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5XX Daventry

A Recital

GERTRUDE MELLER (Pianoforte)
THE appearance of Schumann's name beside Chopin's inevitably recalls the remark
'Hats off, gentlemen - a genius.' At another time Schumann spoke of Chopin as 'the boldest and proudest poetic spirit of our time.'
Enthusiasm was the mainspring of Schumann's nature, a warm-hearted generosity and outlook which is often part and parcel of the genuinely romantic temperament. Exactly what' romantic' means, as we apply it to the whole school of music on whose behalf Schumann was so tirelessly active, alike as musician and as scribe, is most easily learned by listening to his music itself. If anybody was ever entitled to call one of his own pieces a 'Romance,' it was Schumann.
THE two tributes of Schumann, quoted above, are by no means all that could be said in praise of Chopin. He was one of the world's really great pianists, and a composer for his instrument whose niche in the temple of Fame is peculiarly his own. A master of delicate and original rhythm and harmony, a real master also of style, he holds the affection of pianists and lovers of pianoforte music even more by the fascination of his melodies. Choosing in most of his shorter pieces the forms in which something of rhythm and type are definitely prescribed, he was thus apparently facing himself with the task of saying the same thing over and over again, and yet he never says the same thing twice. Not only did he invest every new Etude, Ballade, Mazurka, whatever it might be, with an interest and an importance such as they never had before, but each one has a message of its own for us, which can neither be repeated nor imitated. It was as though he possessed that magical power, given only to the elect, of transmuting everything he touched into a unique gem, of whose production no other holds the secret.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Recital

GERTRUDE MELLER (Pianoforte)
THE appearance of Schumann's name beside
Chopin's inevitably recalls the remark
Hats off, gentlemen-a genius.' At another time Schumann spoke of Chopin as ' the boldest and proudest poetic spirit of our time.'
Enthusiasm was the mainspring of Schumann's nature, a warm-hearted generosity and outlook which is often part and parcel of the genuinely romantic temperament. Exactly what' romantic' means, as we apply it to the whole school of music on whose behalf Schumann was so tirelessly active, alike as musician and as scribe, is most easily learned by listening to his music itself. If anybody was ever entitled to call one of his own pieces a ' Romance,' it was Schumann.
THE two tributes of Schumann, quoted above, are by no means all that could be said in praise of Chopin. He was one of the world's really great pianists, and a composer for his instrument whose niche in the temple of Fame is peculiarly his own. A master of delicate and original rhythm and hannonv. a real master also of style, he holds the affection of pianists and lovers of pianoforte musio even more by the fascination of his melodies. Choosing in most of his shorter pieces the forms in which something of rhythm and type are definitely prescribed, he was thus apparently facing himself with the task of saying the same thing over and over again, and yet he never says the same thing twice. Not only did he invest every new Etude, Ballade, Mazurka, whatever it might be, with an interest and an importance such as they never had before, but each one has a message of its own for us, which can neither be repeated nor imitated. It was as though he possessed that magical power, given only to the elect, of transmuting everything he touched into a unique gem, of whose production no other holds the secret.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RUSSELL OWEN (Tenor)
EFFIE KALISZ (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS Military BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE, though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early age of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 he appeared as solo violinst and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubim, Rossini, and other masters, singing too as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Pagagono, in the first performance of The Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838.
In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on public affection today. He came back to England and produced it at Drury Lane Theatre in November, 1843. Fifteen years later it was given in Italian at Her Majesty's with the name La Zingara , and in 1869 the Theatre Lyrique,
Paris, staged it in an enlarged form with several additional numbers by Balfe himself, calling it La Bohemienne.
THIS was the first Ballet which the Imperial
Opera of Moscow commissioned from
Tchaikovsky. He had just finished his Third Symphony, and composed this music in the quiet country house of a married sister, working so happily that the first two acts were finished in a fortnight.
The first performance was not a great success, inadequate performance being more to blame than the music itself. Its tuneful grace and charm soon won their way to popularity, and in the form of a Suite the music has ever since held a place of its own in the affections of Tchaikovsky's admirers.
In the Ballet, the Swan is a beautiful maiden who has been enchanted by a wicked magician and who is in the end rescued by her faithful Knight. There are six movements in the Suite, called respectively :-
(1) Scene; (2) Waltz; (3) Dance of the Swans; (4) Scene; (5) Hungarian Dance; (6) Scene
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RUSSELL OWEN (Tenor)
EFFIE KALISZ (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS Military BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE, though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early age of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 he appeared as solo violinst and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubim, Rossini, and other masters, singing too as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Pagagono, in the first performance of The Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838.
In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on public affection today. He came back to England and produced it at Drury Lane Theatre in November, 1843. Fifteen years later it was given in Italian at Her Majesty's with the name La Zingara , and in 1869 the Theatre Lyrique,
Paris, staged it in an enlarged form with several additional numbers by Balfe himself, calling it La Bohemienne.
THIS was the first Ballet which the Imperial
Opera of Moscow commissioned from
Tchaikovsky. He had just finished his Third Symphony, and composed this music in the quiet country house of a married sister, working so happily that the first two acts were finished in a fortnight.
The first performance was not a great success, inadequate performance being more to blame than the music itself. Its tuneful grace and charm soon won their way to popularity, and in the form of a Suite the music has ever since held a place of its own in the affections of Tchaikovsky's admirers.
In the Ballet, the Swan is a beautiful maiden who has been enchanted by a wicked magician and who is in the end rescued by her faithful Knight. There are six movements in the Suite, called respectively :-
(1) Scene; (2) Waltz; (3) Dance of the Swans; (4) Scene; (5) Hungarian Dance; (6) Scene
5XX Daventry

