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2LO London and 5XX Daventry

AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THE WIRELESS Orchestra
(Leader, S. KNEALE-KELLEY)
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
RACHEL MORTON (Soprano) ROBERT BURNETT (Baritone)
WHEN the University of Breslau made
Brahms a Doctor of Philosophy he composed, as a graceful recognition of the honour, this Overture, building it out of the tunes of several popular students' songs. First we hear two tunes of Brahms' own composition and then appears the hymn-liko melody of The Stately Houne ; next, the air of the song called The Father of his country ; then the Freshman's. Song, blurted out on Bassoons, and, lastly, Gaudeamus igitur.
3.42 RACHEL MORTON and Orchestra
Selected Items
IN 1898, Elgar was asked to write a work for an important Festival. He was too busy to do so, and suggested that Coleridge-Taylor should be asked. The result was this Ballad, which helped to make the name of the young Composer, then only twenty-three.
The work begins with a roughly energetic introductory Theme on the Strings. Woodwind has the First Main Tune, Strings accompanying.
The opening matter having been repeated, an episode (starting with a lengthened form of the First Main Tune, on the Trumpet), leads to tho Second Main Theme (Muted Violins and Violas).
On this material the Ballad is built up. Though it has no actual story behind it, one can easily imagine it as a musical commentary on some old chivalric tale of love and warfare.
THIS scena comes from the last part of Coleridge-Taylor's setting of Longfellow's
Song of Hiawatha. lagoo, the wandering boaster, tells the Indians what ho has seen-the coming of a great canoe holding a hundred warriors, with white faces. Most people laugh at lagoo's story, but Hiawatha knows better. True is all lagoo tells us,' he declares, ' I have seen it in a vision.'
4.30 RACHEL MORTON
Selected Items
THE hero, Hercules, as a penance for a crime, had to hire himself out for three years. He took service with Omphale, Queen of Lydia, and worked at her side amongst the women-in so uncouth a manner as to win him many a blow. In this ' Symphonic Poem ' you may bear the whirl of the wheels, the derision of the Queen and the sorrow of the enslaved hero.
THE Scherzo reminds us that Dvorak, the son of a butcher-innkeeper, never lost his love of peasant ways. There is something here of the countryman's boisterous good humour, we might say almost of the horse-play variety.
The Last Movement is forceful and dramatic. It opens with a few bars' Introduction, and then the Brass boldly gives out the First Main Tune; this is dealt with for a few moments before the Clarinets have the Second Main Tune. As the Movement goes on wo hear tunes from each of the three previous Movements.
5XX Daventry

NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HENRY J. WOOD
THIS fourth Concerto has three Movements— a quick one, a graceful slow one, in which the Flutes hold the melodic line, and a magnificent fugal Finale.
OTTORINI RESPIGHI'S new 'Preludes,' written in 1926, were suggested by the pictures in the stained-glass windows of Italian churches; in the music the ancient church modes arc suggestively used.
1. The. Flight into Egypt. The composer describes this as 'a tonal representation of the little caravan on a starry night carrying the Treasure of the World.'
II. The Archangel Michael, driving the rebellious angels from Heaven.
III. The Matins of Santa Chiara (St. Clare).
Legend has it that once. when St. Clare was ill, and grieved at not being able to attend matins, she was miraculously transported to the church.
IV. St. Gregory the Great, in all the pomp of hie office, blessing the people.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HENRY J. WOOD
THIS fourth Concerto has three Movements— a quick one, a graceful slow one, in which the Flutes hold the melodic line, and a magnificent fugal Finale.
OTTORINI RESPIGHI'S new 'Preludes,' written in 1926, were suggested by the pictures in the stained-glass windows of Italian churches; in the music the ancient church modes arc suggestively used.
1. The. Flight into Egypt. The composer describes this as 'a tonal representation of the little caravan on a starry night carrying the Treasure of the World.'
II. The Archangel Michael, driving the rebellious angels from Heaven.
III. The Matins of Santa Chiara (St. Clare).
Legend has it that once. when St. Clare was ill, and grieved at not being able to attend matins, she was miraculously transported to the church.
IV. St. Gregory the Great, in all the pomp of hie office, blessing the people.
5XX Daventry

