At the words Hailed by all the wondering earth,' the time changes to allegro, and Bach has marked this passage ' Gai.' The slow tempo returns at the end to make a solemn finish...
The Tenor next has a recitative finishing with an arioso, followed by a simple and melodious aria with a long orchestral prelude, and then, with a figure which clearly represents the Lord knocking at the door-stern pizzicato chords from the strings-the bass sings, ' Behold I stand at the do and knock.' The aria which follows is effectively built up from the very simple motive which appears at the outset.
The final Chorale is also In unusual form, n fantasia on the old hymn, ' How brightly shines the morning star,' which the soprano voices sing, while the others and the orchestra make it into a fantasia on the melody.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs. Novello and Co., Ltd. 1.-Chorus.
Come, Redeemer of our race, Virgin-born by holy grace,
Hail'd by all the wond'ring earth; God of old ordained His birth.
II-Recitatire (Tenor).
The Saviour now appeareth, and our poor human form of flesh and blood He weareth, that we may all be one with Him indeed. Oh ! Thou most perfect joy, what wondrous things hast Thou not done, what dost Thou not each day Thy love expressing ? Thou comest down in light, to crown Thiue own with blessing.
III.-Aria (Tenor).
Come, Jesu, come, Thy church awaits
Thee, and deign to bless the new-born year. Help us in all to seek Thy glory, to hold in Truth the sacred story, and grow in love and holy iear.
IV.-Recitatire (Bass). Behold, I stand at the door and knock.
If any man hear My voice and open the door, I will come in to him and will sup with him and he with Me.
V.-Aria (Soprano).
Open wide, my heart, thy portals, Jesus enters into thee. Though my heart to dust returneth. He a home In me hath sought. Who the soul that He hath bought never from His presence spurneth. Oh, how blessed shall I be :
VI.-Morale.
Amen! Come Thou crown of all re-rejoicing. no more linger.
All my soul for Thee is longing.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 61) Bach

'NUN KOMM DER HEIDEN HEILAND'
(Come, Redeemer of our Race)
Relayed from Birmingham
KATE WINTER (Soprano)
JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
ROBERT MAITLAND (Baritone)
THE BIRMINGHAM STUDIO ORCHESTRA
THIS Is an early work, presumal composed at Weimar in 3714, for the first Sunday in Advent. Its design is in many ways unusual. and the tiput chorus takes the old Advent hymn and makes it. with choir and orchestra, into a - form of French Overture. There is a solemn introduction, muestoso, and then while the soprano voice begins the hymn, followed by the bass, and afterwards hy the full choir, the orchestra accompanies with the figure. heard at the outset. At the words Hailed by all the wondering earth,' the time changes to allegro, and Bach has marked this passage ' Gai.' The slow tempo returns at the end to make a solemn finish...
The Tenor next has a recitative finishing with an arioso, followed by a simple and melodious aria with a long orchestral prelude, and then, with a figure which clearly represents the Lord knocking at the door-stern pizzicalo chords from the strings-the bass sings, ' Behold I stand at the do and knock.' The aria which follows is effectively built up from the very simple motive which appears at the outset.
The final Chorale is also In unusual form, a fantasia on the old hymn, 'How brightly shines the morning star,' which the soprano voices sing, while the others and the orchestra make it into a fantasia on the melody.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs. Novello and Co., Ltd. 1.-Chorus.
Come, Redeemer of our race, Virgin-born by holy grace,
Hail'd by all the wond'ring earth; (iod of old ordained His birth.
II-Recitatire (Tenor).
The Saviour now appeareth, and our poor human form of flesh and blood He weareth, that we may all be one with Him indeed. Oh ! Thou most perfect joy, what wondrous things hast Thou not done, what dost Thou not each day Thy love expressing ? Thou comest down in light, to crown Thiue own with blessing.
III.-Aria (Tenor).
Come, Jcsu, come, Thy church awaits
Thee, and deign to bless the new-bom year. Help us in all to seek Thy glory, to hold in Truth the sacred story, and grow in love and holy iear.
IV.-Recitatire (Bass). llehold, I stand at the door and knock.
If any man hear My voice and open the door, I will come in to him and will sup with him and ho with Me.
V.-Aria (Soprano).
Open wide, my heart, thy portals, Jesus enters into thee. Though my heart to dust returneth. He a home In me hath sought. Who the soul that He hath bought never from His presence spurneth. Oh, how blessed shall 1 be :
VI.-Morale.
Amen! Come Thou crown of all re-rejoicing. no more linger.
AH my soul for Thee is longing.
5XX Daventry

