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5XX Daventry

A Light Classical Concert

GWENYTH MISSELBROOKE (Pianoforte)
THE STRATTON STRING QUARTET:
GEORGE STRATTON (1st Violin) ; WILLIAM MANUEL (2nd Violin) ; LAURENCE LEONARD (Viola) ; JOHN MOORE
(Violoncello)
NOBODY had much chance of patronizing Beethoven-patronizing, that is, in the sense of condescension.' He was a proud, independent soul, fierily resentful of anything like patronage. But though he refused to follow precedent by becoming a Court official, and poured violent scorn on any man who offended him in the slightest (and on a good many who didn't), yet he had many true patrons among the nobility-Princes and Counts who continually helped him, and at whose houses he was frequently a guest.
One of the chief among these was
Prince von Razoumovsky, the Russian Ambassador at Vienna during many years. This nobleman formed a String Quartet which he supported, and which became famous. To him Beethoven, then in his prime, dedicated three of his finest String Quartets, of which this is one.
There are four Movements : (I) Slow (a mysterious Introduction whose long-sustained shifting harmonies hold us in prolonged suspense), then Quick; (2) Rather slow, in a gracious, singing style ; (3) Minuet; (4) Very fast.
IT was after taking part in a performance of this and other Quartets by Mozart with the composer Dittersdorf and a violoncellist friend, that Haydn said to Mozart's father, ' I assure you solemnly and as an honest man that I consider your son to be the greatest composer of whom I have ever heard.'
The Quartet is in four Movements : (1) Slow, then Quick ; (2) Slow, in a singing style ; (3) Minuet; (4) Very quick.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

GERTRUDE JOHNSON (Soprano)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE SICILIAN VESPERS made its first appearance, in French, at the Paris Opera in 1855, two years after II Trovatore and La Traviata had appeared at Rome and Venice respectively. The libretto, by Scribe, deals with the massacre of the French invaders in Sicily while they were at vespers on Easter Monday, 1282. The tale is a thrilling one, if somewhat sanguinary, and the opera is full of Verdi's inimitable charm, so that it is a little difficult to understand why it has fallen into such neglect. The Overture, however, still holds a warm place in the affections of music lovers, and must be too well known to need very much in the way of description.
It begins with a slow introduction in which a menacing figure on drums and strings forms the accompaniment to a sad tune for woodwinds. The main part of the Overture, in Allegro agitato, begins with astrenuous figure suggestingstrifeand warfare ; this is succeeded, after a silent pause, by a violoncello solo, one of the Verdi melodies which an audience goes away humming to itself. It leads to a march tune beginning very softly and gaining in strength and vigour until we have again a stormy episode. The violoncello melody is repeated, this time with the assistance of clarinets, and with a fuller accompaniment than before being transferred a little later to the violins ,and a strenuous prestissimo brings the Overture to its close.
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA, as all have had opportunities of discovering for themselves, is very different from opera of the conventional order; it is peculiarly English in form. The tale is by Gay, and the music consists almost entirely of songs and ballads of that date (the first quarter of the eighteenth century), all of them of that popular order, which means that people hum and sing and whistle them as they go about. They were chosen because of their popularity, and fitted into the scheme of the opera by Dr. Christopher Pepusch , whose only original contribution to the work was the Overture. In the whole work there are some seventy such popular tunes of the day, some of which are still well enough known to be recognized even by those who have not heard the opera. It had a successful run when it was first performed at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre in 1728 ; in a French version it was given in Paris in 1750.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