A MISSIONARY TALK

Dr. DUGALD CHRISTIE : ' Medical Work in Mukden'
S.B. from Edinburgh
T0 hold the Imperial Order of the Double
Dragon and the Order of the Precious Star is in itself an indication that the foreigner so honoured has done great service to the Chinese; but when one hears that Dr. Dugald Christie is the only British subject to whom, during his lifetime, a public memorial has ever been erected by the Chinese, one realizes that his work must have been of a truly exceptional character. In this afternoon's talk Dr. Christie, who was formerly Superintendent of the Mukden Medical Mission and Principal of Mukden Medical College, will recount some of the achievements of modern medical science in tho historic land of Manchuria.
(Picture on pag2 649.)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MISSIONARY TALK

Dr. DUGALD CHRISTIE : ' Medical Work in Mukden'
S.B. from Edinburgh
T0 hold the Imperial Order of the Double
Dragon and the Order of the Precious Star is in itself an indication that the foreigner so honoured has done great service to the Chinese; but when one hears that Dr. Dugald Christie is the only British subject to whom, during his lifetime, a public memorial has ever been erected by the Chinese, one realizes that his work must have been of a truly exceptional character. In this afternoon's talk Dr. Christie, who was formerly Superintendent of the Mukden Medical Mission and Principal of Mukden Medical College, will recount some of the achievements of modern medical science in tho historic land of Manchuria.
(Picture on pag2 649.)
5XX Daventry

' LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN'

A Play about a Good Woman by OSCAR WILDE
Produced by HOWARD RosE
SOME of the younger generation, who had heard much of the brilliant wit and decadent elegance of Oscar Wilde , may have been a shade disappointed if they attempted to read his novels and his verse. But as a play-wright Wilde still holds the rage, and it is impossible to deny his claim to be the finest writer of the comedy of manners that the British theatre had produced since Sheridan's timo.
Even now, in the very different intellectual atmosphere of ' after-the war,' there is a fin-desiicle sparkle about, for instance, Lady Windermere's Fan that makes one sympathize with the excitement that pervaded the London of the Yellow Book cult when it was first produced at the St. James's Theatre in February, 1892, and founded the fame that Wilde was to enhance with his later plays.
Lady Windermere's Fan has been broadcast
. before, just about two years ago. On that occasion Miss Edith Hunter , Miss Irene Rooke and Miss Marjorie Clark-Jervoise took the same parts that they will play tonight.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

' LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN'

A Play about a Good Woman by OSCAR WILDE
Produced by HOWARD RosE
SOME of the younger generation, who had heard much of the brilliant wit and decadent elegance of Oscar Wilde , may have been a shade disappointed if they attempted to read his novels and his verse. But as a play-wright Wilde still holds the rage, and it is impossible to deny his claim to be the finest writer of the comedy of manners that the British theatre had produced since Sheridan's timo.
Even now, in the very different intellectual atmosphere of ' after-the war,' there is a fin-desiicle sparkle about, for instance, Lady Windermere's Fan that makes one sympathize with the excitement that pervaded the London of the Yellow Book cult when it was first produced at the St. James's Theatre in February, 1892, and founded the fame that Wilde was to enhance with his later plays.
Lady Windermere's Fan has been broadcast
. before, just about two years ago. On that occasion Miss Edith Hunter , Miss Irene Rooke and Miss Marjorie Clark-Jervoise took the same parts that they will play tonight.
5XX Daventry

A NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

PAUL HERMANN (Violoncello)
THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
Relayed from the Queen's Hall (First Performance in England)
MARCEL LABEY is a French composer, born in 1875, who after being one of d'Indy’s pupils at the Sehola Cantorum, became a Professor of Pianoforte there. He is a member of the Société Nationale de Musique, which since 1871 has given many concerts every year, to introduce the works of living French composers.
Labey's compositions include a three-act
Opera, Birengere, which won a prize in 1927, two Symphonies, an orchestral Fantasia, and this Overture for a Drama, besides sonatas and other chamber music, and songs.
ERNEST BLOCH , born in Switzerland of Jewish parents, forty-eight years ago, is notable as a composer who in several of his works set out to write music embodying the spirit of ancient Jewry, with its sombre dignity, its barbaric element, and its sense of remoteness and mystery.
He himself has said of his work :—
' It is not ray purpose, not my desire, to attempt a " reconstitution ” of Jewish music, or to base my work on melodies more or less authentic. I am not an archaeologist. I hold it of first importance to write good, genuine music, my music. It is the Jewish soul that interests me, the complex, glowing, agitated soul, that I feel vibrating throughout the Bible: the freshness and naivete of the Patriarchs ; the violence that is evident in the prophetic books ; the Jew's savage love of justice ; the despair of the Preacher in Jerusalem; the sorrow and the immensity of the Book of Job ; the sensuality of the Song of Songs.'
The Symphony ' Israel* is in two main Movements, the first having an Introduction, which leads to the quick, agitated Movement proper. This contains music both wild and calm, but the storms of life do not subside in it for long.
The other Movement, which succeeds without break, is in gentler mood, and in this Bloch employed the voices of two Sopranos, two Altos and a Bass.

Spanish Caprice - Rimsky-Korsakov
Overture for a Drama - Labey
Symphony, ' Israel' - Block
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT

PAUL HERMANN (Violoncello)
THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
Relayed from the Queen's Hall (First Performance in England)
MARCEL LABEY is a French composer, born in 1875, who after being one of d'Indy’s pupils at the Sehola Cantorum, became a Professor of Pianoforte there. He is a member of the Société Nationale de Musique, which since 1871 has given many concerts every year, to introduce the works of living French composers.
Labey's compositions include a three-act
Opera, Birengere, which won a prize in 1927, two Symphonies, an orchestral Fantasia, and this Overture for a Drama, besides sonatas and other chamber music, and songs.
ERNEST BLOCH , born in Switzerland of Jewish parents, forty-eight years ago, is notable as a composer who in several of his works set out to write music embodying the spirit of ancient Jewry, with its sombre dignity, its barbaric element, and its sense of remoteness and mystery.
He himself has said of his work :—
' It is not ray purpose, not my desire, to attempt a " reconstitution ” of Jewish music, or to base my work on melodies more or less authentic. I am not an archaeologist. I hold it of first importance to write good, genuine music, my music. It is the Jewish soul that interests me, the complex, glowing, agitated soul, that I feel vibrating throughout the Bible: the freshness and naivete of the Patriarchs ; the violence that is evident in the prophetic books ; the Jew's savage love of justice ; the despair of the Preacher in Jerusalem; the sorrow and the immensity of the Book of Job ; the sensuality of the Song of Songs.'
The Symphony ' Israel* is in two main Movements, the first having an Introduction, which leads to the quick, agitated Movement proper. This contains music both wild and calm, but the storms of life do not subside in it for long.
The other Movement, which succeeds without break, is in gentler mood, and in this Bloch employed the voices of two Sopranos, two Altos and a Bass.
5XX Daventry

The British Legion Memorial Service

Conducted by the DEAN OF WESTMINSTER, The Very Rev.
W. FOXLEY NORRIS, D.D.
Relayed from
Cbe Cenotapb, Whitehall
Order of Service :
Hymn, ' O God, our Help in ages past' Prayers
Anthem, Wisdom iii, 1, 2 Collects
Hymn, ' All people that on earth do dwell ' The Benediction
The Placing of the Legion's Wreath
THE LAST POST
THE REVEILLÉ
THE NATIONAL ANTHEM
THE Annual Service that the British Legion holds at the Cenotaph is, next to the Armistice Day commemoration, the most impressive event that takes place at the National War Memorial during the year. Last year this service was relayed, and many listeners will remember tho solemn beauty of it-the prayers, the Benediction, the Last Post and the Reveillé, and the lovely singing of the Westminster Abbey Choir. This year's service will follow the same lines ; it will again be conducted by the Dean of Westminster, and the Abbey choir will again take part. In addition, the broadcast transmission should reach an even higher standard, as permanent arrangements can now be made at the Cenotaph (this year the Armistice Day ceremony will be relayed for the first time), and there will be no need to employ overhead cables or wires.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