An Orchestral Concert

HERBERT THORPE (Tenor)
HARRY BRINDLE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
ALTHOUGH the composer of this spirited March is best known as a theatrical conductor, particularly for his long association with His Majesty's Theatre, and for his incidental music to plays, he has given us an imposing volume of music for orchestra, as well as some for voices, and pianoforte and chamber music. He is one of the very few, moreover, who regards the brass band as a sufficiently important medium to compose serious music for it. His Epic Symphony was specially written as the test piece in the chief competition at the Annual Festival and Contest for Brass Bands at the Crystal Palace in the autumn of 1926. FEw musicians ever had so adventurous a career as William Wallace , composer of Maritana. His father was a Military Bandmaster, and the young Wallace was born in Water-ford, Ireland, in 1812. He very quickly became a good player not only of violin and pianoforte, but of the clarinet, and was only seventeen when lie was given a church organist's post. He gave it up within a year, however, the violin attracting him more. In 1834 he played a violin Concerto of his own in Dublin, with such success that he might have looked forward to a prosperous career in that line. But his health gave way and he went to Australia in the hope of warding off a threatening lung trouble. Sheep farming was nominally his job there, but he continued to play his violin, not only as a recreation, but in concerts. Australia, however, failed to hold him either to his farming or his fiddle, and for some years he wandered over many parts of the world, experiencing such vicissitudes as earthquakes, battles between rival South American States, and even a narrow escape from the clutches of a tiger. But everywhere ho went his reputation as a violinist was enhanced.
By 1845 he was in London, and someone seems to have suggested to him that he should compose an opera. Maritana was the result; it appeared near the end of 1845, and was an immediate and assured success. It has ever since maintained its hold on the popular affections, although Wallace himself wrote other and better works afterwards.
IN the first half of last century Sir Henry Bishop held a loading place in the music of this country, as composer for the stage, particularly Covent Garden Opera and Drury Lane ; he was, too, one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society. His stage works are all practically forgotten, largely because their libretti had no enduring qualities, and he is best remembered today by one or two isolated songs. Some of these have all the spontaneous charm and simplicity of folk-songs, and My Pretty Jane might well be called a classic of its own naive and innocent order.
HARRY BRINDLE
PINSUTI spent a large ipart of his life in this country, though it was in his native Italy that his biggest works were produced. He came here as a youngster, to study music in London, returning to Italy at the age of sixteen to become a private pupil of Rossini's. Before he was twenty he came back to London and soon established himself as one of the foremost singing masters of the day, teaching both in London and in Newcastle. For many years he was Professor of Singing at the Royal Academy of Music, and had a share in training such distinguished artists as Grisi, Patti, Mario, and many others. He was a prolific composer and published close on 250 songs, many part songs and choruses, as well as some pianoforte music. Many of these enjoyed a tremendous vogue in the latter part of last century, and one or two are still popular. But in Italy he won more important successes with three Operas and special festival music for national occasions. He was created a Knight of the Italian Kingdom in 1878. ORCHESTRA
Selection, ' Show Boat' ................. Kern Waltz , ' La Source ' (The Fountain) ..
Waldteufel HERBERT THORPE and HARRY BRINDLE
The Battle Eve .................... Bonheur The Two Gendarmes ................ Offenbach
ORCHESTRA'
Phantasy, ' The Three Bears' ......Eric Coatee Tarantella, ' A. Day in Naples ' .......... Byng
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