El Religious Service

From the Church of Our Lady- of Victories, Kensington
Order of Service :
Scripture Reading: Gospel of the 5th Sunday after Easter (John xvi, 23-30)
Hymn, Soul of my Saviour (Westminster Hymnal, No. 74) Address by the Rev. John P.
ABENDZEN, D.D., D.Ph., M.A.
(For 8.45-10-30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

El Religious Service

From the Church of Our Lady- of Victories, Kensington
Order of Service :
Scripture Reading: Gospel of the 5th Sunday after Easter (John xvi, 23-30)
Hymn, Soul of my Saviour (Westminster Hymnal, No. 74) Address by the Rev. John P.
ABENDZEN, D.D., D.Ph., M.A.
(For 8.45-10-30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

Doris VANE (Soprano)
JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL pHERUBINO, the page in the household of the Count and Countess, cannot make up his mind, poor lad, whether he is more in love with his mistress or with the maid Susanna. He finds it impossible to speak to either of them without blushing and sighing. He has un. guardedly confessed to Susanna that he has written, poetry in honour of his lady, and the two chaff him mercilessly. The Countess commands him to sing his ballad, while Susanna accompanies him on the guitar. That is the air which is to be sung now, one of the most wholly delightful of all Mozart's seductive melodies. The gist of the poem is a request to be told what nature of thing love is, so that the singer may know whether that really is the malady from which he suffers.
IT has always been a temptation to composers to make new settings for traditional folk songs. It is a risky adventure; even when a folk song is not of itself a really good tune, it very often has so firm a hold on the popular affections that it is not easy to displace it. Indeed, sad to relate, it is often the worst tunes which are the best loved. Here are two examples by present-day composers, of old songs furnished with new music, and listeners must decide for themselves whether or not they think the modem tunes such as to oust the older ones from the positions they have held so long.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

