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5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.127) BACH

' HERR JESU CHRtST, AHR'R MENSCH UND GOTT'
(' Lord Jesu Christ , Thou Man and God ')
Relayed from ST. ANN'S CHURCH. MANCHESTER
I.—Chorus :
Lord Jesu Christ who Man became,
And knew Man's sorrow, grief and shame, Who on the Cross for me didstdie.
So Grace ight come from God on high. 0 Thou, our trials who didst know To me a sinner mercy show t
II.—-Recitative (Tenor) :
Yea. though mv soul, when that gread hoar appeareth, Shall fear the icy hand of death, and shrink before him when he nearrth,
Yea when my voice can nought but bitter sighings make,
And when my heart shall break : enough.
I trust in Him that saith,
' Behold, I am with theo ' ; 'twas He who died upon the Cross for me,
'Tis He. my soul to peace through tr&vai' leadeth,
And for my pardon lntercedeth. m.-Aria (Soprarw) :
My sou! shall rest in Jesu's keeping. When Earth this mortal body takes.
Oh, ring out soon, ye bells that call me
Of death no terror doth appal me.
With Jesus then my soul awakes.
IV.—Revitative and Aria (Bass):
When man at last Thy trumpet Heareth
And when the sea and land,
Yea, all that man doth cherish In ruin disappearcth,
Have mercy, Lord, nor let me perish ;
Thy servant. I before Thy Throne sha ! stand,
A guilty stnner humbly praying .. Do Thou abide with me
My Jesu ; my trust is in Thee,
O comfort Thou my spirit, saying.—
In truth I say to thec,
Though Heav'n and the earth are destroyed for ever,
So fear not, Thy Saviour forsakeththee never.
1.0, In that Day they shall not grieve. Nor shall they perish, that believe, Put all thy trust, my child, in Me;
I'or life everlasting to mankind I gave.
O'ercoming the power of death and the grave."
V.—Choral :
Oh, Lord, forgive Thy children all. And teach us to await Thy call
With gladsome heart and trusting soul; Oh, let Thy Spirit make us whole,
And give us Grace Thy way to keep, Until in Thee we fall on sleep.
(English Text by D. Millar Craig.
Copyright B.B.C. 1929.)
Cantatas for the next four weeks are :—
Match 9. No. 80.—Ein' feste Burg tst unser Gott (A Strong-hold Sure).
March 16. No. 114.—Ach, tteben Christen, Bed getrost (Beloved
Christians, weep no more).
March 23. Ko. 140.—Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers, wake).
March 30. No. 1.—Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How brightly shines the Morning Star).
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No.127) BACH

' HERR JESU CHRtST, AHR'R MENSCH UND GOTT'
(' Lord Jesu Christ , Thou Man and God ')
Relayed from ST. ANN'S CHURCH. MANCHESTER
I.—Chorus :
Lord Jesu Christ who Man became,
And knew Man's sorrow, grief and shame, Who on the Cross for me didstdie.
So Grace ight come from God on high. 0 Thou, our trials who didst know To me a sinner mercy show t
II.—-Recitative (Tenor) :
Yea. though mv soul, when that gread hoar appeareth, Shall fear the icy hand of death, and shrink before him when he nearrth,
Yea when my voice can nought but bitter sighings make,
And when my heart shall break : enough.
I trust in Him that saith,
' Behold, I am with theo ' ; 'twas He who died upon the Cross for me,
'Tis He. my soul to peace through tr&vai' leadeth,
And for my pardon lntercedeth. m.-Aria (Soprarw) :
My sou! shall rest in Jesu's keeping. When Earth this mortal body takes.
Oh, ring out soon, ye bells that call me
Of death no terror doth appal me.
With Jesus then my soul awakes.
IV.—Revitative and Aria (Bass):
When man at last Thy trumpet Heareth
And when the sea and land,
Yea, all that man doth cherish In ruin disappearcth,
Have mercy, Lord, nor let me perish ;
Thy servant. I before Thy Throne sha ! stand,
A guilty stnner humbly praying .. Do Thou abide with me
My Jesu ; my trust is in Thee,
O comfort Thou my spirit, saying.—
In truth I say to thec,
Though Heav'n and the earth are destroyed for ever,
So fear not, Thy Saviour forsakeththee never.
1.0, In that Day they shall not grieve. Nor shall they perish, that believe, Put all thy trust, my child, in Me;
I'or life everlasting to mankind I gave.
O'ercoming the power of death and the grave."
V.—Choral :
Oh, Lord, forgive Thy children all. And teach us to await Thy call
With gladsome heart and trusting soul; Oh, let Thy Spirit make us whole,
And give us Grace Thy way to keep, Until in Thee we fall on sleep.
(English Text by D. Millar Craig.
Copyright B.B.C. 1929.)
Cantatas for the next four weeks are :—
Match 9. No. 80.—Ein' feste Burg tst unser Gott (A Strong-hold Sure).
March 16. No. 114.—Ach, tteben Christen, Bed getrost (Beloved
Christians, weep no more).
March 23. Ko. 140.—Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers, wake).
March 30. No. 1.—Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How brightly shines the Morning Star).
5XX Daventry

