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BBC Television

Mainly for Women

Twice Twenty
A magazine for older women.
Beryl Mason talks to W. Macqueen-Pope about the good old days of 'The Merry Widow' and June Bronhill sings old favourites as arranged for the new production at Sadler's Wells Theatre.
Mrs. Doris Potton tells of her experiences and excitements in a career of cookery which she started at the age of forty and Lionel Marson shows unusual and exotic fish and fowl from this year's National Exhibition of Cage Birds and Aquaria.

3.15 Talk It Over
Arranged and introduced by The Rev. Gladys Smith.

(to 15.30)
5XX Daventry

Hansel and Gretel

A Fairy Opera
In Three Acts, by Adelheid Wette
Translated and adapted into English by Constace Bache
Music composed by Engelbert Humperdinck
Chorus of Children
The Wireless Chorus
Chorus-Master, Stanford Robinson
The Wireless Symphony Orchestra
(Leader, S. Kneale Kelley)
Under the direction of Percy Pitt
ACT I
Scene 1. At Home. In a poor room the boy Hänsel (Mezzo-Soprano) and the girl Gretel (Soprano) are seen. They complain of hunger.
"O Gretel, it would be such a treat, If we had something nice to eat,
Eggs and butter and suet paste,
I've almost forgotten how they taste."
So sings Hansel, and Gretel tries to cheer him by showing him a jug of milk, out of which their mother, when she returns, will make a blancmange. Hansel cannot wait. He begins to taste it.
Gretel then tries to keep her troublesome young brother out of mischief by giving him a dancing lesson, and the children sing as they dance.
The fun gets noisier, and then, when it is at its height, in comes the Mother (Contralto), whereupon - sudden quiet! She scolds the children for neglecting their work, and, in her anger, accidentally overturns the jug of milk which was to have provided the family supper.
Weary and distracted, she drives the children out to gather wild strawberries, and, with a prayer for help, drops asleep, exhausted.
A gay song is heard, and there enters the Father (Baritone). The Mother awakes and expresses her discouragement ; the Father goes on merrily singing, and at last shows the cause of his happiness. He has sold the brooms he had made, and bought ham and butter and flour and sausages and vegetables and tea - such provision as the cottage has not seen for many a long day.
Then the Father asks where the children are, and on learning that they have (so near night-fall!) gone into the forest, he is alarmed. He talks, shuddering, of magic, and sings an eerie song of a 'gobbling ogress,' who lures children and bakes them in her oven.
With a cry, the Mother, wrought up by this narrative, rushes out of the door to save her children, and the Father follows.
ACT II
The Forest Sunset. The children are seen, Gretel making a garland of wild roses, Hansel looking for strawberries. Gretel sings a quiet song, "There stands a little man in the wood alone." Hansel takes up the garland, and crowns her as Queen of the Wood. He, courtier-like, presents her with his basket of strawberries; they both begin to eat. The Cuckoo is heard, and the children sing an old song about him.
A friendly quarrel arises. Hansel snatches the basket and finishes off the strawberries. Gretel, horror-struck, reproaches him. It begins to grow dark.
Soon the light has quite gone. The children are frightened. They see faces grinning from every tree. Hansel calls, and echo answers. The children crouch together.
The Sandman (Soprano) quietly creeps to the children, singing his song. He strews sand in their eyes. Half asleep, they sing their evening prayer.
Regional Programme London

The Amateur Highwayman

A Musical Melodrama
Book and lyrics by Raymond Newell
Music by Michael North
Cast Orchestra under the direction of Rae Jenkins
The programme produced by William MacLurg
The scene is a little village somewhere in England and the time the good old days
Here is a programme written in the very best traditions of old-world melodrama-a story redolent of dispossessed tenantry, innocent rustic beauty, and villainy of the deepest and most conventional dye.
The wicked squire of this village of yesterday is known, in the words of his own song, as ' ... the villain, the menace, the cur
With a sneer and a twisting lip,
With sleek black hair. and curled moustache,
On a horse, with a riding whip.'
He loved the pretty young Widow Melvin , and, being refused, plans to turn her from her cottage. However, her daughter, the village belle, with the help of her lover, as upright a young blacksmith as ever strode a village green, rescues her from her plight and sends the squire packing to the tune of his diminishing ' Ah-ha's '.
A curious coincidence attaches to the authors of this musical melodrama. Raymond Newell , who, in his own words, has sung on the radio for fourteen years. in shows ranging from opera to concert party, studied as a youngster under Dr. Fred Wadely, now Organist of Carlisle Cathedral. Dr. Wadely is now married to- the sister of Michael North , who is responsible for the music this afternoon. North and Newell have been friends for many years, but this is the first time that they have collaborated in this way. Raymond Newell himself has had the idea of writing a radio show for some time, and it represents his first achievement in this line.
5GB Daventry (Experimental)