The British Legion Memorial Service

Conducted by the DEAN OF WESTMINSTER, The Very Rev.
W. FOXLEY NORRIS, D.D.
Relayed from
Cbe Cenotapb, Whitehall
Order of Service :
Hymn, ' O God, our Help in ages past' Prayers
Anthem, Wisdom iii, 1, 2 Collects
Hymn, ' All people that on earth do dwell ' The Benediction
The Placing of the Legion's Wreath
THE LAST POST
THE REVEILLÉ
THE NATIONAL ANTHEM
THE Annual Service that the British Legion holds at the Cenotaph is, next to the Armistice Day commemoration, the most impressive event that takes place at the National War Memorial during the year. Last year this service was relayed, and many listeners will remember tho solemn beauty of it-the prayers, the Benediction, the Last Post and the Reveillé, and the lovely singing of the Westminster Abbey Choir. This year's service will follow the same lines ; it will again be conducted by the Dean of Westminster, and the Abbey choir will again take part. In addition, the broadcast transmission should reach an even higher standard, as permanent arrangements can now be made at the Cenotaph (this year the Armistice Day ceremony will be relayed for the first time), and there will be no need to employ overhead cables or wires.
5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Little Wortleberry holds its ' Feast' -as it always does on Whit
Monday
On this occasion we shall be there. So will the WIRELESS SINGERS
(Directed by STANFORD ROBINSON ) and tho OLOF SEXTET
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Little Wortleberry holds its ' Feast' -as it always does on Whit
Monday
On this occasion we shall be there. So will the WIRELESS SINGERS
(Directed by STANFORD ROBINSON ) and tho OLOF SEXTET
5XX Daventry

CONCERT VERSION of 'THE REBEL MAID'

The Musical Numbers are as follows :
ACT I.
Introduction and Opening Chorus,
' This English Land '
Duet (Dorothy and Percy) and Chorus, ' In 1688'
Song (Derek), ' Home Again ' '
Song (Mary) and Chorus,' Sunshine and Laughter '
Quartet and Gavotte (Mary.
Dorothy, Percy and Derek). ' Shepherdess and Beau Brocade
Duet (Abigail and Solomon), ' When we get back to Dorset '
Song (Derek and Chorus), 'Unavailing little lady '
Song (Mary). ' When a dream of love you cherish'
Finale (Principals and Chorus), But stay, confession I should make
ACT II.
Song (Bunkle) and Male Chorus.
' We've searched the countryside '
Song (Abigail), ' I want my man to be a landlord '
Madrigal (Chorus), How strange this tumult '
Trio (Abigail. Solomon and Bunkle).
, Cautious'
Song (Mary), ' The old-fashioned cloak'
Chorus of Serving Maids, 'Serving maidens merry '
Duet (Solomon and Bunkle) and Male Chorus,
' Ho, ho, diddle dum'
Song (Mary and Chorus), ' Are my lanterns shining ? '
Finale (Principals and Chorus), ' Now, hold, can we not save ? "
ACT III.
Jig (Orchestra)
Opening Chorus, ' When the heart is blithe and jolly
Song (Derek) and Chorus, 'The Fishermen of England'
Song (Mary), ' Sail my Ships '
Madrigal (Chorus), ' Wisdom and Folly"
Duet (Mary and Derek), ' Now stand we on the summit of the hill'
Finale, ' They have come from over the Seas '
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CONCERT VERSION of 'THE REBEL MAID'