A Recital

THE TEMPLARS (Madrigals)
RUDOLF DOLMETSCH (Harpsichord)
DR. JOHN BULL at the age of about twenty became organist of Hereford Cathedral, and three years later a member of the Chapel Royal. Although his position in the world of music was a very eminent one, and he was a Doctor of Music both of Cambridge and of Oxford, in 1591 his circumstances were so bad that he had to petition Queen Elizabeth 'to relieve his great poverty, which altogether hinders his studies.' He survived the Queen and continued to hold his foremost position in the next reign, and his fame spread to other parts of Europe, too. Ho left this country about 1613, and in 1617 became organist of Antwerp Cathedral. He died there, and is buried on the south side of Notre Dame, in the city which was also his birthplace.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RECITAL

THE TEMPLARS (Madrigals)
RUDOLF DOLMETSCH (Harpsichord)
DR. JOHN BULL at the age of about twenty became organist of Hereford Cathedral, and three years later a member of the Chapel Royal. Although his position in the world of music was a very eminent one, and he was a Doctor of Music both of Cambridge and of Oxford, in 1591 his circumstances were so bad that he had to petition Queen Elizabeth ' to relieve his great poverty, which altogether hinders his studies.' Ho survived the Queen and continued to hold his foremost position in the next reign, and his fame spread to other parts of Europe, too. Ho left this country about 1613, and in 1617became organist of Antwerp Cathedral. He died there, and is buried on the south sido of Notre Dame, in the city which was also his birthplace.
5XX Daventry

Excerpts from Rupert d'Oyly Carte's Production of 'The Mikado'

Written by W. S. GILBERT , com. posed by ARTHUR SULLIVAN
Relayed from Tho Savoy Theatre
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Excerpts from Rupert d'Oyly Carte's Production of 'The Mikado'

Written by W. S. GILBERT , com. posed by ARTHUR SULLIVAN
Relayed from Tho Savoy Theatre
5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No. 62) BACH