Manon

(By arrangement with Miss Florence Glossop-Harris)
A Dramatic Opera in Five Acts. The music is by Jules Massenet, the libretto by H. Meilhac and P. Gille, after Marcel Prevost'sS 'Manon Lescaut.' The opera was first produced at the Opera Comique, Paris, in January, 1884.
The English version used by the British National Opera Company is one specially prepared for them by Mr. Edward Agate. The Producer is Mr. Frederick Austin.
First performance by the British National Opera Company.
Relayed from The Theatre Royal, Glasgow
The Cast is as follows:
During intervals between the Acts, Maud Gill will give Readings from the Birmingham Studio.
Act I
THE scene is the courtyard of an inn at Amiens in 1821. Guillot de Morfontaine, Minister of Finance (Bass) and de Bretigny, a nobleman (Baritone) have just arrived. Lescaut, of the Royal Guard (Baritone) comes up in a coach. He is awaiting Manon, his cousin (Soprano), whom he is to take to a convent school. She soon arrives, and Guillot approaches her and hints that he would like to make her further acquaintance. After a little, the Chevalier des Grieux (Tenor) enters. He instantly falls in love with Manon, and they run away to Paris in Guillot's coach.
ACT II
The scene is the new home of des Grieux and Manon, in Paris. He writes to his father, asking that he may marry Manon.
Lescaut and de Bretigny enter, the latter disguised as a soldier. Lescaut asks if des Grieux will marry Manon, and the young man shows the letter he has just written. De Bretigny privately tells Manon that her ]over's father is shocked at his son's conduct, and intends to have him waylaid and taken away. He also tells her that she can have a far finer home than this, if she wishes. After the two visitors have gone there is a noise outside. It is made by the men who have been sent to abduct Manon's lover. The love of pleasure prevails, and she says nothing to warn him. Des Grieux goes out, is seized and carried off.
ACT III
Scene 1 is a pleasure park on a felc day. Manon is walking with her new lover, Bretigny. The old Count des Grieux (Bass), father of her former lover, enters and tells Bretigny that his son is about to take holy orders. Manon decides to go to him.
Scene 2 is the Parlour of the Seminary of St. Sulpice. The elder des Grieux tries unsuccessfully to dissuade his son from becoming a priest. But Manon wins him from his purpose.
ACT IV
A gambling house in Paris. Manon and des Grieux enter, and Manon, who is in need of money, encourages her lover to play for high stakes. He does so, and wins much money from Guillot. After a while, the chagrined loser accuses des Grieux of cheating, and summons the police, who arrest the lovers.
ACT V
The scene is the road to Havre. Des Grieux has been tried, with Manon, and freed, but she has been condemned to exile. Des Grieux sadly awaits, with Lescaut, the coining of the prisoners, on their way to the port of embarkation. They enter, Manon among them. The guards, bribed, allow the exhausted girl to remain behind whilst the others are urged on their way. She utters her farewell to her lover, and dies in his arms.
5GB Daventry (Experimental)

'THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR'

A Comic Opera in Three Acts (After Shakespeare's
Comedy)
Music by OTTO NICOLAI
Recitations by HEINRICH PROCH
English Text by D. MILLAR CRAIG
Characters :
Servants, Revellers, Citizens of Windsor
THE WIRELESS CHORUS (Chorus-Master,
STANFORD ROBINSON )
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Leader. S. KNEALE KELLEY ). under the direction of PERCY PITT.
ACT I
Sc. 1. A Courtyard
Sc. 2. A Room in Ford's House
ACT II
Sc. 1. A Room in the Garter Inn
Sc. 2. The Garden behind Page's House
Sc. 3. A Room in Ford's House
ACT III
Sc. 1. A Room in Page's House.
Sc. 2. Herne's Oak.

THE MERRY WIVES, Nicolai's gay Opera based on Shakespeare's comedy, was produced in 1849, only a couple of months before the composer's death at tho age of thirty-nine.

The Overture, one of our favourite concert pieces, gives us a glimpse of the many doings in the Opera.

Act I

Scene 1. A courtyard before the houses of Page (left) and Ford (right)

MISTRESS FORD comes out of her house with a love-letter from Falstaff, the 'pompous impudence’ of which annoys her. She meets Mistress Page, who also has had a love-letter from the knight. They determine to hatch a plot for bringing him into public ridicule, and go off to begin upon it. Now come in Ford, Page, Slender, and Dr. Caius. The two latter are rivals for the hand of Anne, Page's daughter. The father favours Slender, the mother, Caius. Ford is unable to hear the name of woman without showing how jealous he is of anyone's paying attention to his wife.