Doris VANE (Soprano)
JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL pHERUBINO, the page in the household of the Count and Countess, cannot make up his mind, poor lad, whether he is more in love with his mistress or with the maid Susanna. He finds it impossible to speak to either of them without blushing and sighing. He has un. guardedly confessed to Susanna that he has written, poetry in honour of his lady, and the two chaff him mercilessly. The Countess commands him to sing his ballad, while Susanna accompanies him on the guitar. That is the air which is to be sung now, one of the most wholly delightful of all Mozart's seductive melodies. The gist of the poem is a request to be told what nature of thing love is, so that the singer may know whether that really is the malady from which he suffers.
IT has always been a temptation to composers to make new settings for traditional folk songs. It is a risky adventure; even when a folk song is not of itself a really good tune, it very often has so firm a hold on the popular affections that it is not easy to displace it. Indeed, sad to relate, it is often the worst tunes which are the best loved. Here are two examples by present-day composers, of old songs furnished with new music, and listeners must decide for themselves whether or not they think the modem tunes such as to oust the older ones from the positions they have held so long.
5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto)
WALTER GLYNNE (Tenor)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words
THESE pieces of Mendelssohn's, written originally for pianoforte solo, are so aptly described by the name which he gave them that it is difficult to understand why the original English edition fought shy of the title. On their first appearance in this country they were called Instrumental Lieder for Klavier, or Songs for the Pianoforte Alone. In 1832 the first set appeared in London as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, and only some years later did the original German title, and eventually the English translation of it which is now so universally known, make their appearance. Another astonishing thing about them, in view of the way in which they have since made themselves at home throughout this country, is that very few copies were sold in the first years after their publication here.
Mendelssohn himself regarded them as rather trifling works, and on one occasion spoke of them as ' Animalculse ' ; none the less, they do embody many of his freshest melodic ideas, and are clearly destined to keep the strong hold which they have on the affections, not only of pianists, but of those who like them in the many arrangements which have been made of them. 4.8 QUINTET Selection of Chopin's Preludes (For 4.55—5.30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A CONCERT

LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto)
WALTER GLYNNE (Tenor)
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET
Selection, Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words
THESE pieces of Mendelssohn's, written originally for pianoforte solo, are so aptly described by the name which he gave them that it is difficult to understand why the original English edition fought shy of the title. On their first appearance in this country they were called Instrumental Lieder for Klavier, or Songs for the Pianoforte Alone. In 1832 the first set appeared in London as Original Melodies for the Pianoforte, and only some years later did the original German title, and eventually the English translation of it which is now so universally known, make their appearance. Another astonishing thing about them, in view of the way in which they have since made themselves at home throughout this country, is that very few copies were sold in the first years after their publication here.
Mendelssohn himself regarded them as rather trifling works, and on one occasion spoke of them as ' Animalculse ' ; none the less, they do embody many of his freshest melodic ideas, and are clearly destined to keep the strong hold which they have on the affections, not only of pianists, but of those who like them in the many arrangements which have been made of them. 4.8 QUINTET Selection of Chopin's Preludes (For 4.55—5.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
'O Ewiges Feuer, O Ursprung der Liebe'
(O Light Everlasting, O Love never failing)
Doris Owens (Contralto)
Tom Purvis (Tenor)
Stanley Riley (Bass)
Leslie Woodgate (Organ)
The Wireless Chorus and The Wireless Orchestra
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by Stanford Robinson
We know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first 'great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes. 3 trumpets and drums/ are all called on, besides the usual strings and continue.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co., I.M.
I.—Chorus: O Light everlasting, O Love never failing. Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest, Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, In our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With as Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell; O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy,
Whom God His dwelling deigns to make. He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take. Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace : His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling : how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus:
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us, Thank Him who on us hath thought. Yea, His love this grace hath brought. Peace and rest our Saviour sends us, Peace be unto Israel.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
'O EWIGES FEUER , O URSPRUNG DER LIEBE'
(O Light Everlasting, O Love never failing)
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
Tom PURVIS (Tenor)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title.
The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be horn from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But It is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire rather than Light., and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first ' great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another - big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it. to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes. 3 trumpets and drums/ are all called on, besides the usual strings and continue.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co., I.M.
I.-Chorus:
O Light everlasting, O Love never failing. Our darkness illumine and draw us to
Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest, Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.-Recitative (Tenor):
Lord, In our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With as Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell; 0 knit our hearts to Thee : Lord, ever near us be ! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.-Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy,
Whom God His dwelling deigns to make. He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take. Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.-Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace : His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling : how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.-Chorus:
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us, Thank Him who on us hath thought. Yea, His love this grace hath brought. Peace and rest our Saviour sends us, Peace be unto Israel.
5XX Daventry

