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2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHAMBER MUSIC

FLORENCE HOLDING (Soprano), REX PALMER (Baritone), RAYA GARBOUSOVA ('Cello),
RAE ROBERTSON (Pianoforte) Allegro ma non tanto (Not too quick) ; Scherzo :
Allegro molto (Very quick) ; Adagio cantabile (Slow, in a singing style); Allegro vivace (Quick and lively)
QCHUMANN'S song is among that wonderful outpouring; of songs that came in the first few months of his happy marriage. The theme is the beloved one, steadfast of heart and lofty of mind. THE VAIN SERENADE is tliat of a lover who, outside his lady's house, begs her to admit him, but is rebuffed. ' Please go home to bed ! ' is all he gets after standing, nearly frozen, in the icy wind.
IN September, 1827, Schubert was taken by his friend Jenger on a three weeks' visit to Oratz, where he stayed as the guest of Dr. Pachler, a barrister whose wife was an excellent musician, well known to Beethoven. The time was spent in picnics, excursions, and a round of amusements. Schubert's famous setting of Who is Sylvia ? (the mock-serenade from Two Gentlemen of Verona) was composed during this visit and dedicated to the hostess. Allegro con brio (Quick, fiery) ; Introduction leading to Adagio molto (Very slow); Hondo, Allegretto moderato (Moderately quick)
4.30 RAYA GARBOUSOVA
Selected Items
5XX Daventry

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY v. A.A.A.

A Commentary on the Athletic Meeting by Mr. H. M. ABRAHAMS
Relayed from Fenner's, Cambridge
With Interludes by the WIRELESS
MTLITARY BAND with FRANK Foxon (Baritone) and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE
THIS afternoon's athletic meeting has more interest than the usual contest between a University and an outside club. Since the war Cambridge has supplied an unusually high proportion of athletes to the British Olympic teams, and Fenner's is now recognized as one of the most likely places to which to look for cracks capable of holding their own in the best company the world can provide.
So this year the meeting between the Varsity and the Amateur Athletic Association has been arranged as a sort of Olympic test. Cambridge are to be strengthened by the addition of some of the star products of recent years, and their team will include such famous athletes as H. B. Stallard , the miler and half-miler, D. G. A. Lowe, who has already run for Great Britain at Colombes, C. T. van Geyzel, the high jumper from Ceylon, and those two fine hurdlers, Lord Burghley and G. C. Weightmann-Smith . The encounter between these cracks and the stiong team brought down by the A.A.A. should make a most thrilling afternoon's sport, which listeners will hear described by Mr. H. M. Abrahams, himself an old Cambridge runner, and a former victor in the Olympic Game?, an article by whom on this afternoon's meeting will be found on page 425.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY v. A.A.A.

A Commentary on the Athletic Meeting by Mr. H. M. ABRAHAMS
Relayed from Fenner's, Cambridge
With Interludes by the WIRELESS
MTLITARY BAND with FRANK Foxon (Baritone) and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Personally conducted by JACK PAYNE
THIS afternoon's athletic meeting has more interest than the usual contest between a University and an outside club. Since the war Cambridge has supplied an unusually high proportion of athletes to the British Olympic teams, and Fenner's is now recognized as one of the most likely places to which to look for cracks capable of holding their own in the best company the world can provide.
So this year the meeting between the Varsity and the Amateur Athletic Association has been arranged as a sort of Olympic test. Cambridge are to be strengthened by the addition of some of the star products of recent years, and their team will include such famous athletes as H. B. Stallard , the miler and half-miler, D. G. A. Lowe, who has already run for Great Britain at Colombes, C. T. van Geyzel, the high jumper from Ceylon, and those two fine hurdlers, Lord Burghley and G. C. Weightmann-Smith . The encounter between these cracks and the stiong team brought down by the A.A.A. should make a most thrilling afternoon's sport, which listeners will hear described by Mr. H. M. Abrahams, himself an old Cambridge runner, and a former victor in the Olympic Game?, an article by whom on this afternoon's meeting will be found on page 425.
5XX Daventry

