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6LV Liverpool

The City Police Band at Play

THE BAND OF THE LIVERPOOL CITY POLICE
(By kind permission of the Watch Committee and the Chief Constable, Mr. Lionel D. L. Everitt, O.B.E.)
Conductor : Chief Inspector Charles R. Bicks, Bandmaster
'MISS LUCY LONG' - our domestic help - slumbers; it is time to rise, however, and efforts are made to induce her to do so. She yawns, and (Allegretto) gets up. She is heard coming downstairs, where she proclaims herself loudly (Moderato). The next movement 'Lucy' is discovered at her work ; and while she works, she sings her favourite melodies in her own particular style. Becoming more than usually frivolous, she indulges in some eccentricities which bring about an appalling disaster to the crockery! The Adagio, which follows, depicts her remorse ; she soon recovers her spirits, however, and tells all and sundry that 'Charlie is my darling.' We next meet her on Hampstead Heath: it is Bank Holiday, and 'Lucy' enjoys the fun - and a waltz. Later, they drop into 'ragtime.' Now we are interested listeners to a bit of love-making between ' Charlie ' (Trombone) and 'Lucy' (Bassoon), and after a suggestion of ' Haste to the Wedding,' 'Lucy ' pets married, and will have the Wedding March-in 'ragtime,' too!
'THE Church Clock Strikes Four '; 'A Hunting We Will Go'; 'John Peel,' and some
of his eccentricities. He attends the Hunt Dinner, and will sing 'Drinking': after this, he is very sad and only recovers with the aid of a spirited Cake-Walk.
5GB Daventry (Experimental)

Shakuntala

The Sixth of the Series of Twelve Great Plays is 'Shakuntala,' or The Lost Ring An Indian Drama, translated into English prose and verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa, by Sir Monier Monier-Williams, K.C.I.E.
The Play will be broadcast from 5GB tonight at 8.0, and from London and Daventry on Wednesday night. The programme and a special article on the Play will be found on pages 338 and 339.
An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.
This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.
The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuntala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
5XX Daventry

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
2LO London

Shakuntala

or 'The Lost Ring'
An Indian Drama

A modern Indian drawing of the Spirit of Music with the Satar, an instrument used to accompany every Indian play.
An Indian Drama Translated into English Prose and Verse from the Sanskrit of Kalidasa by Sir Monier.Monier-WiUiams, K.C.I.E.
Adapted for broadcasting by Dulcima Glisby Produced by Howard Rose The Persons : Story Teller Stage Manager Actress Charioteer Dushyanta, King of India Shakuntala, daughter of the sage Viswamitra and the nymph Menaka, foster-child of the hermit Kanwa Priyamvada Anasuva .. female attendants, companions of Shakuntala Riavatika, the warder or doorkeeper Mathavya, the jester and companion of the King Karabhaka, a messenger of the Queen-mother Gautami, a Holy Matron, Superior of the female inhabitants of the Hermitage Kanwa, Chief of the Hermits, foster-father of Shakuntala Sarngarava Two Brahmans, belonging to the Hermitage Saradwava/ of Kanwa Somarata, the Domestic Priest Mitravasu, brother-in-law cf the King, and Superintendent of the City Police Vatayana, the Chamberlain or Attendant on the Women's Apartments Suchaka Januka Two Constables Vetravati, Female Warder or Doorkeeper Latitha Matali, Charioteer of Indra Sarva-Damana, afterwards Bharata, a little boy, son of Dushyanta by Shakuntala Kasyapa, a Divine Sage, Progenitor of Men and Gods, Son of Marichi, and Grandson of Brahma Aditi, Wife of Kasvapa. Grand-daughter of Brahma through her Father, Daksha Fishermen, Officers, and Hermits
BENEDICTION:
Isa preserve you! he who is revealed in these eight forms by man perceptible — Water of all creation's works the first; The Fire that bears on high the sacrifice Presented with solemnity to Heaven; The Priest, the Holy Offerer of gifts; The Sun and Moon, those two majestic orbs, Eternal marshallers of day and night; The subtle Ether vehicle of sound, Diffused throughout the boundless Universe; The Earth, by sages called 'the place of Birth' of all material essences and things; And Air, which giveth life to all that breathe.

An Introduction to the Play by Vishnu Karandikar.

This poetic drama, written nearly fifteen hundred years ago by Kalidasa, represents India in the series of Great Plays. Shakuntala will be broadcast from 5GB on Monday, and from other Stations on Wednesday.