A Brass Band Concert

S.B. from Newcastle
Artists from the London Studio
GARDA HALL (Soprano)
WATCYN WATCYNS (Baritone) The MARSDEN COI.LIERY BAND
Conducted by JACK BODDICE
THE Brass Band came into being originally as a mounted band, most of the instruments being easier to manipulate in one hand, while the player holds the bridle rein with the other, than the woodwinds would have been. The French call it a 'Fanfare,' applying the same term to a cavalry band on mounted duty. It has naturally not the same fullness and variety as the complete Military Band, but can produce very rich, sonorous tone with gradations of quality and strength which are remarkable when one knows its limitations. In this country, almost more than anywhere else, brass bands have long been popular apart from any military use, and many societies and industrial concerns have their own brass bands, which often reach a very high pitch of excellence. Our British brass band contests are unique in their own way.
VON SUPPE, best known to us by such evergreen favourites as the Overtures Poet and Peasant and Light Cavalry, wrote for the light opera stage with such tireless industry that, according to one authority, he left the amazing number of 165 light operas and smaller works, as well as at least two grand operas. Boccaccio was one of the comparatively few which were heard in London. It was given here at the Comedy Theatre in 1882, and was warmly welcomed. The music is full of that charm and brightness which we associate with the Viennese stage, and though only the Overture is now played, it, at least, bids fair to keep its place as a favourite concert piece.
It is interesting to note that Suppe anticipated
Lilac Time by a little opera which he called Franz Schubert , and in which some of Schubert's own melodies were incorporated.
DELIBES' most successful Grand Opera was broadcast at the end of February, so that listeners had an opportunity of deciding for themselves whether or not he was as successful in that serious vein as he is with Ballets and similar light music. In his own day there was no doubt at all about the popularity of his Ballets and of some of his lighter stage pieces, but like many men who have won success in that way, he was anxious to achieve a similar position on the serious opera stage, an ambition which he only partially realized. Suites or Selections from the music of three of his Ballets are frequently played—Sylvia, Coppelia, and La Source (The Fountain)—and it would be difficult to say which of the three is the most popular. All are tuneful and melodious with that lightness of touch and airy grace which we call French, and all lend themselves well to arrangement for military band and in other ways.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Brass Band Concert