' NUN KOMM, DEB HEIDEN HEILAND '
(' Come Thou, the Heathen's
Saviour')
Relayed from THE GUILDHALL
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
MARY HAMLIN (Soprano) DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
STUART ROBERTSON (Baas)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (Oboes, Trumpet and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
ANOTHER Cantata based on this text has already been broadcast. It was one of the earlv Cantatas, and this one dates from some twenty years later, belonging to that group of fifteen simple chorale cantatas almost all of which haye by now, been included in the broadcast series. The first Chorus is built up on the chorale in the way with which listeners are now familiar, and the splendid orchestral accompaniment is founded mainly on one of those motives of happiness which Bach uses so often with such a fine sense of exaltation.
The two arias, both for men's voices, are among the best examples of solo numbers in the Cantatas, and the one for tenor is specially melodious and touching. When the bass voice sings of the Saviour's conflict with Evil, the accompanment, hold and vigorous, is built up on fine of the motives of strife and tumult with which Bach sets before us the image of battle and contending forces. The Cantata, much simpler than the other on the same text, Is none the less, a noble piece of-sacred music.
I.—Chorus :
Come Thou, the heathens' Saviour, Whom the Virgin Mother bore.
All the earth doth worship Thee, God will'd that so it might be.
II.—Aria (Tenor):
How wonderful are all His ways and His myst'ries :
In might He appeareth, the Lord of mankind...
The treasures of Heav'n are revealed before us,
And man in his need wondrous manna shall find.
Our hearts it awakens and might sheddeth o'er us.
III.—Recitative (Bast):
So from His heav'nly Throne, His might and Crown,
The Son of God came down.
As man the Prince of Juda came.
Our way with joyful heart He fareth, And for the fall'n His mercy caretb.
0 glorious Light, of wond'rous Love th' eternal Flame 1
IV.—Aria (Bass):
Strive Thou, conquer by Thy might,
Let Thine Arm be strong to guide us
Stand beside us,
In our Weakness do Thou take us, mighty make us.
V.—Recitative (Soprano and Alto) :
Then evermore we praise Thy Name, Our homage to Thy cradle bringing,
With joyful hearts our praises singing. For that the Saviour came.
Nor shall we fear our darkest night, Who know Thine everlasting Light.
VI.—Chorale :
Praise to Cod the Father, sing, Praise to God, His only. Son.
Praise to God. the Holy Ghost, Now and in Eternity.
English Text by D. Millar Craig. Copyright
B.B.C., 1929.
[We regret, that an error was made in acknowledging the source of the text of last Sunday's cantata. The English version of it is by W. G. Whittaker , and is included in the Oxford University Press edition of the Bach Church Cantatas.]
Cantatas for the next four Sundays are '—
December 8. No. 107-Was willst du dicb. betrüben ? (Why should'st thou grieve ?).
December 15. No. 125-Mit Fried und Freud fahr' ich dahin (In peace and joy I now depart).
December 22. No. 1-Wie schon leuchtet der
Morgenstern (How fair appears the morning star).
December 29. No. 122-Das neugebor'ne
Kindelein (The new born babe).
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

CHURCH CANTATA (No. 62) BACH

' NUN KOMM, DEB HEIDEN HEILAND '
(' Come Thou, the Heathen's
Saviour')
Relayed from THE GUILDHALL
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
MARY HAMLIN (Soprano) DORIS OWENS (Contralto)
ERIC GREENE (Tenor)
STUART ROBERTSON (Baas)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ) THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA (Oboes, Trumpet and Strings)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
ANOTHER Cantata based on this text has already been broadcast. It was one of the earlv Cantatas, and this one dates from some twenty years later, belonging to that group of fifteen simple chorale cantatas almost all of which haye by now, been included in the broadcast series. The first Chorus is built up on the chorale in the )Vay with which listeners are now familiar, and the splendid orchestral accompaniment is founded mainly on one of those motives of happiness which Bach uses so often with such a fine sense of exaltation.
The two arias, both for men's voices, are among the best examples of solo numbers in the Cantatas, and the one for tenor is specially melodious and touching. When the bass voice sings of the Saviour's conflict with Evil, the accompanment, hold and vigorous, is built up on fine of the motives of strife and tumult with which Bach sets before us the image of battle and contending forces. The Cantata, much simpler than the other on the same text, Is none the less, a noble piece of-sacred music.
I.—Chorus :
Come Thou, the heathens' Saviour, Whom the Virgin Mother bore.
All the earth doth worship Thee, God will'd that so it might be.
II.—Aria (Tenor):
How wonderful are all His ways and His myst'ries :
In might He appeareth, the Lord of mankind...
The treasures of Heav'n are revealed before us,
And man in his need wondrous manna shall find.
Our hearts it awakens and might sheddeth o'er us.
III.—Recitative (Bast):
So from His heav'nly Throne, His might and Crown,
The Son of God came down.
As man the Prince of Juda came.
Our way with joyful heart He fareth, And for the fall'n His mercy caretb.
0 glorious Light, of wond'rous Love th' eternal Flame 1
IV.—Aria (Bass):
Strive Thou, conquer by Thy might,
Let Thine Arm be strong to guide us
Stand beside us,
In our Weakness do Thou take us, mighty make us.
V.—Recitative (Soprano and Alto) :
Then evermore we praise Thy Name, Our homage to Thy cradle bringing,
With joyful hearts our praises singing. For that the Saviour came.
Nor shall we fear our darkest night, Who know Thine everlasting Light.
VI.—Chorale :
Praise to Cod the Father, sing, Praise to God, His only. Son.
Praise to God. the Holy Ghost, Now and in Eternity.
English Text by D. Millar Craig. Copyright
B.B.C., 1929.
[We regret, that an error was made in acknowledging the source of the text of last Sunday's cantata. The English version of it is by W. G. Whittaker , and is included in the Oxford University Press edition of the Bach Church Cantatas.]
Cantatas for the next four Sundays are '—
December 8. No. 107-Was willst du dicb. betrüben ? (Why should'st thou grieve ?).
December 15. No. 125-Mit Fried und Freud fahr' ich dahin (In peace and joy I now depart).
December 22. No. 1-Wie schon leuchtet der
Morgenstern (How fair appears the morning star).
December 29. No. 122-Das neugebor'ne
Kindelein (The new born babe).
5XX Daventry