An Orchestral Concert

HERBERT THORPE (Tenor)
HARRY BRINDLE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
ALTHOUGH the composer of this spirited March is best known as a theatrical conductor, particularly for his long association with His Majesty's Theatre, and for his incidental music to plays, he has given us an imposing volume of music for orchestra, as well as some for voices, and pianoforte and chamber music. He is one of the very few, moreover, who regards the brass band as a sufficiently important medium to compose serious music for it. His Epic Symphony was specially written as the test piece in the chief competition at the Annual Festival and Contest for Brass Bands at the Crystal Palace in the autumn of 1926. FEw musicians ever had so adventurous a career as William Wallace , composer of Maritana. His father was a Military Bandmaster, and the young Wallace was born in Water-ford, Ireland, in 1812. He very quickly became a good player not only of violin and pianoforte, but of the clarinet, and was only seventeen when lie was given a church organist's post. He gave it up within a year, however, the violin attracting him more. In 1834 he played a violin Concerto of his own in Dublin, with such success that he might have looked forward to a prosperous career in that line. But his health gave way and he went to Australia in the hope of warding off a threatening lung trouble. Sheep farming was nominally his job there, but he continued to play his violin, not only as a recreation, but in concerts. Australia, however, failed to hold him either to his farming or his fiddle, and for some years he wandered over many parts of the world, experiencing such vicissitudes as earthquakes, battles between rival South American States, and even a narrow escape from the clutches of a tiger. But everywhere ho went his reputation as a violinist was enhanced.
By 1845 he was in London, and someone seems to have suggested to him that he should compose an opera. Maritana was the result; it appeared near the end of 1845, and was an immediate and assured success. It has ever since maintained its hold on the popular affections, although Wallace himself wrote other and better works afterwards.
IN the first half of last century Sir Henry Bishop held a loading place in the music of this country, as composer for the stage, particularly Covent Garden Opera and Drury Lane ; he was, too, one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society. His stage works are all practically forgotten, largely because their libretti had no enduring qualities, and he is best remembered today by one or two isolated songs. Some of these have all the spontaneous charm and simplicity of folk-songs, and My Pretty Jane might well be called a classic of its own naive and innocent order.
HARRY BRINDLE
PINSUTI spent a large ipart of his life in this country, though it was in his native Italy that his biggest works were produced. He came here as a youngster, to study music in London, returning to Italy at the age of sixteen to become a private pupil of Rossini's. Before he was twenty he came back to London and soon established himself as one of the foremost singing masters of the day, teaching both in London and in Newcastle. For many years he was Professor of Singing at the Royal Academy of Music, and had a share in training such distinguished artists as Grisi, Patti, Mario, and many others. He was a prolific composer and published close on 250 songs, many part songs and choruses, as well as some pianoforte music. Many of these enjoyed a tremendous vogue in the latter part of last century, and one or two are still popular. But in Italy he won more important successes with three Operas and special festival music for national occasions. He was created a Knight of the Italian Kingdom in 1878. ORCHESTRA
Selection, ' Show Boat' ................. Kern Waltz , ' La Source ' (The Fountain) ..
Waldteufel HERBERT THORPE and HARRY BRINDLE
The Battle Eve .................... Bonheur The Two Gendarmes ................ Offenbach
ORCHESTRA'
Phantasy, ' The Three Bears' ......Eric Coatee Tarantella, ' A. Day in Naples ' .......... Byng
5XX Daventry

B.B.C. SYMPHONY CONCERT

Conducted by ALBERT COATES
Relayed from the Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal Violins: WYNN REEVES and S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Part I
JUVENTUS is a full-sized Symphonic Poem in one movement, although tho mood changes several times. It begins with an impetuous Allegro section in which the first soaring theme makes its decisive appearance almost at the outset. In this form and in various transformations it has a large say in the work. Very soon afterwards another exuberant theme is heard on first violins; it, too, is freely used, and before the end of the opening section there is still a third vivacious melody, which appears in fuller form a little later. On these the long first section is built up with real exuberance and vigour; there are subsidiary themes, but all are closely akin to one or other of those heard first. The first part of the piece sinks eventually to soft tone, and very quietly a calm, languorous section succeeds; tor a little it and the vivacity of the opening interchange, to lead anon to a longer sustained movement. Here flutes, clarinets, trumpets, and violas, announce the theme, but it is interrupted ever and anon by hurrying figures on the strings. This calm section comes to an end very quietly with long-held chords and a tremulous bass, and then, gradually at first, the vivacity of the opening returns, with the same themes as in the first part of the piece. It is interrupted once more by a broader section, but it is the exultant spirits of the opening which bring the work to its joyous close.
THE third has always been the most popular of Tchaikovsky's five orchestral Suites ; the last movement-the longest and most important in the Suite-has a specially strong hold on tho music-lover's affections. It is an Air with variations. The theme, as simple melody, is played by the strings alone, In the first variation flutes and clarinets join forces with the strings, pizzicato. Variation two employs a fuller orchestra, and the third the woodwinds have to themselves, the flute beginning the theme and handing it to the clarinet. The fourth variation is in minor for the whole orchestra, and five has a fugal treatment. Number six is a Tarantelle, seven, like a solemn Chorale, is again for the woodwinds alone. The ninth is a jolly rustic dance, and a violin solo is the feature of number ten. Variation eleven is a quiet, serene movement, and the twelfth is a brilliant Polacca, the longest and most important of the series.