The young man, Fenton, begs a word with Page. He also seeks the hand of Anne, and pleads his cause to her father. But he is poor, and Slender's wealth pleads much more potently. Page refuses to allow the youth to go near his daughter, but Fenton declares he will win her.

Scene 2. A room in Ford's house

Mistress Ford and Mistress Pago have planned their revenge on Falstaff, and are met to entrap him, and at the same time to punish Ford for his silly jealousy. Mistress Page has sent an anonymous letter to Ford, telling him that if he will appear at a certain time, he will surprise his wife with a lover. The two have also sent Falstaff a message saving that he is to come to Ford's house.

Now Mistress Pago hides, and Falstaff bounces in and would embrace Mistress Ford, whilst Mistress Page quietly slips out, and in a few moments knocks at the door in agitation. She is let in, and tells Mistress Ford that her husband is suspicious, and is coming to search the room. Mistress Page pretends great surprise at seeing Sir John there, and charges him with sending love-letters to her as well. He admits it, and swears he loves her too. The two ladies help him to hide in a basket of clothes. Then Mistress Ford calls her servants and tells. them to take it to the washing pool; in a whisper she adds, 'Throw it in the deepest place.’ As the men are raising the basket, in comes Page, with Ford, Slender, Caius, and other friends and onlookers. Ford declares his wife false to him, and storms away to search other rooms. When he comes back, his wife pretends to be heartbroken, and upbraids him. He is forced to beg her forgiveness.

ACT II

Scene I. A room in the Garter Inn. Next day.

Falstaff is in a dismal mood, after being soused in the washing pool. A servant brings him a note from Mistress Ford, making another appointment, for a time when her husband will be out hunting. The ever-hopeful knight is at once gay again. After he has had a brief drinking contest with some cronies, a waiter brings him a note from a cavalier, one Brook, who would see him. Brook is really Ford in disguise. He tells Falstaff a tale of being in love with 'one Mistress Ford’, whom he is afraid to approach; but if Falstaff will go to her, she surely cannot resist so gallant a lover. Brook argues that if Falstaff can persuade her to put aside her lofty superiority to lovers, then he, Brook, may the better urge his suit afterwards, if he lets her know that he is aware of her having one lover. (At every other sentence he is reviling the knight in an aside, whilst flattering him aloud.) Falstaff tells the tale of his adventures at Ford's house yesterday, and of his escape in the basket. Ford is nearly beside himself with smothered rage when he hears that his wife has made another appointment with the knight. The two go off together, the one to meet the lady and the other to spy upon the meeting.

Scene 2. The garden behind Page's house.

The timid Slender has come to pay court to Anne Page. So has the brisk Dr. Caius. Slender hears him and hides. In turn Caius, hearing. Fenton singing as he comes along, hides. Anne comes out and greets her lover, whilst Slender, and Caius peep out and dance with rage at hearing themselves ridiculed.

Scene 3. A room in Ford's House.

Mistress Ford and Falstaff enter. She has condoled with the knight for his sufferings, and he has no suspicions. Again Mistress Page knocks and tells them that Ford has learnt of yesterday's trick, and is coming to have vengeance on all concerned. Falstaff is in terror. Mistress Ford bethinks herself of a frock left by the fat wife of Brentford, her maid's aunt. They hustle Falstaff out to put it on, and a moment later Ford comes in, in a cold rage. He would search the other room. His wife forbids him, and stands before the door. His rage boils up, and just then the servants bring in the linen-basket. Thinking that the same trick is being tried again, he dashes at it and drags out the clothes; but no Falstaff is there.

Now Caius and the neighbour come in, and Ford, working himself into a frenzy, insists on entering the next room. Very well, says his wife, and calls to Mistress Pago to 'bring the poor old woman out.' Ford has forbidden the fat wife to come to the house, and as she totters out, he beats her.

Act III

Scene I. A room in Page's House.