S.B. from Newcastle
Artists from the London Studio
GARDA HALL (Soprano)
WATCYN WATCYNS (Baritone) The MARSDEN COI.LIERY BAND
Conducted by JACK BODDICE
THE Brass Band came into being originally as a mounted band, most of the instruments being easier to manipulate in one hand, while the player holds the bridle rein with the other, than the woodwinds would have been. The French call it a 'Fanfare,' applying the same term to a cavalry band on mounted duty. It has naturally not the same fullness and variety as the complete Military Band, but can produce very rich, sonorous tone with gradations of quality and strength which are remarkable when one knows its limitations. In this country, almost more than anywhere else, brass bands have long been popular apart from any military use, and many societies and industrial concerns have their own brass bands, which often reach a very high pitch of excellence. Our British brass band contests are unique in their own way.
VON SUPPE, best known to us by such evergreen favourites as the Overtures Poet and Peasant and Light Cavalry, wrote for the light opera stage with such tireless industry that, according to one authority, he left the amazing number of 165 light operas and smaller works, as well as at least two grand operas. Boccaccio was one of the comparatively few which were heard in London. It was given here at the Comedy Theatre in 1882, and was warmly welcomed. The music is full of that charm and brightness which we associate with the Viennese stage, and though only the Overture is now played, it, at least, bids fair to keep its place as a favourite concert piece.
It is interesting to note that Suppe anticipated
Lilac Time by a little opera which he called Franz Schubert , and in which some of Schubert's own melodies were incorporated.
DELIBES' most successful Grand Opera was broadcast at the end of February, so that listeners had an opportunity of deciding for themselves whether or not he was as successful in that serious vein as he is with Ballets and similar light music. In his own day there was no doubt at all about the popularity of his Ballets and of some of his lighter stage pieces, but like many men who have won success in that way, he was anxious to achieve a similar position on the serious opera stage, an ambition which he only partially realized. Suites or Selections from the music of three of his Ballets are frequently played—Sylvia, Coppelia, and La Source (The Fountain)—and it would be difficult to say which of the three is the most popular. All are tuneful and melodious with that lightness of touch and airy grace which we call French, and all lend themselves well to arrangement for military band and in other ways.
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

GERTRUDE JOHNSON (Soprano)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE SICILIAN VESPERS made its first appearance, in French, at the Paris Opera in 1855, two years after II Trovatore and La Traviata had appeared at Rome and Venice respectively. The libretto, by Scribe, deals with the massacre of the French invaders in Sicily while they were at vespers on Easter Monday, 1282. The tale is a thrilling one, if somewhat sanguinary, and the opera is full of Verdi's inimitable charm, so that it is a little difficult to understand why it has fallen into such neglect. The Overture, however, still holds a warm place in the affections of music lovers, and must be too well known to need very much in the way of description.
It begins with a slow introduction in which a menacing figure on drums and strings forms the accompaniment to a sad tune for woodwinds. The main part of the Overture, in Allegro agitato, begins with astrenuous figure suggestingstrifeand warfare ; this is succeeded, after a silent pause, by a violoncello solo, one of the Verdi melodies which an audience goes away humming to itself. It leads to a march tune beginning very softly and gaining in strength and vigour until we have again a stormy episode. The violoncello melody is repeated, this time with the assistance of clarinets, and with a fuller accompaniment than before being transferred a little later to the violins ,and a strenuous prestissimo brings the Overture to its close.
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA, as all have had opportunities of discovering for themselves, is very different from opera of the conventional order; it is peculiarly English in form. The tale is by Gay, and the music consists almost entirely of songs and ballads of that date (the first quarter of the eighteenth century), all of them of that popular order, which means that people hum and sing and whistle them as they go about. They were chosen because of their popularity, and fitted into the scheme of the opera by Dr. Christopher Pepusch , whose only original contribution to the work was the Overture. In the whole work there are some seventy such popular tunes of the day, some of which are still well enough known to be recognized even by those who have not heard the opera. It had a successful run when it was first performed at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre in 1728 ; in a French version it was given in Paris in 1750.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