Music from the Russian Ballet

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by G. LESLIE HEWARD
THE Russian Ballet, which enjoys a unique reputation in so many countries of the world has earned our gratitude in- more than one way. It has furnished inspiration to a number of distinguished composers for some of their freshest and most attractive music, much of which is thoroughly enjoyable, even apart from the'dance to which of right it belongs.
IT was by his music ' La Boutique Fantasque ' that Respighi first made his name known to us in this country. Now, of course, we have had many opportunities of hearing him in more serious mood, but these fresh and dainty dances, made largely from the pianoforte music which Rossini composed in his latter days, will always have a very strong hold on our affections.
THE THREE CORNERED HAT is founded on a Spanish story in which a pompous corregidor seeks to seduce a miller's virtuous wife, only to meet with defeat at the hands of the lady and her watchful spouse.
In the first of the three Dances it is the eve of St... John's Festival, and the miller's neighbours have gathered about his house to dance, while the wine cup passes round.
The second number is danced by the miller himself, and the music presents an unmistakable picture of his sturdy figure.
At the opening of the third dance all is confusion ; several themes are intricately woven together, and two rhymes-3-4 and 6.8—are heard together. The dance itself is a brilliant Jota—one of the oldest and most popular traditional dance forms of Northern Spain.

Suite, ' La Boutique Fantasque ' - Rossini, arr. Respighi
9.50 Three Dances from ' The Three-Cornered Hat' de - Falla
10.0 Cimarosiana - Cimarosa, arr. Malipieso
10.15 Soheherezade - Rimsky.Korsakov
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Music from the Russian Ballet

THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by G. LESLIE HEWARD
THE Russian Ballet, which enjoys a unique reputation in so many countries of the world has earned our gratitude in- more than one way. It has furnished inspiration to a number of distinguished composers for some of their freshest and most attractive music, much of which is thoroughly enjoyable, even apart from the'dance to which of right it belongs.
IT was by his music ' La Boutique Fantasque ' that Respighi first made his name known to us in this country. Now, of course, we have had many opportunities of hearing him in more serious mood, but these fresh and dainty dances, made largely from the pianoforte music which Rossini composed in his latter days, will always have a very strong hold on our affections.
THE THREE CORNERED HAT is founded on a Spanish story in which a pompous corregidor seeks to seduce a miller's virtuous wife, only to meet with defeat at the hands of the lady and her watchful spouse.
In the first of the three Dances it is the eve of St... John's Festival, and the miller's neighbours have gathered about his house to dance, while the wine cup passes round.
The second number is danced by the miller himself, and the music presents an unmistakable picture of his sturdy figure.
At the opening of the third dance all is confusion ; several themes are intricately woven together, and two rhymes-3-4 and 6.8—are heard together. The dance itself is a brilliant Jota—one of the oldest and most popular traditional dance forms of Northern Spain.
5XX Daventry

' TWENTY YEARS On '— A DISCUSSION

between Mr. and Mrs. CLOUGH WILLIAMS ELLIS
WHAT of the future ? is a question that titillates our imagination as few others can, because we have all the data on which to build and only the sketchiest ideas of probability to hold us in check. In this evening's discussion, however, the talkers will not build castles in the rarified air of the far future of Mr. H. G. Wells or Mr. Bernard Shaw ; they will tackle the more practical question of whither our present tendencies will have led us in another twenty years. In particular. they will deal with the prospects of developing order out of that chaos into which our growing towns and mushroom suburbs are now being ever more deeply plunged.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

' TWENTY YEARS On '— A DISCUSSION

between Mr. and Mrs. CLOUGH WILLIAMS ELLIS
WHAT of the future ? is a question that titillates our imagination as few others can, because we have all the data on which to build and only the sketchiest ideas of probability to hold us in check. In this evening's discussion, however, the talkers will not build castles in the rarified air of the far future of Mr. H. G. Wells or Mr. Bernard Shaw ; they will tackle the more practical question of whither our present tendencies will have led us in another twenty years. In particular. they will deal with the prospects of developing order out of that chaos into which our growing towns and mushroom suburbs are now being ever more deeply plunged.
5XX Daventry