Chamber Music

MARGOT HINNENBERG-LEFEBRE (Soprano)
THE KUTCHER TRIO:
SAMUEL KUTCHER (Violin)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello) REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
ALTHOUGH in one movement, the Trio is full of varied interest, and many changes of rhythm as well as of sentiment. It begins slowly with a theme which the violoncello has alone at first, and with which the violin answers him, and soon there is a much livelier section with a good deal of independence in the different instruments. It reaches a sturdy climax, and then we are led back to a return of the opening which is now made the basis of a new and melodious section. Again there is a moment of serenity, and all the instruments sink to a very soft tone, but the close is full of energy and emphasis, all the instruments joining at the very end to present a powerful version of one of the themes already heard.
Auch Heine Dinge (Even little things) :
ONE of the songs in the book of Italian lyrics, thia tells, with wonderful tenderness and charm, how even the little things of the world may be full of beauty and happiness. Most of the way through there is a melody in the left hand of the pianoforte part along with the one for the voice, while the right hand has a gently rippling figure.
Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen (Let us now make peace) :
ANOTHER of the Italian lyrics, this song, flowing with a very suave and quiet rhythm, as its subject demands, is a lover's plea for peace after a long and bitter cloud of misunderstanding.
Du denkst mit einem Fädchen (Thou'ldst hold me with a thread):
ALSO from the Italian lyrics, this song, in slow measure with a wayward and capricious accompaniment to its simple and melodious setting of the words, has something ironic alike in its music and its text, which it would be unfair to the singer to give away before the effective last line is heard. It begins ' Thou'ldst hold me with a slender thread and make me captive with a look.'
Ich hab'in Penna einen Liebsten wohnen (I have a sweetheart, lives in Penna):
Tms merry song, dancing along on swift steps, tells of one who has many sweethearts in different places. It is rounded off by a brilliant little postlude for the pianoforte alone.
ALTHOUGH nobody, considering the question in cold detachment, could be quite suro which of the two splendid Trios by Schubert is hia favourite, most people are quite certain, while actually hearing one or other, that it is not only the finer of the two, but among the best chamber music in existence. In the present age of hurry, when nobody has time to spare, it is sometimes criticized as being too long, and too full of repetitions. But all of it is so splendidly melodious, so full of all the grace and charm which Schubert, almost more than any other master, knows how to givo us, that few would wish to have it shortened.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Chamber Music