GERTRUDE JOHNSON (Soprano)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
THE SICILIAN VESPERS made its first appearance, in French, at the Paris Opera in 1855, two years after II Trovatore and La Traviata had appeared at Rome and Venice respectively. The libretto, by Scribe, deals with the massacre of the French invaders in Sicily while they were at vespers on Easter Monday, 1282. The tale is a thrilling one, if somewhat sanguinary, and the opera is full of Verdi's inimitable charm, so that it is a little difficult to understand why it has fallen into such neglect. The Overture, however, still holds a warm place in the affections of music lovers, and must be too well known to need very much in the way of description.
It begins with a slow introduction in which a menacing figure on drums and strings forms the accompaniment to a sad tune for woodwinds. The main part of the Overture, in Allegro agitato, begins with astrenuous figure suggestingstrifeand warfare ; this is succeeded, after a silent pau-e, by a violoncello solo, one of the Verdi melodies which an audience goes away humming to itself. It leads to a march tune beginning very softly and gaining in strength and vigour until we have again a stormy episode. The violoncello melody is repeated, this time with the assistance of clarinets, and with a fuller accompaniment than before being transferred a little later to the violins ,and a strenuous prestissimo brings the Overture to its close.
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA, as all have had opportunities of discovering for themselves, is very different from opera of the conventional order; it is peculiarly English in form. The tale is by Gay, and the music consists almost entirely of songs and ballads of that date (the first quarter of the eighteenth century), all of them of that popular order, which means that people hum and sing and whistle them as they go about. They were chosen because of their popularity, and fitted into the scheme of the opera by Dr. Christopher Pepusch , whose only original contribution to the work was the Overture. In the whole work there are some seventy such popular tunes of the day, some of which are still well enough known to be recognized even by those who have not heard the opera. It had a successful run when it was first performed at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre in 1728 ; in a French version it was given in Paris in 1750.
5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
' O EWIGES FEUER , 0
URSPRUNG DER LlEBE '
(0 Light Everlasting, 0 Love never failing) ,
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
TOM Purvis (Tenor.)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire, rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra, has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 3 trumpets and drums are all called on, besides the usual strings and continuo.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co... Ltd.
I.—Chorus.
0 Light everlasting, 0 Love never failing,
Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest,
Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, in our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With us Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell,
O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy, Whom God His dwelling deigns to make.
He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take.
Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace; His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling ; how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus :
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us,
Thank Him who on us hath thought.
Yea, His love this grace hath brought.
Peace and rest our Saviour sends us,
Peace be unto Israel.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Church Cantata (No. 34), Bach

Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music
' O EWIGES FEUER , 0
URSPRUNG DER LlEBE '
(0 Light Everlasting, 0 Love never failing) ,
Doris OWENS (Contralto)
TOM Purvis (Tenor.)
STANLEY RILEY (Bass)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, Flutes, Oboes and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
WE know from a set of older parts in existence, that this Cantata must be founded on another with the same title. The music, besides, for the alto aria hardly seems to be born from its present text in the way that Bach leads us to expect. But it is a splendidly impressive work, and the opening chorus, in aria form, is on a very big scale. The German text means Eternal Fire, rather than Light, and the vivid leaping figures in the orchestral Introduction and the accompaniment to the first great chorus suggest the tongues of flame that are to set the worshippers' hearts on fire. The whole of the first chorus is worked out with lavish adornment and was clearly one on which Bach worked with enthusiasm.
There are two short recitatives, one for Tenor and one for Bass, and between them is a beautiful aria for Alto in which the music, both for the voice and the orchestra, has a wonderful sense of peace and soothing. Instead of the usual simple chorale, there is another big imposing chorus, fully accompanied, and with an orchestral Interlude in the middle of it, to close the Cantata. Big though it is, Schweitzer assumes that this last chorus has been cut down from a fuller original form.
The orchestra used is a larger one than in many of the Cantatas: 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 3 trumpets and drums are all called on, besides the usual strings and continuo.
The text is reprinted from the Novello edition by permission of Messrs. Novello and Co... Ltd.
I.—Chorus.
0 Light everlasting, 0 Love never failing,
Our darkness illumine and draw us to Thee.
May we from Thy spirit receive inspiration
And grant us, most Highest,
Thy temple to be.
In Thee may our souls find their peace and salvation.
II.—Recitative (Tenor) :
Lord, in our inmost hearts we hold Thy word the truth to be.
With us Thou dost vouchsafe to dwell,
O knit our hearts to Thee: Lord, ever near us be! If Thou within us but abide, we need not aught beside.
III.—Aria (Alto):
Rejoice, ye souls, elect and holy, Whom God His dwelling deigns to make.
He doth His great salvation send us,
And all from God's own hand we take.
Unnumbered mercies still attend us.
IV.—Recitative (Bass):
The Lord doth choose a holy dwelling, whereon to shed His peace; His boundless grace our lips would fail in telling ; how He to bless His chosen doth not cease. It is our Father's everlasting will to bless His children still.
V.—Chorus :
Peace be unto Israel.
Thank the Lord whose love attends us,
Thank Him who on us hath thought.
Yea, His love this grace hath brought.
Peace and rest our Saviour sends us,
Peace be unto Israel.
5XX Daventry