The story of an innocent maiden, dazzled by the glamour and polish of court life, taken advantage of and forsaken by the sophisticated cavalier, is perhaps as old as civilization itself. But, accepting the date given to Kalidasa by Western scholars, the story of Shakuntala, the girl of the hermitage, round whom Kalidasa wove his beautiful drama about 1,400 years ago, would charm even the most up-to-date flapper from the joyland of jazz. The story is simple - Dushyanta, the worldly-wise King, surfeited with the luxury of the palace and the company of the glittering beauties of his court, leaves his capital for a while and goes a-hunting. He comes across a group of young innocent girls from a famous hermitage, and the unpolished beauty, the natural charm, and the engaging innocence of the orphan girl Shakuntala attracts him. The girl is impressed by the courtly manners of the King and succumbs to his charms, after he had told her that they were married according to the Gandharva form of marriage based on free choice, then held legal under Hindu law. The King in due course of time leaves her and returns to his palace. The ascetic, Kanva, who has brought Shakuntala up ever since she was found as a baby in the forest near his hermitage, sends her with a couple of his disciples to King Dushyanta. Just before, a visiting sage had cursed Shakuntala for her neglect and she was unaware of the curse. The ring given by Dushyanta, which alone had the power of bringing back the memory of Shakuntala to his wayward mind, was unfortunately lost on the way to the King's court in a large pond outside the capital. Dushyanta repudiates her, the disciples of Kanva refuse to allow her to go back with them, and she is then miraculously taken away by her mother, who was a celestial dancer at the court of the God of Rain.

Later on, a fisherman is caught with the ring, which he had found in a fish caught in the pond. He is taken to the King, who remembers Shakuntala on seeing the ring, and begins to pine for her. Just then, Indra, the God of Rain, sends his celestial chariot, which can travel through the air, to King Dushyanta, asking him to help in subduing a recalcitrant demon. While returning the King halts on a famous mountain, noted to be the residence of one of the most respected sages of old, and sees a small boy, holding a lion cub in one hand and repelling the attacks of a lioness with a small stick in the other. He dis covers that it is his own son, Shakuntala having given birth to him in the hermitage, where she was placed by her mother. The King had no heir, and the sudden discovery of such a fearless son adds to the joy of his reconciliation with the forest maiden, but now known to be so well connected, with influence even with the King of Gods, Indra.

Anyone familiar with the mentality of the aristocracy of the land, when it comes into touch with the people of the country, would follow King Dushyanta with pleasure and see the subtle art of the poet when he makes the King compare the girls in the hermitage with the ladies of his court: 'The woodland plants outshine the garden flowers!' There is again the same touch of delicate irony when the old lady of the hermitage unconsciously interrupts Dushyanta's passionate wooing of Shakuntala and inquires whether her fever was subsiding. 'I am sprinkling holy water on you,' she naively informs the love-lorn maiden, 'and I am sure you will be all right now.' The dramatic way in which Dushyanta is prevented from kissing Shakuntala on the stage and thus committing an unpardonable scientific error, is also one more example of the varied talent of Kalidasa. Seeing the approach of the old lady, some of Shakuntala's girl friends, who had been keeping watch outside the bower of creepers where Dushyanta and Shakuntala were having their first love scene, cry out a warning and the kiss is not given.

Act four of the Shakuntala drama is perhaps the most moving. The fifth and sixth acts are also full of pathos. Here the art of the author is startlingly evident. The fourth act indicates the sorrow of the people of the hermitage and even that of the trees and the animals and birds at the thought of parting with Shakuntala. The fifth act, where the King spurns Shakuntala, having forgotten her is vividly descriptive of another kind of pathos. If Shakuntala was stirred by the pathetic scenes of the fourth act, she became indignant at the insinuations and jeers of the King's court in the fifth. The dramatic contrast between these two acts is one of the most moving spectacles in Shakuntala. The heroine sheds tears of sympathy in the one, while she is torn with grief and anger in the other.

The distress of Shakuntala and her struggle against all odds, the fighting spirit shown in her vigorous duel of words with the insulting king, all these are woven into the structure of the fifth act. The sixth is the repentance of the King. Kalidasa shows himself to be the master of the art of debate and wonderfully skilful in depicting the varying emotions of different types of people. The sorrowful ascetic Kanva, the indignant Shakuntala, the supremely arrogant King in the fifth act and the repentant sinner in the sixth, all these are shown with an amazingly lively pen. which would reflect credit on the master-writer of modem times.