LIVIO MANNUCCI (Violoncello)
JOSEPH FARRINGTON (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THERE were two brothers Marcello, both of whom were important figures in their own day, but it is the younger, Benedetto, who is best remembered. A lawyer by profession, he held several important Government posts, and was a real scholar in more than one branch of learning. But in spite of heavy official duties, he found time to win distinction both in music and in literature, and his biggest work is still regarded as taking a very high place in the history of music. It consists of eight folio volumes of Psalms for one, two, three or more voices with figured bass, and sometimes with obbligatos for violins and violoncello. The collection was held in esteem not only in Marcello's native Italy, but elsewhere, and the whole eight volumes were published in an English edition in 1757. He wrote a good deal of instrumental music, too, as well as songs, madrigals, operas, cantatas, and at least one oratorio, furnishing the texts himself for all these last. He wrote besides on musical and other subjects, and many of the European libraries have interesting MSS. of his. To us, one of the most interesting is a Cantata Timotheusfor which the text is a translation by Marcello of Dryden's poem. It is in the State Library at Dresden. His music was so highly thought of even in his own day that it is odd to find our historian Burney speaking rather slightingly of it, suggesting that it had been too much praised and that it was not very original. Burney was so much more often carried away by his enthusiasms that it is odd to find him at variance with a contemporary verdict which history has whole-heartedly endorsed.
There is a monument to Marcello in the Church of San Giuseppe at Brescia, recording his achievements as statesman, musician and poet. It is almost solely as musician that we hold him in grateful remembrance now.
EVEN in its original form as pianoforte music, the piece by the Russian composer Liadov contrives to give an excellent imitation of an old musical toy-a musical snuff-box which produced little tinkling tunes. In this arrangement, the Glockenspiel and other delicate-toned instruments of the band have even less difficulty in bringing off the same illusion. Apart, however, from its interest as an imitation, it is a charming little piece, dainty and melodious.
HOLST is one of the comparatively few modern
English composers who have shown a real interest in the value of Military Band music, by composing specially for it.
This Suite is in three movements. The first is a Chaconne, a modern treatment of an old form in which the music is built up of one phrase repeated over and over, generally in the bass, although occasionally in other parts, and with constantly varied treatment and interest. The second is a melodious and graceful intermezzo, and the third is a lively and vigorous March with a thoroughly popular march tune.

Dramatic Overture, ' Phedre ' - Massenet
JOSEPH FARRINGTON Woo thou thy Snowflake ('Ivanhoe ') - Sullivan
The Two Grenadiers - Schumann
BAND Fantasia from the Ballet, 'Coppélia' - Delibes
LIVIO MANNUCCI Largo - Marcello, arr. F. Pollain
Le Papillon (The Butterfly) - Caix d'Hervelois, arr. F. Pollain
BAND Russian Peasant Dance, ' Kukuska ' - Lehar
A Musical Snuffbox - Liadov
JOSEPH FARRINGTON Two Scottish Airs:O were I on Parnassus Hill - arr. Henschel
Gae bring to me - arr. George Short
BAND First Suite Chaconne ; Intermezzo; March - Holst
LIVIO MANNUCCI Rhapsodie - Popper
BAND Six Waltzes, Op. 39 (First Selection) - Brahms, arr. Gerrard Williams
5XX Daventry

Dr. THOMAS GANN: In Search of a Treasure Temple in Central America '

THE wilds of Central America conceal the relics of an elaborate civilization now vanished, and the ruins of cities which have been without inhabitants for hundreds of years. Modern exploration holds no more exciting story than that of the attempt to unveil the secrets of these old civilizations. Dr. Thomas Gann has now for many years been on their trail. In this talk, and in another that he will give on Monday next week, he will tell some of the talos of the determined attempt that modem science is making to discover any traces that may remain of the great cities whoso doom was sealed when the Spaniards entered the Now World.
5XX Daventry