MARGOT HINNENBERG-LEFEBRE (Soprano)
THE KUTCHER TRIO:
SAMUEL KUTCHER (Violin)
CEDRIC SHARPE (Violoncello) REGINALD PAUL (Pianoforte)
ALTHOUGH in one movement, the Trio is full of varied interest, and many changes of rhythm as well as of sentiment. It begins slowly with a theme which the violoncello has alone at first, and with which the violin answers him, and soon there is a much livelier section with a good deal of independence in the different instruments. It reaches a sturdy climax, and then we are led back to a return of the opening which is now made the basis of a new and melodious section. Again there is a moment of serenity, and all the instruments sink to a very soft tone, but the close is full of energy and emphasis, all the instruments joining at the very end to present a powerful version of one of the themes already heard.
Auch Heine Dinge (Even little things) :
ONE of the songs in the book of Italian lyrics, thia tells, with wonderful tenderness and charm, how even the little things of the world may be full of beauty and happiness. Most of the way through there is a melody in the left hand of the pianoforte part along with the one for the voice, while the right hand has a gently rippling figure.
Nun lass uns Frieden schliessen (Let us now make peace) :
ANOTHER of the Italian lyrics, this song, flowing with a very suave and quiet rhythm, as its subject demands, is a lover's plea for peace after a long and bitter cloud of misunderstanding.
Du denkst mit einem Fädchen (Thou'ldst hold me with a thread):
ALSO from the Italian lyrics, this song, in slow measure with a wayward and capricious accompaniment to its simple and melodious setting of the words, has something ironic alike in its music and its text, which it would be unfair to the singer to give away before the effective last line is heard. It begins ' Thou'ldst hold me with a slender thread and make me captive with a look.'
Ich hab'in Penna einen Liebsten wohnen (I have a sweetheart, lives in Penna):
Tms merry song, dancing along on swift steps, tells of one who has many sweethearts in different places. It is rounded off by a brilliant little postlude for the pianoforte alone.
ALTHOUGH nobody, considering the question in cold detachment, could be quite suro which of the two splendid Trios by Schubert is hia favourite, most people are quite certain, while actually hearing one or other, that it is not only the finer of the two, but among the best chamber music in existence. In the present age of hurry, when nobody has time to spare, it is sometimes criticized as being too long, and too full of repetitions. But all of it is so splendidly melodious, so full of all the grace and charm which Schubert, almost more than any other master, knows how to givo us, that few would wish to have it shortened.
5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

Relayed from ALL SAINTSCHURCH,
Bournemouth
S.B. from Bournemouth
Address by the Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM Hymn 24, ' Sun of my soul' The Lord's Prayer
Versicles
Magnificat
Reading from Scripture Nuno Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn 266, 'Lead, Kindly Light Address
Hymn 437, ' For all the Saints'
Blessing
(For 8.45 to 10.30 Programmes see opposite page.)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

Relayed from ALL SAINTSCHURCH,
Bournemouth
S.B. from Bournemouth
Address by the Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM Hymn 24, ' Sun of my soul' The Lord's Prayer
Versicles
Magnificat
Reading from Scripture Nuno Dimittis
Prayers
Hymn 266, 'Lead, Kindly Light Address
Hymn 437, ' For all the Saints'
Blessing
(For 8.45 to 10.30 Programmes see opposite page.)
5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

WINIFRED DAVIS (Mezzo-Soprano)
NORMAN Williams (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
HIMSELF no sea-farer, Wagner yet contrives, in The Flying Dutchman, to present a very vivid picture of the sea and ships. He had read Heine's version of the old story of Vanderdecken and was already scheming to write an opera on the subject, when he made the acquaintanco of the North Sea in one of its grim and angry moods. He has recorded his own impressions of the journey : ' I shall never forget the voyage ; it lasted three weeks and a half..... The legend of the Flying Dutchman was confirmed by the sailors, and the circumstances gave it a definite and characteristic colour in my mind.'
In its original form, the opera was ' A
Dramatic Ballad,' to bo performed without a break. On its first performance, however, at Dresden, in 1843, it was divided, in accordance with convention, into throe acts, and for many years was always played in that form. The restoration to its original design is due to the late Sir Charles Stanford and the pupils of the Royal College, who performed it at tho Lyceum Theatre in London as Wagner originally intended. The result was so entirely successful that Bayreuth adopted it for performance there in 1901, and again in 1902, on the lines originally laid down by its composer.
The overture, forming, as it does, a concise epitome of the drama, is really an expansion of Senta's Ballad, which, in itself, embodies the whole germ of the story. It opens with the wild theme of the Dutchman's dread destiny, and storm and angry seas are vividly presented; the beautiful subject which portrays Senta, announced by the Cor Anglais , is also unmistakable.
ALTHOUGH we remember him best as a composer for the stage, and one who understood his own musical public as very few composers have done, Massenet left some purely orchestral music which is hardly less popular than his operas. And among them this Suite has always hold a favourite place. Though popular in the best sense, the music is thoroughly sound in workmanship, and full of that sensitive grace which makes French music so easy to enjoy. The claim which he makes in the name of these Scenes is no idle one ; if any music was ever picturesque, it certainly is. The names of the four movements are sufficient clue to the scenes they would set before us.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