Master and Mistress Ford, Master and Mistress - Page and Anne are together. Poor Ford, deceived again, begs his wife's forgiveness for his jealousy. He has been told of Falstaff's love-letter and of the women's plot to fool the knight. Now they are all in council to punish him thoroughly. Mistress Page recalls to them the legend of Herne the Hunter who, for slaying a stag by the holy oak in Windsor Park, was condemned to go hunting as a ghost for ever. Falstaff is to be told to come to the oak by night, disguised as Herne, and then a crowd of friends and children, in disguise, is to belabour him soundly. Mistress Page, in addition, has a little plot of her own for getting her way about her daughter's marriage. She intends that Anne shall marry Dr. Caius, and bids the girl dress as a red elf. (by which Caius will know her). After Mistress Page has gone out, her husband comes to Anne with his plot - that she shall be married to the man of his choice - Slender. She is to appear in the revels as a green elf, so that Slender can recognize her. Anne puts her spoke into the wheel by sending the costume of the red elf to Slender and that of tho green one to Caius - so that each of them will believe the other is herself. But Fenton shall be let into the secret, for he is to wed her, and no other.

Scene 2. Herne's Oak.

Falstaff, disguised as Herne, comes on; Mistress Ford and Mistress Page greet him affectionately, to his great delight. But soon there is an outcry, and the revellers, disguised as elves and ghosts, appear, with Anne as Titania. Falstaff is found and dragged forward. He falls down before Page, whilst other revellers, disguised as gnats, wasps, flies, and so on, with silver darts, come and dance round poor Falstaff.

Caius and Slender, as green and red elves, enter from opposite sides. They mistake* each other for Anne, and embrace, whilst Falstaff roars for mercy. Disguises are thrown off, and the knight sees how he has been tricked. The two wives insist that their lords must grant the young lovers their blessing, and all ends in merriment.
BBC Home Service Basic

CHILDREN'S HOUR

For Children of Most Ages presenting in Six Day Special
'Jim Starling by E. W. Hildick
Adapted as a serial for radio by Muriel Levy
1—' The Slasher'
Production by Herbert Smith
See Junior Radio Times
6.15 Viera with her guitar presents
Songs from Many Lands
5.30 For Older Children
Now Showing in London
A review by Eric Gillett of some of the new films and plays
5.50 The week's programmes
BBC One London

Film Preview

A look at the films showing on BBC-tv and the new releases in the cinema.
with Philip Jenkinson who introduces scenes from:
Beloved Infidel - Gregory Peck, Deborah Kerr
Lullaby of Broadway - Doris Day
Stop! You're Killing Me - Broderick Crawford
Fahrenheit 451 - Julie Christie, Oskar Werner by courtesy of Rank
Is Paris Burning? - Anthony Perkins, Leslie Caron
Promise Her Anything - Leslie Caron, Warren Beatty by courtesy of Paramount
Also featuring an interview with Leslie Caron in the studio.

10.47-11.12 No Turning Back
The story of Michael Taylor.
(Oxford, Peterborough, Manningtree, Cambridge)

10.47-11.12 The Founder
The story of Lancing College.
(Rowridge, Brighton)
BBC Two England

Film of the Week: Little Murders

continues the season of films of the 70s. starring
Elliott Gould Marcia Rodd
' Why are you the way you are, rather than the way you have to be? ' Photographer Alfred Cham berlain is asked this question - among many others-by his new wife Patsy, whose mission in life is to ' mould ' him. Alongside this story of attack on the rights of the individual, Jules Feiffer has written a brutally savage satire on the American way of life. The setting is present-day New York, a city disintegrating under a series of power failures, muggings, random snipers, obscene 'phone calls and 345 unsolved murders in six months ...
Directed by ALAN ARKIN
(First showing on British television) Films; page 12
BBC Two England

Film of the Week: The Heartbreak Kid

starring
Charles Grodin , Cybill Shepherd Jeannie Berlin, Eddie Albert
Three days after his marriage Lenny Cantrow falls in love with Kelly, a girl he meets on the beach. Undaunted by her parents' dislike of him, he announces his intention of getting a divorce and marrying her. Two weeks later, a bemused Kelly finds him in her home town, divorced and ready for stage two of his plan ...
Screenplay by NEIL SIMON based on the story A Change of Plan by BRUCE JAY FRIEDMAN
Producer EDGAR J. SCHERICK Directed by ELAINE MAY
(First showing on British television)
BBC Two England

A Letter to Three Wives

Continuing a season of films specially made for television.
Tonight starring Loni Anderson Michele Lee
- Joseph Mankiewicz 's
1949 double-Oscar winner has been updated to the 80s in this sizzling story that dissects three marriages and finds that each one is questionable. As three wives board a boat for a day-long charity cruise, they are handed a letter from a mutual friend saying that she is running off with one of their husbands. Each wife has every reason to believe that hers is the husband in question....
Screenplay by SALLY ROBINSON Produced by KAREN MOORE Directed by LARRY ELIKANN
(First showing on British television)
0 FILMS: page 26
* CEEFAX SUBTITLES
BBC Radio 3