The fourth act, thus, has been known as the best of all the works of Kalidasa. The trees drop their flowers at the feet of Shakuntala, the birds are weeping, the pet deer are circling round their mistress, the old ascetic feels almost benumbed with grief. He says: 'My sorrow will not disappear with time, oh Shakuntala ; because the trees you have planted round the hermitage will be growing and will always remind me of your sweet childhood.'

'A girl is always brought up as a trust for others,' sighs the sage, 'but she has to be delivered over to her lover when the time comes. If such are the pangs of sorrow to an ascetic living secluded in a hermitage in a forest, I wonder what would be the grief of parents living in towns surrounded by their families.'

In order to make a break between the pathetic and highly emotional fifth and the equally touching scenes of repentance of the sixth act, the author has introduced a little scene of diversion, which, however, vitally develops the plot of the play.

The King's men, as the police were called then, have caught the fisherman with the signet ring of the king, lost by Shakuntala.

Clothed with petty authority, the police were as willing to throw him to the crows and jackals, when they suspected him of crime, as they were eager to make friends with him over a jar of wine, at his expense, when they found that the King was pleased.

That even in hermitages situated on almost inaccessible mountains there should be painted earthen toys for children, indicates the type of civilized society found in India even then. The dramatic touch of the poet is again visible when the boy's attendant calls out 'See this Shakuntalavanya' — 'the beauty of the bird’ and the boy, who was engaged in interesting conversation with the King, has heard only the first half of the word and thinking that his, mother had arrived says: 'Oh where is my mother?' Dushyanta thus comes to know that it is his own son, without breaking the usual etiquette by asking about the child's parentage. Little touches like these render a distinctive charm to the masterpiece of Kalidasa.

I would like to give more extracts describing the passionate sorrow of the animate as well as inanimate residents, so graphically painted by Kalidasa. But to those who would care to weep along with Shakuntala's friends I would recommend the translations of the drama which have been published. Shakuniala is one of the precious 'treasures of Indian literature, and its hold on the Indian people is as powerful as it was 1,400 years ago when it was written.
2LO London

Professor H. MUNROFox : ' Mind in Animals — VI, Animal Intelligence.' Relayed from Birmingham

TN his last talk this evening, Professor
Fox proceeds to the question of animal intelligence as based on animal instinct, with which he dealt in his previous two talks. Few people who have cither kept pets or watched wild animals would deny their intelligence, but the border-line between the active mental process and the automatic reaction to instinct is difficult to draw and must remain a fascinating subject of speculation.
5XX Daventry

Professor H. MUNROFox : ' Mind in Animals — VI, Animal Intelligence.' Relayed from Birmingham

TN his last talk this evening, Professor
Fox proceeds to the question of animal intelligence as based on animal instinct, with which he dealt in his previous two talks. Few people who have cither kept pets or watched wild animals would deny their intelligence, but the border-line between the active mental process and the automatic reaction to instinct is difficult to draw and must remain a fascinating subject of speculation.
2LO London and 5XX Daventry

Professor H. MUNROFox : ' Mind in Animals — VI, Animal Intelligence.' Relayed from Birmingham

TN his last talk this evening, Professor
Fox proceeds to the question of animal intelligence as based on animal instinct, with which he dealt in his previous two talks. Few people who have cither kept pets or watched wild animals would deny their intelligence, but the border-line between the active mental process and the automatic reaction to instinct is difficult to draw and must remain a fascinating subject of speculation.
National Programme Daventry

The B.B.C. Dance Orchestra

Directed by Henry Hall
(All Nationals except Daventry)

5.15 Daventry
The Children's Hour
'The Zoo Man' will conduct a tour round the London Zoo
The quality that makes the Zoo Man's talks so enchanting to children is his power to see animals almost as human beings. He himself is thrilled just now with yet another pet, for Diana, the Pigmy Hippopotamus, has just presented the Zoo with a tiny calf. Diana came from West Africa in 1913, when she was believed to be ten or more years of age; so she is now quite an old lady. He well remembers her first calf and how excited they all were at the Zoo when they knew of its arrival.
It was born early one morning and, in the evening, they decided to allow Diana to go into her warmed pool and to take her tiny baby with her if she felt so inclined. They sat up in the Hippo house until very late that night and watched. Out of her den came Diana, the baby following close at her heels, though only a few hours old. Into the water she plunged, while the babe stood undecided on the brink. She came to the edge and coaxed it, and presently, its mind made up, it too made a plunge. It had never seen water before, but proved to be able to swim like a fish.
Wouldn't you all like to be the Zoo Man? Certainly the next best thing is to go with him on a microphone tour round the Zoo this afternoon.
Light Programme