The Musical Numbers are as follows :
ACT I.
Introduction and Opening Chorus,
' This English Land '
Duet (Dorothy and Percy) and Chorus, ' In 1688'
Song (Derek), ' Home Again ' '
Song (Mary) and Chorus,' Sunshine and Laughter '
Quartet and Gavotte (Mary.
Dorothy, Percy and Derek). ' Shepherdess and Beau Brocade
Duet (Abigail and Solomon), ' When we get back to Dorset '
Song (Derek and Chorus), 'Unavailing little lady '
Song (Mary). ' When a dream of love you cherish'
Finale (Principals and Chorus), But stay, confession I should make
ACT II.
Song (Bunkle) and Male Chorus.
' We've searched the countryside '
Song (Abigail), ' I want my man to be a landlord '
Madrigal (Chorus), How strange this tumult '
Trio (Abigail. Solomon and Bunkle).
, Cautious'
Song (Mary), ' The old-fashioned cloak'
Chorus of Serving Maids, 'Serving maidens merry '
Duet (Solomon and Bunkle) and Male Chorus,
' Ho, ho, diddle dum'
Song (Mary and Chorus), ' Are my lanterns shining ? '
Finale (Principals and Chorus), ' Now, hold, can we not save ? "
ACT III.
Jig (Orchestra)
Opening Chorus, ' When the heart is blithe and jolly
Song (Derek) and Chorus, 'The Fishermen of England'
Song (Mary), ' Sail my Ships '
Madrigal (Chorus), ' Wisdom and Folly"
Duet (Mary and Derek), ' Now stand we on the summit of the hill'
Finale, ' They have come from over the Seas '
5XX Daventry

A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by POUISHNOFF
THIS performance of a striking pianoforte work is the second of that series, the first of which was devoted to Beethoven's Hammerklavier
Sonata. The works in this scries will be such as on account of their length do not come within the scope of ordinary programmes. They will be interpreted by players who bring to their interpretation high executive skill.
Liszt's Sonata, one of his few works without a 'programme,' was written in 1853 or 1854, and dedicated to Schumann.
The Sonata is in one continuous Movement, its themes undergoing changes of mood and its sections worked into a whole with ingenuity and power. It begins with a few bars of slow music containing a descending theme, and goes on to a quick, imperious tune which is almost at once joined by a bold knocking theme in the bass. Much peremptory challenging music is based on . these two ideas, and then the descending. originally slow figure returns, to bring in a grandiose hymn-like tune in a major key, accompanied by throbbing chords.
Soon we hear an expressive tune. beginning with five repeated notes, singing out aloft. This, it will be heard, is an example of Liszt's metamorphosis of themes, for it is the tune we heard in the bass, in another mood, soon af ten the quick part began.
We have now got hold of the chief material-the (at first slow) descending tune, the two that ' opened the ball' so energetically, and the broad hymn-like one. Easily to follow Liszt's dealings with them only requires familiarity with the work.
Its second main division is in three-time. Here the themes show themselves in richly sentimental vein, now peaceful, then impassioned. The descending theme of the Introduction again enters, leading us to the third and last section of the Sonata. Here begins some brisk, incisive fugal work, and with restatements of the themes we know, the work moves on to its end in a blaze of excitement. Just for a moment we hear a strain from the slow section, and then, very slowly, the descending theme of the Introduction brings down the curtain on the Sonata.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by POUISHNOFF
THIS performance of a striking pianoforte work is the second of that series, the first of which was devoted to Beethoven's Hammerklavier
Sonata. The works in this scries will be such as on account of their length do not come within the scope of ordinary programmes. They will be interpreted by players who bring to their interpretation high executive skill.
Liszt's Sonata, one of his few works without a 'programme,' was written in 1853 or 1854, and dedicated to Schumann.
The Sonata is in one continuous Movement, its themes undergoing changes of mood and its sections worked into a whole with ingenuity and power. It begins with a few bars of slow music containing a descending theme, and goes on to a quick, imperious tune which is almost at once joined by a bold knocking theme in the bass. Much peremptory challenging music is based on . these two ideas, and then the descending. originally slow figure returns, to bring in a grandiose hymn-like tune in a major key, accompanied by throbbing chords.
Soon we hear an expressive tune. beginning with five repeated notes, singing out aloft. This, it will be heard, is an example of Liszt's metamorphosis of themes, for it is the tune we heard in the bass, in another mood, soon af ten the quick part began.
We have now got hold of the chief material-the (at first slow) descending tune, the two that ' opened the ball' so energetically, and the broad hymn-like one. Easily to follow Liszt's dealings with them only requires familiarity with the work.
Its second main division is in three-time. Here the themes show themselves in richly sentimental vein, now peaceful, then impassioned. The descending theme of the Introduction again enters, leading us to the third and last section of the Sonata. Here begins some brisk, incisive fugal work, and with restatements of the themes we know, the work moves on to its end in a blaze of excitement. Just for a moment we hear a strain from the slow section, and then, very slowly, the descending theme of the Introduction brings down the curtain on the Sonata.
5XX Daventry