THE VICTOR OLOF SEXTET

FLORENCE HOLDING (Soprano)

SEXTET Fantasia on Grieg's Melodies - Urbach
9.50 FLORENCE HOLDING Who'll buy my !avender ? - German
Deirdre's Farewell to Scotland - arr. Kennedy-Fraser
To People who have Gardens arr. - Kennedy-Fraser
10.0 SEXTET Liebeslied (Love Song) - Kreisler
Pierrette - Chaminade
Colonial Song - Grainger
10.10 FLORENCE HOLDING I cannot lose thee for a day - M. Herbert
Violets - M. Herbert
A Birthday - Cowen
Slumber Song - Quilter
10.18 SEXTET Second Serenade - Toselli
Minuet - Paderewski
Air and Finale (' Manon ') - Massenet
5XX Daventry

AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THE WIRELESS Orchestra
(Leader, S. KNEALE-KELLEY)
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
RACHEL MORTON (Soprano) ROBERT BURNETT (Baritone)
WHEN the University of Breslau made
Brahms a Doctor of Philosophy he composed, as a graceful recognition of the honour, this Overture, building it out of the tunes of several popular students' songs. First we hear two tunes of Brahms' own composition and then appears the hymn-liko melody of The Stately Houne ; next, the air of the song called The Father of his country ; then the Freshman's. Song, blurted out on Bassoons, and, lastly, Gaudeamus igitur.
3.42 RACHEL MORTON and Orchestra
Selected Items
IN 1898, Elgar was asked to write a work for an important Festival. He was too busy to do so, and suggested that Coleridge-Taylor should be asked. The result was this Ballad, which helped to make the name of the young Composer, then only twenty-three.
The work begins with a roughly energetic introductory Theme on the Strings. Woodwind has the First Main Tune, Strings accompanying.
The opening matter having been repeated, an episode (starting with a lengthened form of the First Main Tune, on the Trumpet), leads to tho Second Main Theme (Muted Violins and Violas).
On this material the Ballad is built up. Though it has no actual story behind it, one can easily imagine it as a musical commentary on some old chivalric tale of love and warfare.
THIS scena comes from the last part of Coleridge-Taylor's setting of Longfellow's
Song of Hiawatha. lagoo, the wandering boaster, tells the Indians what ho has seen-the coming of a great canoe holding a hundred warriors, with white faces. Most people laugh at lagoo's story, but Hiawatha knows better. True is all lagoo tells us,' he declares, ' I have seen it in a vision.'
4.30 RACHEL MORTON
Selected Items
THE hero, Hercules, as a penance for a crime, had to hire himself out for three years. He took service with Omphale, Queen of Lydia, and worked at her side amongst the women-in so uncouth a manner as to win him many a blow. In this ' Symphonic Poem ' you may bear the whirl of the wheels, the derision of the Queen and the sorrow of the enslaved hero.
THE Scherzo reminds us that Dvorak, the son of a butcher-innkeeper, never lost his love of peasant ways. There is something here of the countryman's boisterous good humour, we might say almost of the horse-play variety.
The Last Movement is forceful and dramatic. It opens with a few bars' Introduction, and then the Brass boldly gives out the First Main Tune; this is dealt with for a few moments before the Clarinets have the Second Main Tune. As the Movement goes on wo hear tunes from each of the three previous Movements.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