Love in a Village

An Eighteenth Century Comic Opera in Three Acts
The Words by BICKERSTAFF
The Music by Arne, Handel, Geminiani, Carey Abel, etc
The whole adapted and arranged for broadcasting by JULIAN HERBAGE
Characters in the order you will hear them:
Country people, servants, etc.
THE WIRELESS CHORUS (Chorus Master, Stanford Robinson)
Produced by HOWARD ROSE The Music under the Direction of JULIAN HERBAGE
LOVE IN A VILLAGE originally appeared as a Comic Opera in three Acts, at Covent Garden Theatre in 1762. The music was partly composed by the great Dr. Arne and partly compiled by him from music which was then in vogue, and the piece enjoyed a real success.
At that time rivalry between Covent Garden and Drury Lane was very keen; contemporary records show that Arne's Opera was so popular that only on the nights when Garrick himself appeared at Drury Lane, was there any audience there. No other attraction could prevail against the charm and humour of this light-hearted work.
When Sir Nigel Playfair revived the Opera and produced it at the Lyric, Hammersmith, in 1928, the munie was recast, and additional numbers composed, by Mr. Alfred Reynolds, the Musical Director there, a musician to whom many of the Lyric's productions owed a good deal of their popularity. To a thorough knowledge of the theatre and stage-craft, Mr. Reynolds unites a happy knack of genuine, natural, melody and a thorough craftsmanship in music. A good deal of his work is already familiar to listeners, and he has an assured place of his own among composers of the present day, as well as a strong hold on the affections of all who appreciate fresh and wholesome art with nothing sombre nor troublesome in its make-up.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

'Love in a Village'

An Eighteenth Century Comic Opera in Throe' Acts
The Words by BICKERSTAFF
The Music by Arne, Handel, Geminiani,
Carey Abel , etc
The whole adapted and arranged for broadcasting by JULIAN HERBAGE
Characters in the order you will hear them :
Country people, servants, etc.
THE WIRELESS CHORUS (Chorus Master, Stanford
Robinson)
Produced by HOWARD ROSE The Music under the Direction of JULIAN HERBAGE
LOVE IN A VILLAGE originally appeared as a Comic Opera in three Acts, at Covent Garden Theatre in 1762. The music was partly composed by the great Dr. Ame and partly compiled by him from music which was then in vogue, and the piece enjoyed a real success.
At that time rivalry between Covent Garden and Drury Lane was very keen ; contemporary records show that Arne's Opera was so popular that only on the nights when Garrick himself
. appeared at Drury Lane, was there anv audience there. No other attraction could prevail against the charm and humour of this light-hearted work.
When Sir Nigel Playfair revived the Opera and produced it at the Lyric, Hammersmith, in 1928, the munie was recast, and additional numbers composed, by Mr. Alfred Reynolds, the Musical Director there, a musician to whom many of the Lyric's productions owed a good deal of their popularity. To a thorough knowledge of the theatre and stage-craft, Mr. Reynolds unites a happy knack of genuine, natural, melody and a thorough craftsmanship in music. A good deal of his work is already familiar to listeners, and he has an assured place of his own among composers of the present day, as well as a strong hold on the affections of all who appreciate fresh and wholesome art with nothing sombre nor troublesome in its make-up.






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