WINIFRED DAVIS (Mezzo-Soprano)
NORMAN Williams (Bass)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
HIMSELF no sea-farer, Wagner yet contrives, in The Flying Dutchman, to present a very vivid picture of the sea and ships. He had read Heine's version of the old story of Vanderdecken and was already scheming to write an opera on the subject, when he made the acquaintanco of the North Sea in one of its grim and angry moods. He has recorded his own impressions of the journey : ' I shall never forget the voyage ; it lasted three weeks and a half..... The legend of the Flying Dutchman was confirmed by the sailors, and the circumstances gave it a definite and characteristic colour in my mind.'
In its original form, the opera was ' A
Dramatic Ballad,' to bo performed without a break. On its first performance, however, at Dresden, in 1843, it was divided, in accordance with convention, into throe acts, and for many years was always played in that form. The restoration to its original design is due to the late Sir Charles Stanford and the pupils of the Royal College, who performed it at tho Lyceum Theatre in London as Wagner originally intended. The result was so entirely successful that Bayreuth adopted it for performance there in 1901, and again in 1902, on the lines originally laid down by its composer.
The overture, forming, as it does, a concise epitome of the drama, is really an expansion of Senta's Ballad, which, in itself, embodies the whole germ of the story. It opens with the wild theme of the Dutchman's dread destiny, and storm and angry seas are vividly presented; the beautiful subject which portrays Senta, announced by the Cor Anglais , is also unmistakable.
ALTHOUGH we remember him best as a composer for the stage, and one who understood his own musical public as very few composers have done, Massenet left some purely orchestral music which is hardly less popular than his operas. And among them this Suite has always hold a favourite place. Though popular in the best sense, the music is thoroughly sound in workmanship, and full of that sensitive grace which makes French music so easy to enjoy. The claim which he makes in the name of these Scenes is no idle one ; if any music was ever picturesque, it certainly is. The names of the four movements are sufficient clue to the scenes they would set before us.
5XX Daventry

An Orchestral Concert

HERBERT THORPE (Tenor)
HARRY BRINDLE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
ALTHOUGH the composer of this spirited March is best known as a theatrical conductor, particularly for his long association with His Majesty's Theatre, and for his incidental music to plays, he has given us an imposing volume of music for orchestra, as well as some for voices, and pianoforte and chamber music. He is one of the very few, moreover, who regards the brass band as a sufficiently important medium to compose serious music for it. His Epic Symphony was specially written as the test piece in the chief competition at the Annual Festival and Contest for Brass Bands at the Crystal Palace in the autumn of 1926. FEw musicians ever had so adventurous a career as William Wallace , composer of Maritana. His father was a Military Bandmaster, and the young Wallace was born in Water-ford, Ireland, in 1812. He very quickly became a good player not only of violin and pianoforte, but of the clarinet, and was only seventeen when lie was given a church organist's post. He gave it up within a year, however, the violin attracting him more. In 1834 he played a violin Concerto of his own in Dublin, with such success that he might have looked forward to a prosperous career in that line. But his health gave way and he went to Australia in the hope of warding off a threatening lung trouble. Sheep farming was nominally his job there, but he continued to play his violin, not only as a recreation, but in concerts. Australia, however, failed to hold him either to his farming or his fiddle, and for some years he wandered over many parts of the world, experiencing such vicissitudes as earthquakes, battles between rival South American States, and even a narrow escape from the clutches of a tiger. But everywhere ho went his reputation as a violinist was enhanced.
By 1845 he was in London, and someone seems to have suggested to him that he should compose an opera. Maritana was the result; it appeared near the end of 1845, and was an immediate and assured success. It has ever since maintained its hold on the popular affections, although Wallace himself wrote other and better works afterwards.
IN the first half of last century Sir Henry Bishop held a loading place in the music of this country, as composer for the stage, particularly Covent Garden Opera and Drury Lane ; he was, too, one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society. His stage works are all practically forgotten, largely because their libretti had no enduring qualities, and he is best remembered today by one or two isolated songs. Some of these have all the spontaneous charm and simplicity of folk-songs, and My Pretty Jane might well be called a classic of its own naive and innocent order.
HARRY BRINDLE
PINSUTI spent a large ipart of his life in this country, though it was in his native Italy that his biggest works were produced. He came here as a youngster, to study music in London, returning to Italy at the age of sixteen to become a private pupil of Rossini's. Before he was twenty he came back to London and soon established himself as one of the foremost singing masters of the day, teaching both in London and in Newcastle. For many years he was Professor of Singing at the Royal Academy of Music, and had a share in training such distinguished artists as Grisi, Patti, Mario, and many others. He was a prolific composer and published close on 250 songs, many part songs and choruses, as well as some pianoforte music. Many of these enjoyed a tremendous vogue in the latter part of last century, and one or two are still popular. But in Italy he won more important successes with three Operas and special festival music for national occasions. He was created a Knight of the Italian Kingdom in 1878. ORCHESTRA
Selection, ' Show Boat' ................. Kern Waltz , ' La Source ' (The Fountain) ..
Waldteufel HERBERT THORPE and HARRY BRINDLE
The Battle Eve .................... Bonheur The Two Gendarmes ................ Offenbach
ORCHESTRA'
Phantasy, ' The Three Bears' ......Eric Coatee Tarantella, ' A. Day in Naples ' .......... Byng
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

