Programme Index

Discover 10,100,220 listings and 231,493 playable programmes from the BBC

Results 1 to 20 of 281 for trooping the colour
Filter by channel

Relayed from THE HORSE GUARDS PARADE
The Trooping of the King's Colour is the most impressive display of military ceremonial that London sees during the year. The Ordinary Trooping of the Colour, that takes place every morning on the Horse Guards Parade is itself an imposing spectacle, and today's performance is carried out on a far grander scale by guards drawn from the whole Brigade of Guards.
The B.B.C.'s commentators will be in an ideal position, over the Horse Guards arch leading from Whitehall to the Parade. Directly below them will be the King himself, and the whole of the ceremony takes place under their eyes. The sharp words of command shouted across the square, the clang of rifle-butts and jingling of harness, and the music of the massed hands will all, it is hoped, come into the microphone, as well as the running commentary itself.

London and Other Stations

9.25 The Southern Command Searchlight Tattoo
By kind permission of Gen. Sir Alexander J. Godley, G.O.C. in C. Southern Command
Music and effects with a Descriptive Commentary by Capt. H.B.T. Wakelam, R.A. (R. of O.)
Relayed from the Grounds of Tidworth House, Tidworth, Hants
The Broadcast will begin with introductory remarks by Capt. Wakelam

9.30 The 'First Post by Massed Trumpeters of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade
9.32 Entry of the Massed Bands of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade (Three Bands)
Entry of Massed Bands of the 7th Infantry Brigade (Three Bands)
Combined Advance of all, Massed (Six Bands)
9.50 Trooping of the Colour by the 2nd Cheshire Regiment
10.5 Physical Training Display by Army Gymnastic Staff Music by Massed Bands of the 7th Infantry Brigade
10.15 Entry of Massed Pipe and Drum Bands of Scottish Regiments
10.25 Interlude (See London Programme)

TROOPING THE COLOUR
With a description by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
Relayed from THE HORSEGUARDS, WHITEHALL
Tho Ceremony will open with the arrival of the Royal Procession, when the Royal Salute will be given.
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops, after which, the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards will play a slow march, countermarch, halt and play a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers
Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The-escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the hands and drums playing ' God Save the King.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Saluto.
The Household Cavalry march off. H.M. THE KING places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march of to Buckingham Palace, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes.

Contributors

Unknown:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May

TROOPING THE COLOUR
ON THE HORSE GUARDS' PARADE
Including a Commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY . Relayed from The Horse
Guards, Whitehall
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession and the Royal
Salute
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops
After which, the massed bands and drums of THE BRIGADE OF GUARDS play a slow march, countermarch, halt and play a quick march
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call
And the escort marches up to the COLOUR, the BANDS and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the COLOUR and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the COLOUR by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing
'GOD SAVE THE KING'
COLOUR and escort marches down the line of Guards and the whole Parade marches past His MAJESTY in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute
THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY march off
His MAJESTY places himself at the head of the KING'S GUARD, and the GUARDS march off to BUCKINGHAM PALACE, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes

Contributors

Commentary By:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May

Including a commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the ROYAL PROCESSION and the ROYAL SALUTE
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the BRIGADE OF GUARDS play a slow march, countermarch, halt, and play a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the 'British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing 'GOD SAVE THE KING.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the ROYAL SALUTE
THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY marches off. H.M. THE KING places himself at the head of the KING'S GUARD and the GUARDS march off to BUCKINGHAM PALACE, headed by the MASSED BANDS, DRUMS and Pipes
Relayed from the HORSE GUARDS, WHITEHALL

Contributors

Commentary By:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May

Celebration in London of the Birthday of HIS MAJESTY THE KING with a commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
(late Coldstream Guards)
Relayed from The HORSE GUARDS, WHITEHALL
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession, and the Royal Salute
H.M. The King inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards play a slow march, counter-march, halt, and play a quick march.
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the band and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers.' The Sergeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, and bands and drums play - 'God Save the King.'
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute.
The Household Cavalry marches off. THE KING places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march off to Buckingham Palace headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes

Contributors

Commentary By:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May

on the Horse Guards Parade, including a Commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY (late Coldstream
Guards)
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession and the Royal
Salute
H.M. The King inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards play a slow march, countermarch, halt, and play a quick march
A Drummer beats the Drummers' Call, .and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the British Grenadiers. The Serjeant-Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing God Save The King. Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. The King in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute
The Household Cavalry marches off. H.M. The King places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march off to Buckingham Palace, headed by the Massed Bands, Drums and Pipes
Relayed from the Horse Guards,
Whitehall
THE FOOT GUARDS who perform the ceremony of ' Trooping the Colour ' consist of five regiments as famous for their gallantry in war as for their discipline and drill.
The Grenadier Guards represent a regiment which served with the exited princes in the Spanish Army, returned at the Restoration in 1660, and received their title in 1815 for their services at Waterloo ; the Coldstream, their title recognised in 1670, were part of the army with which General Monk restored the monarchy, and were called Cold-streamers because they crossed the Tweed into England at the village of Coldstream ; the Scots Guards were raised and maintained in Scotland after the Restoration, marched to London in 1686 and 1688, and were brought on to the English establishment in 1707 ; the Irish Guards were formed in 1902, after the South African War; the Welsh Guards in 1915, in the Great War.
Though all five regiments wear scarlet and black bearskins, there are certain differences to distinguish them, such as the number of buttons worn on the jackets. But there is one easy way to tell at a distance which regiment is which. The Grenadiers wear a small white plume in their bearskins ; - the Coldstream a red plume; the Scots Guards no plume at all ; the Irish
Guards a blue-green one; and the Welsh Guards a green and white one.

Contributors

Unknown:
J. B. S. Bourne-May

'Verse, Story, and Song'
A contribution to the Jubilee
Celebrations
The feature of this Children's Jubilee Hour is that all of you are to be privileged to hear a talk on the King's boyhood by Major J. T. Gorman , who has written talks for you before on the King's horses, and the King's Household, and Trooping the Colour. You will also remember him as the author of that stirring play Jingling Johnnie.
Probably most of you know that His
Majesty was a sailor before he came to the throne, and you will hear something of his life on the training ship Britannia before he made a three years' tour of the world on the Bacchante.
Today's Children's Hour will open with a prologue and military marches. You will hear poems celebrating the glory of Britain, and a new song, ' The Silver Year ', written by Eleanor Farjeon and composed by Harry Farjeon.

Contributors

Unknown:
Major J. T. Gorman
Written By:
Eleanor Farjeon
Composed By:
Harry Farjeon.

Trooping the Colour on the Horse Guards Parade including a commentary by Major
J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY (Late Coldstream Guards)
The Ceremony opens with the arrival of the Royal Procession and The Royal Salute.
H.M. THE KING inspects the troops, after which the massed bands and drums of the Brigade of Guards play a slow march, countermarch, halt, and play a quick march
A Drummer beats, the Drummers' Call, and the escort marches up to the Colour, the bands and drums playing the ' British Grenadiers'. The Sergeant Major receives the Colour and hands it to the Ensign for the Colour. The escort salutes the Colour by presenting arms, the bands and drums playing 'God Save the King'.
Colour and escort march down the line of Guards, and the whole Parade marches past H.M. THE KING in slow time, and again in quick time, and finally forms up in line and gives the Royal Salute.
The Household Cavalry marches off. H.M. The KING places himself at the head of the King's Guard and the Guards march off to Buckingham Palace headed by the Massed Bands, Drums, and Pipes.
Relayed from The Horse Guards, Whitehall
See the article by Major Bourne-May on page 3

Contributors

Commentator:
J. B. S. Bourne-May

Trooping the Colour on the Horse Guards Parade, including a commentary by Major J. B. S. BOURNE-MAY
(Late Coldstream Guards) from the Horse Guards, Whitehall
Today is to be broadcast the first Trooping of the Colour in the reign of King Edward VIII in celebration of the birthday of his Majesty; and once again the commentary will be given by Major Bourne-May, an old Coldstreamer, who himself took part five times in the Trooping.
Troops will line the Mall and guard the Parade Ground-Horse Guards Parade, once the tilt-yard of Whitehall Palace. The eight guards for the day will arrive, the Colour be uncased and posted. The music will be heard as the procession approaches.
His Majesty will be received with a Royal Salute. He will then inspect the troops, accompanied by the Field-Officer-in-Brigade-Waiting. The Escort for the Colour will move out - the Colour found this year by the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards. The Colour will be trooped down the line of the Guards. Troops will march past His Majesty in slow and then in quick time, the band of each regiment playing its march as it goes by. The microphone on the roof of the Horse Guards will bring the whole pageant to listeners, who will hear the music gradually fade away as the cavalcade moves down the Mall towards Buckingham Palace.