A BRASS BAND CONCERT

S.B. from Newcastle
Artists from the London Studio
GARDA HALL (Soprano)
WATCYN WATCYNS (Baritone) The MARSDEN COI.LIERY BAND
Conducted by JACK BODDICE
THE Brass Band came into being originally as a mounted band, most of the instruments being easier to manipulate in one hand, while the player holds the bridle rein with the other, than the woodwinds would have been. The French call it a 'Fanfare,' applying the same term to a cavalry band on mounted duty. It has naturally not the same fullness and variety as the complete Military Band, but can produce very rich, sonorous tone with gradations of quality and strength which are remarkable when one knows its limitations. In this country, almost more than anywhere else, brass bands have long been popular apart from any military use, and many societies and industrial concerns have their own brass bands, which often reach a very high pitch of excellence. Our British brass band contests are unique in their own way.
VON SUPPE, best known to us by such evergreen favourites as the Overtures Poet and Peasant and Light Cavalry, wrote for the light opera stage with such tireless industry that, according to one authority, he left the amazing number of 165 light operas and smaller works, as well as at least two grand operas. Boccaccio was one of the comparatively few which were heard in London. It was given here at the Comedy Theatre in 1882, and was warmly welcomed. The music is full of that charm and brightness which we associate with the Viennese stage, and though only the Overture is now played, it, at least, bids fair to keep its place as a favourite concert piece.
It is interesting to note that Suppe anticipated
Lilac Time by a little opera which he called Franz Schubert , and in which some of Schubert's own melodies were incorporated.
DELIBES' most successful Grand Opera was broadcast at the end of February, so that listeners had an opportunity of deciding for themselves whether or not he was as successful in that serious vein as he is with Ballets and similar light music. In his own day there was no doubt at all about the popularity of his Ballets and of some of his lighter stage pieces, but like many men who have won success in that way, he was anxious to achieve a similar position on the serious opera stage, an ambition which he only partially realized. Suites or Selections from the music of three of his Ballets are frequently played—Sylvia, Coppelia, and La Source (The Fountain)—and it would be difficult to say which of the three is the most popular. All are tuneful and melodious with that lightness of touch and airy grace which we call French, and all lend themselves well to arrangement for military band and in other ways.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHAMBER MUSIC

THE LONDON STRING QUARTET : JOHNPEN-NINGTON(1st Violin); THOMAS PETRE (2nd Violin) ; .. H. WALDO WARNER(Viola) ;
C. Warwick Evans (Violoncello)
ROBERT MAITLAND(Baritone)
BEETHOVEN'S last Quartets, of which thiis one, represent the matured mind of the master at work upon problems of expression in which ho attained heights that no musician had before aspired to reach. We find him. in his search for a deeper, fuller exposition of his thoughts, sometimes adapting and moulding the old forms anew, and even breaking the moulds altogether and creating new ones to hold his ever- widening ideas.
In the C Sharp Minor Quartet (written in 1826 a few months before Beethoven's death), there are seven Movements, several of them containing quick changes of mood. All are to be played without a break.
The FIRST MOVEMENT (Slow and very ex pressive) is a Fugue. When this has been ex pounded in simple style, the tune on which it is based is given out by the First Violin twice as quickly as at first, and a little episode' is built up. Later, the tune is heard in the ’Cello, in notes twice as long as at first. Soon after, the Movement comes to a long-held note and a pause, and so begins tho
SECOND MOVEMENT (Very quick and lively).
This straightforward piece of energetic music is followed by the ' THIRD MOVEMENT (Moderately, fast); .which is really only a few bars in declamatory style, bringing in the FOURTHMOVEMENT (Rather slow and in a singing style), a set of Variations on'a graceful, engaging theme.
FIFTH MOVEMENT(Very quick). The Scherzo, a ripe piece of jesting, full of quips and cranks, and of tremendous energy.
SIXTH MOVEMENT (Slow). Again a very short
Movement, that says much in few notes, and goes deep.
In the SEVENTH MOVEMENT(Quick) we feel once more Beethoven's elemental power, and something' of the introspection' that grew upon him. This is big music in every sense, and perhaps in some ways music to which one needs to grow gradually if one is to get into really to grow gradually,if one is to get into really close touch with the tender, far-seeing and farther-hoping humanity of the spirit behind it.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Mr. G. M. TREVELYAN: 'A Glance into Bygone England'

A MONGST the small band of historians who, without martyring truth upon an altar of epigram, do make history good reading, Mr. G. M. Trevelyan holds a high place. He has written much on Italian history of the Risorgimento and on British history in the nineteenth century, and ho published a 'History of England' last year. In tonight's talk he will give listeners a few glimpses into the England that vanished in the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century-the England that Cobbett elegized, that Gay held up the mirror to, that Hogarth satirized.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