An Orchestral Concert

HERBERT THORPE (Tenor)
HARRY BRINDLE (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL
ALTHOUGH the composer of this spirited March is best known as a theatrical conductor, particularly for his long association with His Majesty's Theatre, and for his incidental music to plays, he has given us an imposing volume of music for orchestra, as well as some for voices, and pianoforte and chamber music. He is one of the very few, moreover, who regards the brass band as a sufficiently important medium to compose serious music for it. His Epic Symphony was specially written as the test piece in the chief competition at the Annual Festival and Contest for Brass Bands at the Crystal Palace in the autumn of 1926. FEw musicians ever had so adventurous a career as William Wallace , composer of Maritana. His father was a Military Bandmaster, and the young Wallace was born in Water-ford, Ireland, in 1812. He very quickly became a good player not only of violin and pianoforte, but of the clarinet, and was only seventeen when lie was given a church organist's post. He gave it up within a year, however, the violin attracting him more. In 1834 he played a violin Concerto of his own in Dublin, with such success that he might have looked forward to a prosperous career in that line. But his health gave way and he went to Australia in the hope of warding off a threatening lung trouble. Sheep farming was nominally his job there, but he continued to play his violin, not only as a recreation, but in concerts. Australia, however, failed to hold him either to his farming or his fiddle, and for some years he wandered over many parts of the world, experiencing such vicissitudes as earthquakes, battles between rival South American States, and even a narrow escape from the clutches of a tiger. But everywhere ho went his reputation as a violinist was enhanced.
By 1845 he was in London, and someone seems to have suggested to him that he should compose an opera. Maritana was the result; it appeared near the end of 1845, and was an immediate and assured success. It has ever since maintained its hold on the popular affections, although Wallace himself wrote other and better works afterwards.
IN the first half of last century Sir Henry Bishop held a loading place in the music of this country, as composer for the stage, particularly Covent Garden Opera and Drury Lane ; he was, too, one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society. His stage works are all practically forgotten, largely because their libretti had no enduring qualities, and he is best remembered today by one or two isolated songs. Some of these have all the spontaneous charm and simplicity of folk-songs, and My Pretty Jane might well be called a classic of its own naive and innocent order.
HARRY BRINDLE
PINSUTI spent a large ipart of his life in this country, though it was in his native Italy that his biggest works were produced. He came here as a youngster, to study music in London, returning to Italy at the age of sixteen to become a private pupil of Rossini's. Before he was twenty he came back to London and soon established himself as one of the foremost singing masters of the day, teaching both in London and in Newcastle. For many years he was Professor of Singing at the Royal Academy of Music, and had a share in training such distinguished artists as Grisi, Patti, Mario, and many others. He was a prolific composer and published close on 250 songs, many part songs and choruses, as well as some pianoforte music. Many of these enjoyed a tremendous vogue in the latter part of last century, and one or two are still popular. But in Italy he won more important successes with three Operas and special festival music for national occasions. He was created a Knight of the Italian Kingdom in 1878. ORCHESTRA
Selection, ' Show Boat' ................. Kern Waltz , ' La Source ' (The Fountain) ..
Waldteufel HERBERT THORPE and HARRY BRINDLE
The Battle Eve .................... Bonheur The Two Gendarmes ................ Offenbach
ORCHESTRA'
Phantasy, ' The Three Bears' ......Eric Coatee Tarantella, ' A. Day in Naples ' .......... Byng
5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From Westminster Congregational
Church
Prayer of Invocation
Hymn, ' All people that on Earth do dwell' (Congregational Hymnary 1) (A. and M., No. 166)
Holy Scripture Te Deum
Prayer and The Lord's Prayer
Solo, How Lovely are Thy Dwellings ' (MISS ETHEL MAUNDER )
Offering and Voluntary
Hymn, ' Come, Thou Fount of every
Blessing (Cong. Hymnary, No. 497) (Tune, Hyfrydot 37, Appendix)
Sermon, The Rev. JonN MCNEILL Hymn, ' Jesu, Lover of my Soul'
(Cong. Hymnary, No. 369) (A. and M., No. 103)
The Blessing Silent Prayer
Vesper, ' Whilst the Night dews are distilling' (Cong. Hymnary, No. 603, v. 3)
(For 8.15-10.30 Programmes see opposite page)
5XX Daventry