Composer of the Week: Richard Rodgers

With Donald Macleod and Adrian Edwards.
4: Big Screen. Little Screen
Richard Rodgers was perhaps never happy writing for Hollywood, but many of his stage shows found a new I ife on the si Iver screen.
Music includes Judy Garland singing
Johnny One Note, Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald in Love Me Tonight, Doris Day and Jimmy Durante in Jumbo,
Frank Sinatra singing The Lady Is a Tramp, some of Rodgers's music from the television series Victory at Sea, and Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music.
BBC Radio 3

Composer of the Week: Rodgers

With Donald Macleod and Adrian Edwards. 4: Big Screen, Little Screen
Richard Rodgers was perhaps never entirely happywriting for Hollywood, but many of his stage shows found a new life on the silver screen. Music in today's programme includes Judy Garland singing JohnnyOne-note, Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald with Love Me
Tonight, Doris Day and Jimmy Durante with Jumbo, Frank Sinatra singing The Lady Is a Tramp, some of Rodgers's music from the television series Victory at Sea, and Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music.
National Programme Daventry

Variety

ELSIE and DORIS WATERS Entertainers
RUDY STARITA Vibraphone and Xylophone Solos
ARTHUR PRINCE and Jim
FREDERIQUE Soprano
THE WESTERN BROTHERS (Kenneth and George)
THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA
Under the direction of S. KNEALE KELLEY
TOPPING THE BILL tonight are Arthur Prince and Jim, who, between them, have been the most famous ventriloquial act in modern times. But there was an occasion when for two performances, the act had a third partner, as successful as he was uninvited.
Peter was a little Persian cat, and one morning took it into his head to follow Arthur Prince to the station. Prince, then, was living at Maidenhead and playing at the Palace Theatre, London. There being no time to take Peter back, he was taken to town.
It was a real day out for him. He lunched at Oddenino's, dined at the Eccentric Club between the shows, and at night repeated his matinee debut to the delight of the audience. For Jim the doll sat on Prince's lap, and Peter sat on Jim's, licking his face. He arrived back at Maidenhead on his master's shoulder at one in the morning, fast asleep, but purring.
Elsie and Doris Waters-' Gert and Daisy '—are a great draw on the halls, owing to their popularity on the air. If you ever see them, and want to know which is which, Doris is dark and Daisy, Elsie is fair and Gert. Elsie, by the way, is an accomplished violinist and a pupil of Albert Sandier.
The Western Brothers, after a success at the microphone, went into cabaret. They were booked for three days and stayed for three months. That's the sort of thing that happens to them. They write all their own songs.
' Frederique ' isn't her name, but she parted her hair in the middle, put on a suitable accent, and was promptly engaged. But then not many English girls can speak seven languages.
Rudy Starita is to broadcast a piece of music which he specially composed for the xylophone to see how many notes he can get to the minute. The average is 800.... A bill of infinite variety.
2LO London

CHURCH CANTATA (No.6) BACH

'BLEIB BEI UNS '
(Bide with us)
Belayed from the Guildhall School of Music
Doris, OWENS (Contralto)
Tom PICKERING (Tenor)
STANLEY RlLEY (Bass)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello Piccolo)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON
(Violoncello)
Continuo Edward CRUFT (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
THE most impressive part of this
Cantata is the opening chorus; it is always regarded as among the most noble and poetic of all the great Bach's conceptions. It. sets the words of the disciples, ' Abide with us,' with a wonderful sense of their affection, blended with their pleading. And in both the German and the English versions, an impressive effect is made by the way in which the accent falls first on the word bide,' next on. 'with' and the third time on 'us.'
Then where the text tells of evening drawing nigh, the voices sink down as though oppressed by the coming of night, and the music of the accompaniment suggests an anxious trembling.
There is a middle section where the time changes to four-in-the-bar, and the cry is still more insistent, and at the end the opening mood of pleading returns.
The final close is in major, with a wonderful effect of gladness as though the watchers suddenly knew that their prayer was heard.
The second number is a very beautiful alto aria with an obbligato for oboe da caccia, usually replaced now by the English Horn, and then there follows a Chorale for the treble voices with a full and expressive orchestral accompaniment. It has an obbligato for .the old violoncello piccolo, now usually replaced either by the violoncello, or shared between the violoncello and viola.
The tenor aria, number five, lying very high and difficult to sing, is instinct with tenderness. It is finely accompanied by the strings and continuo alone. In the final Chorale, dignified and simple, all the instruments, two oboes, oboe da caccia, strings and continuo. reinforce the voices.
L-Chorus:
Bide with us. for eve is drawing onward, and the day is now declining.
II.—Aria (Alto) :
Thon, whose praises never end.
Son of God. vouchsafe to hear us: While before Thy throne we bend, Let Thy favour still be near us. Grant, 0 grant us needful light, Thro' the coming hours of night.
III.— Chorale (Treble) :
0 bide with us, Thou Saviour dear, Forsake us not when eve is near.
Thy sacred word. clear guiding light, 0 grant it ne'er be quenched in night. In this our last and weakest hour
Inspire us. Lord. with steadfast pow'r. That undefil'd Thy faith we keep, Until in death secure we sleep.
IV.— Recitative (Bass) !
Behold, around us, on ev'ry side, to darkness still increasing. And if we ask whence comes this darkness. heuce It comes. 'Tis that, from the least to the greatest. scarce one in righteousness before his God is walking, and in the works the Saviour loves abounding; And thus instead of light there is but darkness.
Y.-Aria (Tenor) :
Lord, to us Thyself be showing
That no more we in ways of sin be going. May the light of Thy word on men be shining
All to trust in Thee inclining.
VI.— Chorale :
Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy pow'r display Thou, Lord, whom other lords obey. Thy servants with Thy grace de. end. That so their thanks may never end.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs.
Novello and Co., Ltd.
The Cantata for Sunday, July 21, is
No. 136 Erforsche mich Gott,
(' Thou knowest me God
2LO London