THE GLORIOUS GUILD of INDISPENSABLE MEMBERS
OF THE COMMUNITY will hold its
Annual Outing on Tuesday, October 23, 1928
(N.B.-The Proceedings will be Broadcast, so Members are asked to be on their Best Behaviour)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Light Classical Concert

GWENYTH MISSELBROOKE (Pianoforte)
THE STRATTON STRING QUARTET:
GEORGE STRATTON (1st Violin) ; WILLIAM MANUEL (2nd Violin) ; LAURENCE LEONARD (Viola) ; JOHN MOORE
(Violoncello)
NOBODY had much chance of patronizing Beethoven-patronizing, that is, in the sense of condescension.' He was a proud, independent soul, fierily resentful of anything like patronage. But though he refused to follow precedent by becoming a Court official, and poured violent scorn on any man who offended him in the slightest (and on a good many who didn't), yet he had many true patrons among the nobility-Princes and Counts who continually helped him, and at whose houses he was frequently a guest.
One of the chief among these was
Prince von Razoumovsky, the Russian Ambassador at Vienna during many years. This nobleman formed a String Quartet which he supported, and which became famous. To him Beethoven, then in his prime, dedicated three of his finest String Quartets, of which this is one.
There are four Movements : (I) Slow (a mysterious Introduction whose long-sustained shifting harmonies hold us in prolonged suspense), then Quick; (2) Rather slow, in a gracious, singing style ; (3) Minuet; (4) Very fast.
IT was after taking part in a performance of this and other Quartets by Mozart with the composer Dittersdorf and a violoncellist friend, that Haydn said to Mozart's father, ' I assure you solemnly and as an honest man that I consider your son to be the greatest composer of whom I have ever heard.'
The Quartet is in four Movements : (1) Slow, then Quick ; (2) Slow, in a singing style ; (3) Minuet; (4) Very quick.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

Little Wortleberry holds its ' Feast' -as it always does on Whit
Monday
On this occasion we shall be there. So will the WIRELESS SINGERS
(Directed by STANFORD ROBINSON ) and tho OLOF SEXTET
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Professor COCK : 'The Limits of Lying.' S.B. from Bournemouth

THE Devil was known to our ancestors as the -L Father of Lies, and lying has always been regarded by the moralists as one of the cardinal vices on which others turn. On the other hand, lying may be vigorously defended from the social or the worldly points of view, and some of the most attractive characters seem incapable of telling the literal truth. Professor Cock holds the Chair of Education and Philosophy at University College, Southampton, and he is qualified to deal with this intriguing subject in an authoritatively philosophical vein.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Miss LILIAN BRAITHWAITE : ' The British Red Cross Society '

ON Thursday this week tho British Red Cross
Society will hold its first flag day since 1918. The reason for this is that the great work done by the Society during the war is now being approached in scale by its efforts to cope with the new dangers ' of the road. Both the Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem have organized special patrols and first-aid posts at various danger points on the great highways, and many besides motorists, will bo interested to hear further details of their campaign against a peril that assumes greater dimensions as traffic grows.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A BRASS BAND CONCERT