LISTEN WITH MOTHER

A programme for children under five
Nursery rhymes stories, and music
' Mummy,' said a small listener, ' What is a "junior lamb"?' The answer was, of course, ' Julia Lang. ' who is back on the air today to begin her next monih as storyteller for our under-fives.
Tomorrow she will repeat
Dorothy E. Brown 's story called ' Mousie,' about a little girl whose pet was an imaginary mouse. Mothers who have watched their children at play with their own imag.nary friends will understand why so many boys and girls liked this tale when they heard it before, and will know, too, how important a part such make-believe act vi y plays in their development. For as yet they hardly distinguish between the real and the imaginary, and in playing out these fantasies they are finding their way about life, re-living experiences they have already had, combining different experiences into completely new ones, and experimenting with new situations of their own creating. Thus anything which finds its way into their everyday lives may reappear in their play, though, to the grown-up, their choice of ' friends ' is sometimes undoubtedly unexpected-for example, one youngster we heard ot had adopted a sea-!ion, and another found a girl-friend called ' School Fees 'I Elizabeth A. Taylor
Light Programme

LISTEN' WITH MOTHER

A programme for children under five
' He likes it here because he has food and milk and someone to take care of him,' said a little girl as she watched her ' rather grown-up ' black and white kitten. She had listened to Jtan Surchliffe’s story of ' Peter the little Black Kitien ,' and as her mother said, she attributed some of Peter's sentiments ' to her own p:t. In evoking by example, which is always more forceful than precept, such interested and sympathetic consideration by the children of the needs and natures of their pets, our stories can help to incu'cate those ideas of kindness to animals which we would have them develop. This story of the homeless kitten, which has remained a favourite since its first broadcast on the first day of this series, will be heard again on Friday this week.
Tomorrow, being May Day. brings
' The May Day Tree.' by Susanne Hale. It is based on an old country custom and after its broadcast last year we were told of a family of children whose delight in its pretty theme prompted them quite spontaneously to emulation. They. too, took a branch and decked it with flowers and danced like the children in the story.
Elizabeth A. Taylor
BBC Home Service Basic

CHILDREN'S HOUR

For Children of Most Ages
' The Singing Forest' by H. Mortimer Batten told by Derek McCulloch
2 — ' The Yellowface Raider'
In this story from the above book, Corrie, the pet red deer calf, tries to escape and join his own kind, but the alarming experience of the yellowface raider makes him think again ...
5.20 'The Atom Chasers'
A serial play in six parts by Angus MacVicar
2 — ' The Anchorite's Cave '
Produced by Kathleen Garscadden
Sandy, Jock, and Willie are convinced that a spy is at work in the West Highland parish of Dunglass. One dark evening they follow two unidentified figures from the Atom Station to the front gate of Major Morrison's house. Willie is left to keep watch on the gate, while Sandy and Jock climb the high wall above the greenhouse. As they crane their necks to see the strangers coming up the drive, they overbalance and fall with a crash ...
5.50 Children's Hour prayers conducted by the Rev. Clifford Smith
4—' Ambush for Ostriches'
BBC Television

Armand and Michaela Denis On Safari: The Giant Watusi

Armand and Michaela journey to Ruanda, the home of the giant Watusi people. There they visit a native law-court, a school of sculpture, and watch the Watusi dancers. During the programme some new pets are introduced -Voodoo the vulture, with Jackie and Marilyn, the monkeys.
(Previously televised on Mar. 29, 1957)
BBC Television

Animal Magic

A fortnightly series in which Johnny Morris looks at Creatures Great and Small.

Keeper Morris
Johnny Morris has always wanted to be a keeper. He seizes a chance at Bristol Zoo. Will it be the adventure of his dreams?

Badgers
More about Tony Soper's pet, Qandy, and about a badger watch with Eric Ashby.

In the New Forest
A visit to Sven Berlin's Zoo, an animal farm with a difference.