CHURCH CANTATA

(No. 6) BACH
'BLEIB BEI UNS'
(Bide with us)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
TOM PiGKERING (Tenor)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
THE WIRELESS CitORUS
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello Piccolo)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON
( Violoncello)
Continuo EUGENE CRUFT (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) "
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
The most impressive part of this
Cantata is the opening chorus; it is always regarded as among the most noble and p tie of all the great Bach's conceptions. It sets the words of the disciples, ' Abide with us,' with a wonderful sense of their affection, blended with their pleading. And in both the German and the English versions. an impressive effect is made by the way in which the accent falls first on the word ' bide,' next on • with ' and the third time on 'us.' Then where the text tells of evening drawing nigh, the voices sink down as though oppressed by the coming of night, and the music of the accompani ment suggests an anxious trembling. There is a middle section where the time changes to four-in-the-bar, and the cry is still more insistent, and at the end the opening mood of pleading returns. The final close is in major, with a wonderful effect of gladness as though the watchers suddenly knew that their prayer was heard
The second number is a very beautiful alto aria with an obbligato for oboe da caccia, usually replaced now by the English Horn, and then there follows a Chorale for the treble voices with a full and expressive orchestral accompaniment. It has an obbligato for the old violoncello piccolo, now usually replaced either by the cello, or shared between the 'cello and viola.
' .The tenor aria, number five, lying very high and difficult to sing, is instinct with tenderness. It is finely accompanied by the strings and continuo alone. In the final Chorale, dignified and simple. all the instruments, two oboes, oboe da caccia, strings and continuo, reinforce the voices.
I.—Chorus :
Bide with us, for eve is drawing onward. and the day is now declining.
II—Aria (Alto): .-
Thou, whose praises nerer end,
Son of God, vouchsafe to hear us : While before Thy throne we bend. Let Thy favour still be near us. Grant, 0 grant us needful light. Thro' the coming hours of night.
III.— Chorale (Treble):
0 bide with us. Thou Saviour dear, Forsake us not when eve is near.
Thy sacred word. clear guiding lisht, 0 grant it ne'er be quenched in night. In this our last and weakest hour.
Inspire us. Lord, with steadfast powr. That undeflTd Thy faith we keep, Until in death secure we sleep.
IV.—Recitatire (Bass) :
Behold, around us, on ev'ry Bide b darkness still increasing. And if we ask whence comes this darkness, hence It comes. 'Tis that, from the least to the greatest, scarce one in righteousness before his Cod ts walking, and in the works the Saviour loves abounding; And thus instead of light there is but darkness.
V.—Aria (Tenor) !
Lord, to us Thysell be showing
That no more we in ways of sin be going. May the light of Thy word on men be shining
All to trust in Thee inclining.
VI—Chorale :
Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy pow'r display; Thou, Lord, whom other lords obey,
Thy servants with Thy grace defend, That so their thanks may never end.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs.
NoveUo and Co., Ltd.
The Cantata for Sunday, July 7, is : —
No. 9.
' Es ist das Heil uns kommen her.'
(' Behold Salvation is at hand.')
5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA

(No. 6) BACH
'BLEIB BEI UNS'
(Bide with us)
Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
TOM PiGKERING (Tenor)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
THE WIRELESS CitORUS
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello Piccolo)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON
( Violoncello)
Continuo EUGENE CRUFT (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) "
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
The most impressive part of this
Cantata is the opening chorus; it is always regarded as among the most noble and p tie of all the great Bach's conceptions. It sets the words of the disciples, ' Abide with us,' with a wonderful sense of their affection, blended with their pleading. And in both the German and the English versions. an impressive effect is made by the way in which the accent falls first on the word ' bide,' next on • with ' and the third time on 'us.' Then where the text tells of evening drawing nigh, the voices sink down as though oppressed by the coming of night, and the music of the accompani ment suggests an anxious trembling. There is a middle section where the time changes to four-in-the-bar, and the cry is still more insistent, and at the end the opening mood of pleading returns. The final close is in major, with a wonderful effect of gladness as though the watchers suddenly knew that their prayer was heard
The second number is a very beautiful alto aria with an obbligato for oboe da caccia, usually replaced now by the English Horn, and then there follows a Chorale for the treble voices with a full and expressive orchestral accompaniment. It has an obbligato for the old violoncello piccolo, now usually replaced either by the cello, or shared between the 'cello and viola.
' .The tenor aria, number five, lying very high and difficult to sing, is instinct with tenderness. It is finely accompanied by the strings and continuo alone. In the final Chorale, dignified and simple. all the instruments, two oboes, oboe da caccia, strings and continuo, reinforce the voices.
I.—Chorus :
Bide with us, for eve is drawing onward. and the day is now declining.
II—Aria (Alto): .-
Thou, whose praises nerer end,
Son of God, vouchsafe to hear us : While before Thy throne we bend. Let Thy favour still be near us. Grant, 0 grant us needful light. Thro' the coming hours of night.
III.— Chorale (Treble):
0 bide with us. Thou Saviour dear, Forsake us not when eve is near.
Thy sacred word. clear guiding lisht, 0 grant it ne'er be quenched in night. In this our last and weakest hour.
Inspire us. Lord, with steadfast powr. That undeflTd Thy faith we keep, Until in death secure we sleep.
IV.—Recitatire (Bass) :
Behold, around us, on ev'ry Bide b darkness still increasing. And if we ask whence comes this darkness, hence It comes. 'Tis that, from the least to the greatest, scarce one in righteousness before his Cod ts walking, and in the works the Saviour loves abounding; And thus instead of light there is but darkness.
V.—Aria (Tenor) !
Lord, to us Thysell be showing
That no more we in ways of sin be going. May the light of Thy word on men be shining
All to trust in Thee inclining.
VI—Chorale :
Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy pow'r display; Thou, Lord, whom other lords obey,
Thy servants with Thy grace defend, That so their thanks may never end.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs.
NoveUo and Co., Ltd.
The Cantata for Sunday, July 7, is : —
No. 9.
' Es ist das Heil uns kommen her.'
(' Behold Salvation is at hand.')
5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.6) BACH

'BLEIB BEI UNS '
(Bide with us)
Belayed from the Guildhall School of Music
Doris, OWENS (Contralto)
Tom PICKERING (Tenor)
STANLEY RlLEY (Bass)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello Piccolo)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON
(Violoncello)
Continuo Edward CRUFT (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
THE most impressive part of this
Cantata is the opening chorus; it is always regarded as among the most noble and poetic of all the great Bach's conceptions. It. sets the words of the disciples, ' Abide with us,' with a wonderful sense of their affection, blended with their pleading. And in both the German and the English versions, an impressive effect is made by the way in which the accent falls first on the word bide,' next on. 'with' and the third time on 'us.'
Then where the text tells of evening drawing nigh, the voices sink down as though oppressed by the coming of night, and the music of the accompaniment suggests an anxious trembling.
There is a middle section where the time changes to four-in-the-bar, and the cry is still more insistent, and at the end the opening mood of pleading returns.
The final close is in major, with a wonderful effect of gladness as though the watchers suddenly knew that their prayer was heard.
The second number is a very beautiful alto aria with an obbligato for oboe da caccia, usually replaced now by the English Horn, and then there follows a Chorale for the treble voices with a full and expressive orchestral accompaniment. It has an obbligato for .the old violoncello piccolo, now usually replaced either by the violoncello, or shared between the violoncello and viola.
The tenor aria, number five, lying very high and difficult to sing, is instinct with tenderness. It is finely accompanied by the strings and continuo alone. In the final Chorale, dignified and simple, all the instruments, two oboes, oboe da caccia, strings and continuo. reinforce the voices.
L-Chorus:
Bide with us. for eve is drawing onward, and the day is now declining.
II.—Aria (Alto) :
Thon, whose praises never end.
Son of God. vouchsafe to hear us: While before Thy throne we bend, Let Thy favour still be near us. Grant, 0 grant us needful light, Thro' the coming hours of night.
III.— Chorale (Treble) :
0 bide with us, Thou Saviour dear, Forsake us not when eve is near.
Thy sacred word. clear guiding light, 0 grant it ne'er be quenched in night. In this our last and weakest hour
Inspire us. Lord. with steadfast pow'r. That undefil'd Thy faith we keep, Until in death secure we sleep.
IV.— Recitative (Bass) !
Behold, around us, on ev'ry side, to darkness still increasing. And if we ask whence comes this darkness. heuce It comes. 'Tis that, from the least to the greatest. scarce one in righteousness before his God is walking, and in the works the Saviour loves abounding; And thus instead of light there is but darkness.
Y.-Aria (Tenor) :
Lord, to us Thyself be showing
That no more we in ways of sin be going. May the light of Thy word on men be shining
All to trust in Thee inclining.
VI.— Chorale :
Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy pow'r display Thou, Lord, whom other lords obey. Thy servants with Thy grace de. end. That so their thanks may never end.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs.
Novello and Co., Ltd.
The Cantata for Sunday, July 21, is
No. 136 Erforsche mich Gott,
(' Thou knowest me God
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.6) BACH