'SAMSON AND DELILAH'

ACT II
(Relayed from the Royal Opera
House, Covent Garden)
AT night, before her house in the lonely valley of Sorek, Delilah muses on her plot to be avenged on the Israelites. The High Priest comes to beg her to betray Samson, the Hebrew leader. She is only too ready to do so, to avenge her people. She determines to get from him the secret of his power.
Now a storm arises as Samson comes to
Delilah's dwelling. She exercises her arts of fascination upon him, but in the roll of the thunder Samson hoars the warning voice of God. Delilah spurns him and rushes into the house, but her work is done. for Samson cannot resist, and follows her. The Philistine soldiers now creep in, and in a few moments Delilah appears at the window holding Samson's shorn hair, and exclaiming: 'Tis done!' Samson, crying ' Betrayed ! ' is overcome and bound.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'SAMSON AND DELILAH'

ACT II
(Relayed from the Royal Opera
House, Covent Garden)
AT night, before her house in the lonely valley of Sorek, Delilah muses on her plot to be avenged on the Israelites. The High Priest comes to beg her to betray Samson, the Hebrew leader. She is only too ready to do so, to avenge her people. She determines to get from him the secret of his power.
Now a storm arises as Samson comes to
Delilah's dwelling. She exercises her arts of fascination upon him, but in the roll of the thunder Samson hoars the warning voice of God. Delilah spurns him and rushes into the house, but her work is done. for Samson cannot resist, and follows her. The Philistine soldiers now creep in, and in a few moments Delilah appears at the window holding Samson's shorn hair, and exclaiming: 'Tis done!' Samson, crying ' Betrayed ! ' is overcome and bound.
5XX Daventry

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY v. A.A.A.

A Commentary on the Athletic Meeting by Mr. H. M. ABRAHAMS
Relayed from Fenner's, Cambridge
With Interludes by the WIRELESS
MTLITARY BAND with FRANK Foxon (Baritone) and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE
THIS afternoon's athletic meeting has more interest than the usual contest between a University and an outside club. Since the war Cambridge has supplied an unusually high proportion of athletes to the British Olympic teams, and Fenner's is now recognized as one of the most likely places to which to look for cracks capable of holding their own in the best company the world can provide.
So this year the meeting between the Varsity and the Amateur Athletic Association has been arranged as a sort of Olympic test. Cambridge are to be strengthened by the addition of some of the star products of recent years, and their team will include such famous athletes as H. B. Stallard , the miler and half-miler, D. G. A. Lowe, who has already run for Great Britain at Colombes, C. T. van Geyzel, the high jumper from Ceylon, and those two fine hurdlers, Lord Burghley and G. C. Weightmann-Smith . The encounter between these cracks and the stiong team brought down by the A.A.A. should make a most thrilling afternoon's sport, which listeners will hear described by Mr. H. M. Abrahams, himself an old Cambridge runner, and a former victor in the Olympic Game?, an article by whom on this afternoon's meeting will be found on page 425.






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