THE WIRELESS Orchestra
(Leader, S. KNEALE-KELLEY)
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
RACHEL MORTON (Soprano) ROBERT BURNETT (Baritone)
WHEN the University of Breslau made
Brahms a Doctor of Philosophy he composed, as a graceful recognition of the honour, this Overture, building it out of the tunes of several popular students' songs. First we hear two tunes of Brahms' own composition and then appears the hymn-liko melody of The Stately Houne ; next, the air of the song called The Father of his country ; then the Freshman's. Song, blurted out on Bassoons, and, lastly, Gaudeamus igitur.
3.42 RACHEL MORTON and Orchestra
Selected Items
IN 1898, Elgar was asked to write a work for an important Festival. He was too busy to do so, and suggested that Coleridge-Taylor should be asked. The result was this Ballad, which helped to make the name of the young Composer, then only twenty-three.
The work begins with a roughly energetic introductory Theme on the Strings. Woodwind has the First Main Tune, Strings accompanying.
The opening matter having been repeated, an episode (starting with a lengthened form of the First Main Tune, on the Trumpet), leads to tho Second Main Theme (Muted Violins and Violas).
On this material the Ballad is built up. Though it has no actual story behind it, one can easily imagine it as a musical commentary on some old chivalric tale of love and warfare.
THIS scena comes from the last part of Coleridge-Taylor's setting of Longfellow's
Song of Hiawatha. lagoo, the wandering boaster, tells the Indians what ho has seen-the coming of a great canoe holding a hundred warriors, with white faces. Most people laugh at lagoo's story, but Hiawatha knows better. True is all lagoo tells us,' he declares, ' I have seen it in a vision.'
4.30 RACHEL MORTON
Selected Items
THE hero, Hercules, as a penance for a crime, had to hire himself out for three years. He took service with Omphale, Queen of Lydia, and worked at her side amongst the women-in so uncouth a manner as to win him many a blow. In this ' Symphonic Poem ' you may bear the whirl of the wheels, the derision of the Queen and the sorrow of the enslaved hero.
THE Scherzo reminds us that Dvorak, the son of a butcher-innkeeper, never lost his love of peasant ways. There is something here of the countryman's boisterous good humour, we might say almost of the horse-play variety.
The Last Movement is forceful and dramatic. It opens with a few bars' Introduction, and then the Brass boldly gives out the First Main Tune; this is dealt with for a few moments before the Clarinets have the Second Main Tune. As the Movement goes on wo hear tunes from each of the three previous Movements.
5XX Daventry

El Religious Service

From the Church of Our Lady- of Victories, Kensington
Order of Service :
Scripture Reading: Gospel of the 5th Sunday after Easter (John xvi, 23-30)
Hymn, Soul of my Saviour (Westminster Hymnal, No. 74) Address by the Rev. John P.
ABENDZEN, D.D., D.Ph., M.A.
(For 8.45-10-30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

El Religious Service

From the Church of Our Lady- of Victories, Kensington
Order of Service :
Scripture Reading: Gospel of the 5th Sunday after Easter (John xvi, 23-30)
Hymn, Soul of my Saviour (Westminster Hymnal, No. 74) Address by the Rev. John P.
ABENDZEN, D.D., D.Ph., M.A.
(For 8.45-10-30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

A Glazounov Concert

REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY Orchestra ; Leader,
S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by THE COMPOSER
Overture, ' Carnival '
THE Carnival Overture, which was produced in 1894, fulfils the promise of its title in so joyous a spirit that very little analysis of it can be required. It begins at once with a vigorous tune on the whole strength of the orchestra, hurrying along on swift feet. A broader melody played first by woodwinds and strings, breaks in on the first tune, but very soon the bustling measure of the opening returns. Again a more slowly moving melody breaks in on it, this time in very quiet mood, but it also gives way quite soon to the carnival spirit of the opening. Then there is a new section at a more moderate speed, in which there is an organ part, to be replaced at need by the orchestral instruments. But the merriment of the beginning returns finally to wind up the Overture in the most boisterous good spirits. REGINALD PAUL
Prelude and Fugue, Op. 62
ORCHESTRA
Suite, 'The Seasons'
This Suite of orchestral pieces is made up of music originally written for a ballet. Glazounov has more than once deserted the realm of purely symphonic music to compose ballets, and this is the best known of them. Melodious and graceful throughout, it is all happily descriptive of the scenes set before us-Winter, with its four variations of Hoar-Frost, Ice, Hail, and Snow ; the Spring comes next, and in her train are Zephyrs, Birds, and Flowers, which group themselves, in the ballet, affectionately about her. There is a dance of roses, and little solo dances for Spring herself, for a Bird, but at the approach of the warmth and of Summer, all the attendants of Spring vanish.
The third scene is Summer, a cornfield waving under a soft breath of wind. There is a waltz of Poppies and Cornflowers and then naiads appear, holding veils which represent Water; their dance is a flowing Barcarolle, and Summer comes to an end with a variation presenting the Htrs of Corn. It is interrupted for a moment by the sound of open-air music, and at the end Fauns and Satyrs appear playing rustic pipes. They engage in a battle for the Grain, but it is rescued by the Zephyr. The last movement begins with a Bacchanale of Autumn in which all the Seasons take part. It is a merry and vigorous movement in which first Winter, then Spring, and Summer, have dances of their own before a little slow movement presents something of the wistfulness of Autumn. Then a Satyr has a variation, and a merry dance of Fauns and Satyrs under a rain of dead leaves leads to the short apotheosis which closes the ballet.
REGINALD PAUL
Gavotte, Op. 49, No. 3 Idylle, Op. 103
Etude in E Minor, Op. 31, No. 2
ORCHESTRA
Poeme Lyrique, Op. 12
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A Glazounov Concert

REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY Orchestra ; Leader,
S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by THE COMPOSER
Overture, ' Carnival '
THE Carnival Overture, which was produced in 1894, fulfils the promise of its title in so joyous a spirit that very little analysis of it can be required. It begins at once with a vigorous tune on the whole strength of the orchestra, hurrying along on swift feet. A broader melody played first by woodwinds and strings, breaks in on the first tune, but very soon the bustling measure of the opening returns. Again a more slowly moving melody breaks in on it, this time in very quiet mood, but it also gives way quite soon to the carnival spirit of the opening. Then there is a new section at a more moderate speed, in which there is an organ part, to be replaced at need by the orchestral instruments. But the merriment of the beginning returns finally to wind up the Overture in the most boisterous good spirits. REGINALD PAUL
Prelude and Fugue, Op. 62
ORCHESTRA
Suite, 'The Seasons'
This Suite of orchestral pieces is made up of music originally written for a ballet. Glazounov has more than once deserted the realm of purely symphonic music to compose ballets, and this is the best known of them. Melodious and graceful throughout, it is all happily descriptive of the scenes set before us-Winter, with its four variations of Hoar-Frost, Ice, Hail, and Snow ; the Spring comes next, and in her train are Zephyrs, Birds, and Flowers, which group themselves, in the ballet, affectionately about her. There is a dance of roses, and little solo dances for Spring herself, for a Bird, but at the approach of the warmth and of Summer, all the attendants of Spring vanish.
The third scene is Summer, a cornfield waving under a soft breath of wind. There is a waltz of Poppies and Cornflowers and then naiads appear, holding veils which represent Water; their dance is a flowing Barcarolle, and Summer comes to an end with a variation presenting the Htrs of Corn. It is interrupted for a moment by the sound of open-air music, and at the end Fauns and Satyrs appear playing rustic pipes. They engage in a battle for the Grain, but it is rescued by the Zephyr. The last movement begins with a Bacchanale of Autumn in which all the Seasons take part. It is a merry and vigorous movement in which first Winter, then Spring, and Summer, have dances of their own before a little slow movement presents something of the wistfulness of Autumn. Then a Satyr has a variation, and a merry dance of Fauns and Satyrs under a rain of dead leaves leads to the short apotheosis which closes the ballet.
REGINALD PAUL
Gavotte, Op. 49, No. 3 Idylle, Op. 103
Etude in E Minor, Op. 31, No. 2
ORCHESTRA
Poeme Lyrique, Op. 12
5XX Daventry

RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From the Holy Trinity Church,
Brighton
Hymp 292
Lord's Prayer
Versicles and Responses
Psalm XV
Lesson
Collects
Anthem, ' Shepherd of Souls' Jones
Sermon by the Rev. R. J. CAMPBELL
, D.D.
Hymn 477
(For 8.45-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)






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