'BLEIB BEI UNS '
(Bide with us)
Belayed from the Guildhall School of Music
Doris, OWENS (Contralto)
Tom PICKERING (Tenor)
STANLEY RlLEY (Bass)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT
(Violoncello Piccolo)
EDWARD J. ROBINSON
(Violoncello)
Continuo Edward CRUFT (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
THE most impressive part of this
Cantata is the opening chorus; it is always regarded as among the most noble and poetic of all the great Bach's conceptions. It. sets the words of the disciples, ' Abide with us,' with a wonderful sense of their affection, blended with their pleading. And in both the German and the English versions, an impressive effect is made by the way in which the accent falls first on the word bide,' next on. 'with' and the third time on 'us.'
Then where the text tells of evening drawing nigh, the voices sink down as though oppressed by the coming of night, and the music of the accompaniment suggests an anxious trembling.
There is a middle section where the time changes to four-in-the-bar, and the cry is still more insistent, and at the end the opening mood of pleading returns.
The final close is in major, with a wonderful effect of gladness as though the watchers suddenly knew that their prayer was heard.
The second number is a very beautiful alto aria with an obbligato for oboe da caccia, usually replaced now by the English Horn, and then there follows a Chorale for the treble voices with a full and expressive orchestral accompaniment. It has an obbligato for .the old violoncello piccolo, now usually replaced either by the violoncello, or shared between the violoncello and viola.
The tenor aria, number five, lying very high and difficult to sing, is instinct with tenderness. It is finely accompanied by the strings and continuo alone. In the final Chorale, dignified and simple, all the instruments, two oboes, oboe da caccia, strings and continuo. reinforce the voices.
L-Chorus:
Bide with us. for eve is drawing onward, and the day is now declining.
II.—Aria (Alto) :
Thon, whose praises never end.
Son of God. vouchsafe to hear us: While before Thy throne we bend, Let Thy favour still be near us. Grant, 0 grant us needful light, Thro' the coming hours of night.
III.— Chorale (Treble) :
0 bide with us, Thou Saviour dear, Forsake us not when eve is near.
Thy sacred word. clear guiding light, 0 grant it ne'er be quenched in night. In this our last and weakest hour
Inspire us. Lord. with steadfast pow'r. That undefil'd Thy faith we keep, Until in death secure we sleep.
IV.— Recitative (Bass) !
Behold, around us, on ev'ry side, to darkness still increasing. And if we ask whence comes this darkness. heuce It comes. 'Tis that, from the least to the greatest. scarce one in righteousness before his God is walking, and in the works the Saviour loves abounding; And thus instead of light there is but darkness.
Y.-Aria (Tenor) :
Lord, to us Thyself be showing
That no more we in ways of sin be going. May the light of Thy word on men be shining
All to trust in Thee inclining.
VI.— Chorale :
Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy pow'r display Thou, Lord, whom other lords obey. Thy servants with Thy grace de. end. That so their thanks may never end.
The text is reprinted by courtesy of Messrs.
Novello and Co., Ltd.
The Cantata for Sunday, July 21, is
No. 136 Erforsche mich Gott,
(' Thou knowest me God






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