Overture, ' Leonora,' No. 3 - Beethoven
8.17 Tone Poem, 'Juventus' - De Sabato
8.37 Variations from the Third Suite in G - Tchaikovsky
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

B.B.C. SYMPHONY CONCERT

Conducted by ALBERT COATES
Relayed from the Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal Violins: WYNN REEVES and S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Part I
JUVENTUS is a full-sized Symphonic Poem in one movement, although tho mood changes several times. It begins with an impetuous Allegro section in which the first soaring theme makes its decisive appearance almost at the outset. In this form and in various transformations it has a large say in the work. Very soon afterwards another exuberant theme is heard on first violins; it, too, is freely used, and before the end of the opening section there is still a third vivacious melody, which appears in fuller form a little later. On these the long first section is built up with real exuberance and vigour; there are subsidiary themes, but all are closely akin to one or other of those heard first. The first part of the piece sinks eventually to soft tone, and very quietly a calm, languorous section succeeds; tor a little it and the vivacity of the opening interchange, to lead anon to a longer sustained movement. Here flutes, clarinets, trumpets, and violas, announce the theme, but it is interrupted ever and anon by hurrying figures on the strings. This calm section comes to an end very quietly with long-held chords and a tremulous bass, and then, gradually at first, the vivacity of the opening returns, with the same themes as in the first part of the piece. It is interrupted once more by a broader section, but it is the exultant spirits of the opening which bring the work to its joyous close.
THE third has always been the most popular of Tchaikovsky's five orchestral Suites ; the last movement-the longest and most important in the Suite-has a specially strong hold on tho music-lover's affections. It is an Air with variations. The theme, as simple melody, is played by the strings alone, In the first variation flutes and clarinets join forces with the strings, pizzicato. Variation two employs a fuller orchestra, and the third the woodwinds have to themselves, the flute beginning the theme and handing it to the clarinet. The fourth variation is in minor for the whole orchestra, and five has a fugal treatment. Number six is a Tarantelle, seven, like a solemn Chorale, is again for the woodwinds alone. The ninth is a jolly rustic dance, and a violin solo is the feature of number ten. Variation eleven is a quiet, serene movement, and the twelfth is a brilliant Polacca, the longest and most important of the series.
5XX Daventry

A Concert

SUZANNE BERTIN (Soprano)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, ' Tales of Hoffmann ' ...... Offenbach
OFFENBACH'S success as a composer of comic operas of that slight order for which we have no exact equivalent in this country was almost unique. His industry was also astonish. ing, and the number of successful works which he produced in his busy life is well nigh incredible. It was his ambition, however, to write at least one work of a rather more serious order,. and,he was at work on this Tales of Hoffmann when he died. It was completed by Guiraud, and produced in Paris in 1881, the year after its composer's death, and was given over a hundred times in that same year. It has over since been in the repertory in Paris, and is regularly played in most countries of Europe, even in our own.
Offenbach's music enjoyed an extraordinary vogue in this country in the latter part of last century, although, to any who know it at the fountain head, it inevitably loses something of its delicate flavour in crossing the Channel. None the less, Tales of Hoffmann bids fair to keep its hold on our affections, and, either as a whole opera or in part, is well known to the ordinary listener.
There is a Prologue in a wine cellar in which his friends twit Hoffmann, the poet, about his many love affairs, and each of the three acts is his recounting of one of them, always with an evil spirit at his elbow, somewhat after the manner of Mephistopheles in Faust.
5XX Daventry

Love in a Village

An Eighteenth Century Comic Opera in Three Acts
The Words by BICKERSTAFF
The Music by Arne, Handel, Geminiani, Carey Abel, etc
The whole adapted and arranged for broadcasting by JULIAN HERBAGE
Characters in the order you will hear them:
Country people, servants, etc.
THE WIRELESS CHORUS (Chorus Master, Stanford Robinson)
Produced by HOWARD ROSE The Music under the Direction of JULIAN HERBAGE
LOVE IN A VILLAGE originally appeared as a Comic Opera in three Acts, at Covent Garden Theatre in 1762. The music was partly composed by the great Dr. Arne and partly compiled by him from music which was then in vogue, and the piece enjoyed a real success.
At that time rivalry between Covent Garden and Drury Lane was very keen; contemporary records show that Arne's Opera was so popular that only on the nights when Garrick himself appeared at Drury Lane, was there any audience there. No other attraction could prevail against the charm and humour of this light-hearted work.
When Sir Nigel Playfair revived the Opera and produced it at the Lyric, Hammersmith, in 1928, the munie was recast, and additional numbers composed, by Mr. Alfred Reynolds, the Musical Director there, a musician to whom many of the Lyric's productions owed a good deal of their popularity. To a thorough knowledge of the theatre and stage-craft, Mr. Reynolds unites a happy knack of genuine, natural, melody and a thorough craftsmanship in music. A good deal of his work is already familiar to listeners, and he has an assured place of his own among composers of the present day, as well as a strong hold on the affections of all who appreciate fresh and wholesome art with nothing sombre nor troublesome in its make-up.






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