Contributors

Commentary:
Major J.B.S. Bourne-May

to the 1st and 3rd Bns. Grenadier Guards, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Bns. Coldstream Guards and 2nd Bn. Scots Guards.
A description of the Ceremony by Major J.B.S. Bourne-May (Late Coldstream Guards).
Broadcast from Hyde Park.

This morning listeners will be able to visualise a ceremonial parade as splendid as Trooping the Colour which was broadcast the other week. Every fifteen years new Colours are presented to certain battalions of the Brigade of Guards by his Majesty the King. The parade, under the command of the Major-General commanding Brigade of Guards, will form up in Hyde Park, and the band of each regiment and the drums of each battalion will be on parade.

Queen Mary and the ladies of the Royal party will arrive by motor-car and set down at the Royal Dais. The King, accompanied by the Duke of York and attended by the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting, two equerries, and an escort of Household Cavalry, will reach the saluting base at 11 a.m. His Majesty will be received with the Royal Salute. The Band will play while His Majesty inspects the line.

And so the ceremony will proceed: the consecration and presentation of the Colours, the march past, and the playing of the National Anthem in full by the Band.

The thousands watching, the millions listening, will remember that twenty years ago His Majesty, then Prince of Wales, served in France with the Brigade to whom this morning he is presenting Colours.

Contributors

Commentary:
Major J.B.S. Bourne-May

The Rev. D. 0. SOPER, Ph.D.
This is the first of five talks by Donald Soper , famous for his Wednesday meetings on Tower Hill. On a May morning nine years ago he got up on the wall and clapped his hands and drew critics of Christianity round him, and he has been doing it ever since. Every Wednesday at one o'clock he is to be seen there, in sunshine or rain, in wind or hail or snow, answering the questions that are flung at him.
In this new series he is to deal with people first and problems second ; to put the case for organised Christianity to those men and women who at present find it impossible to accept it; to state as fairly as he can the point of view of some typical critics whom listeners have all met.
The critic who is concerned about himself and his destiny, and is ' incurably religious ' ; the critic who has no use for organised Christianity and all the ' mumbo-jumbo ' of ritual, though he accepts pageantry in trooping the colour, and even at his own wedding; the critic who says : ' It doesn't matter what you believe, it's the way you live that matters ' ; the critic who complains of a lack of charity in various Christian communities and says it is worse than their doctrinal differences ... each will be dealt with and answered. And in his fifth talk Dr. Soper will reply to listeners' questions.

Contributors

Unknown:
Donald Soper

in honour of the birthday of His Majesty the King with a description by Major J. B. S. Bourne-May (late Coldstream Guards) from the Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall

This morning is to be broadcast one of the most picturesque ceremonies in London, in celebration of the birthday of His Majesty the King. Broadcast in 1927, and every year since, it has proved one of the most popular outside broadcasts, and has very largely owed its success to the commentator, Major Bourne-May.
He has given the commentary every time, and himself took part five times in the Trooping. On the last occasion, in 1923, he commanded the Escort to the Colour found by the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards.
Troops will line the Mall and guard the Parade Ground-Horse Guards Parade, once the tilt-yard of Whitehall Palace. And thousands will see, and millions will visualise, the arrival of the eight guards for the day, the Colour uncased and posted between sentries near the centre of the ground. They will hear the music as the procession approaches.
His Majesty will be received with a Royal Salute. He will then inspect the troops, accompanied by the Field-Officer-in-Brigade-Waiting. The Escort for the Colour will move out -the Colour found this year by the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards. Finally they will hear the music fade away as the cavalcade moves down the Mall towards Buckingham Palace.

Contributors

Commentator:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May

in honour of the birthday of His Majesty the King with a description by Major J. B. S. Bourne-May (late
Coldstream Guards) from the Horse Guards Parade,
Whitehall
Trooping the Colour in celebration of the King's birthday is one of London's most picturesque annual ceremonies. Broadcast in 1927 and every year since, it has proved one of the most popular outside broadcasts-thanks very largely to the skill of Major Bourne-May, who has given the commentary every year.
Major Bourne-May has himself taken part in the Trooping five times. On the last occasion, in 1923, he commanded the Escort to the Colour found by the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, who are finding the Colour again this year.

Contributors

Unknown:
Major J. B. S. Bourne-May