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BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science serves the Arts: 1: Science and Music

Among the multitude of new scientific developments artists are finding many which help them in their work. John Borwick discusses with Tristram Cary the use a modern composer makes of electronic equipment to increase his range of sounds and whether he is influenced by modern recording techniques.
For Schools
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science serves the Arts: 2: The Anatomy of Painting

Many modern art galleries have their own laboratories. Here scientific techniques are used to probe beneath the surface of old paintings and rediscover the methods and materials used by the masters of the past.
Michael Heckford shows some examples of these techniques and explains how a modern artist uses the technical advances of his own times to help him broaden the scope of his work.
For Schools
Repeated on Thursday at 10.5 a.m.
See page 18
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science serves the Arts: 3: Translation by Machine

Modern communications are turning the world into a Tower of Babel, and yet few people speak more than one language. Donald Booth describes how science is trying to help not only the translator but those research workers engaged in analysing great writings of the past.
For Schools
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: 4: The Paper Problem

As the world becomes educated an avalanche of printed paper is engulfing libraries. Donald Booth shows how the new National Lending Library is tackling the problem.
For Schools
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science serves the Arts: 5: Revealing the Past

The art of the historian is based on analysing the evidence from manuscripts, relics, and archaeological sites. This analysis is now helped by new scientific techniques. Brian Hope-Taylor chooses the Anglo-Saxon period to illustrate some of them.
For Schools
Repeated on Thursday at 10.5 a.m.
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

For Sixth Forms: Science serves the Arts: 5: Revealing the Past

The art of the historian is based on analysing the evidence from manuscripts, relics, and archaeological sites. This analysis is now helped by new scientific techniques. Brian Hope-Taylor chooses the Anglo-Saxon period to illustrate some of them.
For Schools
(to 11.55)
BBC Television

Out of School

An opportunity to see some of the programmes which BBC Television provides for schools throughout the year. Today's programmes are two examples from a series planned for sixth forms of grammar schools and which aim to provide a common experience for both science and arts specialists.

12.5 For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: Revealing the Past
The art of the historian is based on analysing the evidence from manuscripts, relics, and archaeological sites. Science plays a part in this analysis and recently many new techniques have become available. Brian Hope-Taylor chooses the Anglo-Saxon period to illustrate some of them.
Previously shown in February

12.30 For Sixth Forms: Cubism and After: A Sum of Destructions
Written by David Sylvester and Michael Gill.
Modern art can be seen as the destroyer of many accepted conventions in painting and sculpture. No single artist has played a greater part in the artistic revolution than Pablo Picasso, who in 1907 painted Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, generally considered the key work in the development of Cubism, the most influential movement in modern art.
Previously shown in November 1962

(to 12.55)
BBC Television

Out of School

An opportunity to see some of the programmes which BBC Television provides for schools and technical colleges throughout the year. Today's programmes are designed for older students and both will be shown in the new academic year.

1.46 For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: The Anatomy of Painting
A series which aims to provide a common experience for both science and arts specialists.
Many modern art galleries have their own laboratories. Here scientific techniques are used to probe beneath the surface of old paintings and rediscover the methods and materials used by the masters of the past.
Michael Heckford shows some examples of these techniques and explains how a modern artist uses the technical advances of his own times to help him broaden the scope of his work.
(Previously shown in January 1963)

2.11 Engineering Science: Electrical Instruments
A series designed for technical college students who are taking the General Course in Engineering.
Introduced by Gordon Severn.
(Previously shown in February)

(to 14.36)
BBC One London

For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: 1: Science and Music

Among the multitude of new scientific developments artists are finding many which help them in their work. Today John Borwick discusses with Tristram Cary the use a modern composer makes of electronic equipment to increase his range of sounds and whether he is influenced by modern recording techniques.
For Schools
Previously shown in January 1963
Repeated on Thursday at 11.5 a.m.
(to 11.55)
BBC One London

For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: 2: The Anatomy of Painting

Many modern art galleries have their own laboratories. Here, scientific techniques are used to probe beneath the surface of old paintings and rediscover the methods and materials used by the masters of the past.
Michael Heckford shows some examples of these techniques and explains how a modern artist uses the technical advances of his own times to help him broaden the scope of his work.
For Schools
Previously shown in January 1963
Repeated on Thursday at 11.5 a.m.
(to 11.55)
BBC One London

For Sixth Forms: Science Serves the Arts: 3: Translation by Machine

Modern communications are turning the world into a Tower of Babel, and yet few people speak more than one language. Donald Booth describes how science is trying to help not only the translator but those research workers who are engaged in analysing great writings of the past.
For Schools
Previously shown in January 1963
Repeated on Thursday at 11.5 a.m.
(to 11.55)






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

About this project

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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