S.B. from Newcastle
Artists from the London Studio
GARDA HALL (Soprano)
WATCYN WATCYNS (Baritone) The MARSDEN COI.LIERY BAND
Conducted by JACK BODDICE
THE Brass Band came into being originally as a mounted band, most of the instruments being easier to manipulate in one hand, while the player holds the bridle rein with the other, than the woodwinds would have been. The French call it a 'Fanfare,' applying the same term to a cavalry band on mounted duty. It has naturally not the same fullness and variety as the complete Military Band, but can produce very rich, sonorous tone with gradations of quality and strength which are remarkable when one knows its limitations. In this country, almost more than anywhere else, brass bands have long been popular apart from any military use, and many societies and industrial concerns have their own brass bands, which often reach a very high pitch of excellence. Our British brass band contests are unique in their own way.
VON SUPPE, best known to us by such evergreen favourites as the Overtures Poet and Peasant and Light Cavalry, wrote for the light opera stage with such tireless industry that, according to one authority, he left the amazing number of 165 light operas and smaller works, as well as at least two grand operas. Boccaccio was one of the comparatively few which were heard in London. It was given here at the Comedy Theatre in 1882, and was warmly welcomed. The music is full of that charm and brightness which we associate with the Viennese stage, and though only the Overture is now played, it, at least, bids fair to keep its place as a favourite concert piece.
It is interesting to note that Suppe anticipated
Lilac Time by a little opera which he called Franz Schubert , and in which some of Schubert's own melodies were incorporated.
DELIBES' most successful Grand Opera was broadcast at the end of February, so that listeners had an opportunity of deciding for themselves whether or not he was as successful in that serious vein as he is with Ballets and similar light music. In his own day there was no doubt at all about the popularity of his Ballets and of some of his lighter stage pieces, but like many men who have won success in that way, he was anxious to achieve a similar position on the serious opera stage, an ambition which he only partially realized. Suites or Selections from the music of three of his Ballets are frequently played—Sylvia, Coppelia, and La Source (The Fountain)—and it would be difficult to say which of the three is the most popular. All are tuneful and melodious with that lightness of touch and airy grace which we call French, and all lend themselves well to arrangement for military band and in other ways.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Dr. THOMAS GANN: In Search of a Treasure Temple in Central America '

THE wilds of Central America conceal the relics of an elaborate civilization now vanished, and the ruins of cities which have been without inhabitants for hundreds of years. Modern exploration holds no more exciting story than that of the attempt to unveil the secrets of these old civilizations. Dr. Thomas Gann has now for many years been on their trail. In this talk, and in another that he will give on Monday next week, he will tell some of the talos of the determined attempt that modem science is making to discover any traces that may remain of the great cities whoso doom was sealed when the Spaniards entered the Now World.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

GERTRUDE JOHNSON (Soprano)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE SICILIAN VESPERS made its first appearance, in French, at the Paris Opera in 1855, two years after II Trovatore and La Traviata had appeared at Rome and Venice respectively. The libretto, by Scribe, deals with the massacre of the French invaders in Sicily while they were at vespers on Easter Monday, 1282. The tale is a thrilling one, if somewhat sanguinary, and the opera is full of Verdi's inimitable charm, so that it is a little difficult to understand why it has fallen into such neglect. The Overture, however, still holds a warm place in the affections of music lovers, and must be too well known to need very much in the way of description.
It begins with a slow introduction in which a menacing figure on drums and strings forms the accompaniment to a sad tune for woodwinds. The main part of the Overture, in Allegro agitato, begins with astrenuous figure suggestingstrifeand warfare ; this is succeeded, after a silent pau-e, by a violoncello solo, one of the Verdi melodies which an audience goes away humming to itself. It leads to a march tune beginning very softly and gaining in strength and vigour until we have again a stormy episode. The violoncello melody is repeated, this time with the assistance of clarinets, and with a fuller accompaniment than before being transferred a little later to the violins ,and a strenuous prestissimo brings the Overture to its close.
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA, as all have had opportunities of discovering for themselves, is very different from opera of the conventional order; it is peculiarly English in form. The tale is by Gay, and the music consists almost entirely of songs and ballads of that date (the first quarter of the eighteenth century), all of them of that popular order, which means that people hum and sing and whistle them as they go about. They were chosen because of their popularity, and fitted into the scheme of the opera by Dr. Christopher Pepusch , whose only original contribution to the work was the Overture. In the whole work there are some seventy such popular tunes of the day, some of which are still well enough known to be recognized even by those who have not heard the opera. It had a successful run when it was first performed at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre in 1728 ; in a French version it was given in Paris in 1750.
5XX Daventry

Mr. T. H. BAXTER, ' Filming through Africa '