From the West
Light Programme

ROUNDABOUT

Switch on the off-beat circuit with COLIN HAMILTON for news, views, comments and the best on record plus
RAY ELLINGTON AND HIS MUSIC
Script by Tony Aspler
Produced by PETER DUNCAN and JOHN CHATFIELD
BBC One London

Watch with Mother: Picture Book

For the very young
Vera McKechnie turns the pages.
BBC film
(to 11.00)

For the next six weeks the afternoon edition of 'Watch with Mother' on BBC-1 will be replaced by a repeat of 'Play School,' the morning programme which is running on BBC-2
Can you remember what it was like to be four years old? Everything you saw was new. But your hands were still uncertain servants. Your feet were not allowed to take you exploring far beyond your own front door. Your mind bubbled with ideas but you did not have enough words to express them. This child you once were is Play School's target audience.
Turn on your set and you will see-a house. The door opens and lets you into a room which very soon you will feel you know: Humpty Dumpty, Jemima, and Teddy live in the toy cupboard by the blackboard. The shelves are full of books. The picture board might show one of your own paintings one day. There is a corner for pets; a table for scientific experiments; seven pegs carry an ever-changing selection of dressing-up clothes; and a large hamper overflows with useful oddments for making things.
So far Play School offers the standard equipment of any good nursery school. But it also has at its disposal all the imaginative resources of television-lights that can transform a blank wall into an apple orchard, lenses that turn men into giants, film that can show anything from a spider spinning its web to a rocket ship on its way to the moon.
Above all, Play School offers a stream of exciting people-not only experts in the field of nursery education but visitors from the world of adult entertainment. Ted Moult describes his farm. George Melly provides an ABC of jazz. Many accept for the first time the challenge of shaping their material without condescension to the needs of this specialised audience. A team of twelve young men and women present the programmes, pairing up a week at a time with changing partners-a system which keeps the chemistry fresh for viewers and performers.
This testimonial from a couple of teachers whose daughter has watched Play School from the start is typical of the many letters we receive from parents: 'Her imagination has been stimulated, her language enriched and the creative ideas which are a feature of the programme have started her on many an hour of effective learning through play.'
We hope that this week-with Athene Seyler, Beryl Roques and Brian Cant-what has been true every day for thousands of children on BBC-2 can now be true during the summer holidays for the wider audience on BBC-1.
(Joy Whitby)
BBC One London

Clapperboard

Films from home and abroad.
including

The Pogles
Mr. and Mrs. Pogle plant a magic bean and feed it with bilberry wine.

King Midas
A king's love for gold brings about an impossible situation.

Heiner and his Cockerels
Heiner forgets his three cockerels when he meets other friends, but afterwards they help his pets to find him.

Aza at the Seaside
The adventures of some children and their dog Aza on the Baltic coast.

Introduced by Gary Watson.
BBC One London

* OUT OF SCHOOL

A preview of some future television broadcasts for Schools and Colleges. Programmes today and tomorrow are from series for Primary Schools. Series for Secondary Schools will be shown next Tuesday and Wednesday
1.45 WATCH!
A programme from this weekly series for six-year-olds
Introduced by ROSANNE HARVEY Produced by HELEN NICOLL
2.0 PRIMARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS
Facts into Pictures
Names, pets, pop groups, and shoe sizes: the programme shows how graphs can bring to life facts and figures collected by children. Introduced by Jim BOUCHER Produced by DAVID ROSEVEARE
BBC Two England

ALMOST HUMAN

How to live with animals and look after them
Introduced by Di Fisher with Stanley Dangerfield and Peter West
THE QUEEN'S CORGIS
When the Queen visited the Three Counties Show at Malvern Wells, she watched the judging of the Pembroke Welsh Corgis, which for more than thirty years have had a special place in the life of the Royal Family. There were more corgis on show at Malvern this year than any other breed of dog. Is it royal patronage that makes them popular? Is the corgi an ideal dog for the home? What happens to a working dog like the corgi or labrador when it is bred as a domestic pet? Research:
Stanley Dangerfield , Suzanne Baker
Director, MARY DAVID
Producer, BRIAN ROBINS
BBC One London

Dog Watch

5: The Family Pet
So you want to buy a puppy - how do you make sure he's going to be the right dog in your home? And how best can you keep him fit and happy?
In the last programme in this series Peter West seeks expert advice from
A Veterinary Surgeon
Charles Cruft , dog specialist
Jack Kenworthy , Chairman of The Kennel Club Obedience Council
David Churchman , who directs his weekly obedience training class with a demonstration by FRANK SMITH and 'JAFF'- 1971 Obedience Champion dog at Cruft's.
Producer MARY EVANS
BBC One London

Dog Watch

In the last programme in the series Peter West seeks expert advice on family pets from a veterinary surgeon, Charles Cruft, dog specialist [and] Jack Kenworthy, Chairman of The Kennel Club Obedience Council.






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

About this project

Welcome to BBC Genome

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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