THE CHAPLIN TRIO

A Toye; His Dreams; His Conceit; His Rest;
His Humour (A Wayward Fancy) The Fitz William Collection, which embraces many valuable works of art besides its collection of music, was bequeathed to Cambridge University in 1816 by Viscount Fitz William. Partly printed and partly in manuscript, it contained many fine old English pieces which would otherwise have boon hopelessly lost-a veritable storehouse on which scholars and musicians are still drawing freely. One of the most interesting, as it is one of the most valuable, books in the collection, is the volume which used to be known as ' Queen Elizabeth's Virginal Book,' now called "The Fitz-William Virginal Book. ' The binding alone makes it a specially prized possession, but the beautifully written music which it holds is a unique collection of old English compositions. Many works are dated, and it is clear that the book can never have belonged to Queen Elizabeth, although the actual origin of it and its early history are still something of a mystery.
The Virginal was a little keyboard instrument rather like a Spinet, and was certainly popular in England in Tudor times. Henry VIII is supposed to have played it well. and in old histories we read that although Queen Elizabeth was a good performer, she was surpassed by Queen Mary. Mention of the instrument can be found in Stuart records, too, although by that time the harpsichord had begun to be more generally played. Quite a number of Virginals may still be seen in museums; there is a specially fine example by the English maker, John Loosemore , made in 1655, in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. It is elaborately decorated with painted panels.

KATE CHAPLIN (Viola d'Amore) MABEL CHAPLIN (Viola da Gamba) NELLIE CHAPLIN (Harpsichord) Trio. 'Fancies from FitzWiHiam Collection ' - Giles Farnaby, arr. Chaplin Trio
Harpsichord Solo - Scarlatti
Viola d'Amore Solo, 'Plaisir d'Amour' (Love's Happiness). - Martini
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

THE CHAPLIN TRIO

A Toye; His Dreams; His Conceit; His Rest;
His Humour (A Wayward Fancy) The Fitz William Collection, which embraces many valuable works of art besides its collection of music, was bequeathed to Cambridge University in 1816 by Viscount Fitz William. Partly printed and partly in manuscript, it contained many fine old English pieces which would otherwise have boon hopelessly lost-a veritable storehouse on which scholars and musicians are still drawing freely. One of the most interesting, as it is one of the most valuable, books in the collection, is the volume which used to be known as ' Queen Elizabeth's Virginal Book,' now called "The Fitz-William Virginal Book. ' The binding alone makes it a specially prized possession, but the beautifully written music which it holds is a unique collection of old English compositions. Many works are dated, and it is clear that the book can never have belonged to Queen Elizabeth, although the actual origin of it and its early history are still something of a mystery.
The Virginal was a little keyboard instrument rather like a Spinet, and was certainly popular in England in Tudor times. Henry VIII is supposed to have played it well. and in old histories we read that although Queen Elizabeth was a good performer, she was surpassed by Queen Mary. Mention of the instrument can be found in Stuart records, too, although by that time the harpsichord had begun to be more generally played. Quite a number of Virginals may still be seen in museums; there is a specially fine example by the English maker, John Loosemore , made in 1655, in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. It is elaborately decorated with painted panels.






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