DESPITE the inroads of civilization, Africa and its peoples still retain many age-old customs and ways of life. Mr. Baxter, the Secretary of the Missionary Film Committee, who was responsible for that very interesting film, ' India Today,' has recently returned from a journey, with a well-known camera-man, from the Cape to Kenya, ' shooting ' the real life of the real African. The best of the filma that he secured, often under trying and even dangerous conditions, will be shown in London at the end of the month.
7.0 (Daventry only) Prof. W. M.
THORNTON, ' The Swan Memorial Lecture.' S.B. from Newcastle rIS lecture is in memory of Sir Joseph Swan , the great
English physicist and electrician, who died in 1914. Bora in Sunderland nearly a century ago, Swan was a partner in a Newcastle firm of manufacturing chemists, and it was for them that he invented a process of photographic printing that is the foundation of methods in use today; whilst in the invention of electric lamps he forestalled Edison. He gave the first public exhibition of electric lighting on a large scale at Newcastle in 1880. Professor Thornton holds the chair of Electrical Engineering at Armstrong College, and is a Vice-President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.
5XX Daventry

Sir ATUL CHATTERJEE: 'The League and the Far East'

THE ever-increasing industrialization of the East constitutes an important problem in the world organization of today, and it is significant that Sir Atnl Chatterjee , tho High Commissioner for India in London, should bo this year's President of the International Labour Organization of the League of Nations—the first non-European to hold that office. The I.L.O. is likely to bo brought into increasing contact with the East in future years, and, as one who has been prominently identified with the study of industrial problems there. Sir Atnl is in a position' to exert an important influence on the relations between the Far East and the League.
5XX Daventry

NEW LIGHT ORCHESTRAL WORKS

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL (First performance of a new suite by a com poser whose works have established themselves as among the best contemporary light music ') (Leo Peter is a young writer whose admittedly light music deftly combines delicacy of touch and distinction of fancy with ' popularity') Cracker Dance: A Prim Gavotte : Country
Dance (The characters in ' The Tale of a Shoe,' libretto by Rodney Bennett, are all well-known nursery rhyme figures, the shoe itself being that formerly occupied by the Old Woman, but in the play taken over by Mother Hubbard as the premises for a Boarding-school. The Cracker Dance takes place in a Christmas Party ; the Prim Gavotte is a dance by Polly Flinders upon the discovery that she is really a Princess ; the Country Dance is a general jollification. The work is scored for a chamber orchestra, percussion, and piano) (A new work by a composer whose work ineducational music is known to young and old alike, and whose more serious work, of which this is a recent example, is always interesting) Conducted by the Composer
Suggested by Thomas Burke's ' Nights in Town ' and ' The London Spy '
1. —Morning. (Buses and trams. Hum of city's morning life. Traffic hold-up. Gears and brakes. Bus ride past Hyde Park)
2.—Chinatown. (West India Dock Road. Asiatics' Home. Chinese guitar and reed instruments. Outside waterside tavern. Automatic piano. Sing-song inside tavern. Russian, English, Chinese, Spanish, Scandinavian Sailors.
Sea shanties and dance. Back to ship)
3.-The Ghetto. (The plaint of the Wandering Jew. Petticoat Lane Sunday morning. Rachel and Cohen. Noise of stalls and market. Church bells ringing against the voices of caged birds. Banter and chaff. Through it all the sad shuffle of the Wandering Jew)
4.-Who Goes Home ? (Crowds from theatres. Search for taxis. Revellers. ' 'We won't go home till morning.' In the Strand. Last Strains of supper-dance bands. Sunrise on Embankment. Boat coming through mist. Lorries going to Covent Garden and Smithneld.
The first soft beginnings of the day's crescendo of noise.)
5XX Daventry

A LIGHT ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA, conducted by JOHN ANSELL
THE plot of the Opera Euryanthe was made out of a thirteenth-century tale of knightly doings, full also of ghosts, fairies and suchlike legendary folk. The work did not hold the stage; its libretto was too silly, even for those days. But the Overture found and retained a place on the concert platform. In it, Weber strikes the notes oi chivalry and mystery. According to his characteristic plan, it contains fragments of the Opera's leading airs.
5XX Daventry

Herr EMIL LUDWIG: 'Bismarck '

MONGST historians of the modern type,
A whoso books are as lively and readable as most novels, Emil Ludwig holds a high place. His books on 'Napoleon,' 'Bismarck' and ' Kaiser Wilhelm ' have aroused much interest in England, and the two latter especially have given a new interpretation of the most keenly debated questions in modern political history.






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