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BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Robertson Hare
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley his choice of desert island records
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

John Snagge discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose
. to have with him on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
From the BBC Gramstand at the National Radio Show at Earls Court
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Charles Mackerras
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Lotte Lehmann
discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records she would choose to have on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Judy Grinham
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records she would choose to have with her if she were condemned to spend the rest of her life on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

John Osborne
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
See page 4
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures: The Individual and the Universe: 6: The Origin of the Universe (ii)

by A. C. B. Lovell, O.B.E., F.R.S., Professor of Radio Astronomy in the University of Manchester and Director of the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station.

Evolutionary theories of the origin of the universe, like that of Abbe Lemaitre, command a wide measure of support among contemporary astronomers. But they represent only one group of theories. An alternative is found in the steady slate theories. According to these the universe has always been as it is today and always will be. Throughout infinite space creation is going on continuously: now and always the primeval gas is being created from which the galaxies have evolved and are still evolving.
It is probably true to say that the main issue in present day cosmology is the conflict between the evolutionary and steady state theories. The difference between them is clearly fundamental and of the greatest importance to both science and philosophy.

These lectures will be printed in 'The Listener'
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures: The Individual and the Universe: 5: The Origin of the Universe (i)

by A. C. B. Lovell, O.B.E., F.R.S., Professor of Radio Astronomy in the University of Manchester and Director of the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station.

The astronomers' probing of the depths of the universe may soon have reached its limit. When observation reaches out to those immensely distant regions where the speed of recession of the galaxies approaches the speed of light, further penetration becomes impossible. Any scientific explanation of the universe must rely on what can be observed within those limits.
There are at present several theories which can attempt to explain the present state of the universe. The ones that command support among a great many contemporary astronomers are the evolutionary theories. The Abbe Lemaitre, for example, postulates a primeval atom which disintegrated between twenty and sixty thousand million years ago and thus started the process by which the universe evolved to its present state. Speculation about what was before this event takes us beyond the beginning of time, out of physics into metaphysics.
(These lectures will be printed in The Listener)
BBC Home Service Basic

Desert Island Discs

Elena Gerhardt (in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records she would choose to have on a desert island.
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Richard Dimbleby
discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Percy Kahn
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have with him if he were condemned to spend the rest of his life on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Elsie and Doris Waters
(in a recorded programme) discuss with Roy Plomley the gramophone records they would choose to have if they were condemned to spend the rest of their lives on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

Playback Dr. No

A conversation between Raymond Chandler and Ian Fleming.

The men behind Philip Marlowe and James Bond discuss some differences between English and American thrillers and compare their own latest books, 'Playback' and 'Dr. No'.
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Naomi Jacob
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records she would choose to have with her if she were condemned to spend the rest of her life on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Ben Lyon
(In a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have with him if he were condemned to spend the rest of his life on a desert island
Produced by Denys Jones
BBC Home Service Basic

Children's Hour

For Younger Listeners

'The Bronze Boot'
A serial play by Kate Munro
1 —On Board H.M.S. Nova Scotia
Produced by Kathleen Garscadden

5.30 For Older Children
Now Showing in London
A review by Eric Gillett of some of the new films and plays

5.50 The week's programmes
BBC Home Service Basic

DESERT ISLAND DISCS

Lupino Lane
(in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have with him if he were condemned to spend the rest of his life on a desert island
Produced by Monica Chapman
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures RUSSIA, THE ATOM AND THE WEST

by George F. Kennan
Professor of History at the Institute for Advanced Study
Princeton, N.J..
4-The Military Problem
In this lecture Mr. Kennan speaks about the effect which the possession of nuclear weapons by both Russia and the West has on Western military dispositions. He suggests a new approach to the defence of the Continental NATO countries.
Next Sunday:
The Non-European World
These Lectures are being printed in The Listener.
BBC Home Service Basic

The Reith Lectures RUSSIA, THE ATOM AND THE WEST

by George F. Kennan
Professor of History at the Institute for Advanced Study
Princeton, N.J.
3-The Problem of Eastern and Central Europe
In this lecture Mr. Kennan reviews the uncertainties and instabilities of Eastern and Central Europe. He suggests the basis of a policy for reducing the pressures of a dangerous situation.
Next Sunday: The Military Issues
These Lectures are being printed in The Listener.
BBC Home Service Basic

Desert Island Discs

Bransby Williams (in a recorded programme) discusses with Roy Plomley the gramophone records he would choose to have on a desert island.






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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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