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Viewing entries 1 to 9 of 9.
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BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

6.30 English in Action
10: Attitudes and Questions
BILL MITTINS. Senior Lecturer in Education. University of Newcastle, looks at some current attitudes to language, and answers listeners' questions With ANDREW WILKINSON , LEE DAVIDSON and STANLEY ELLIS Producer ALAN WILDING
(Starting next week: The Horror Story)
7.0 Regency People
IAN GRIMBLE explores the meaning of tire Regency Age through studies of ten notable people who lived in it.
10: Sir Stamford Raffles Producer PEGGY BACON
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story (New series) 1: Gothic Tales
CHRISTOPHER LEE and ALEX HAMILTON talk with psychologist DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about the origins and attraction of gruesome tales set in gothic castles and about the two best-known gothic characters: Frankenstein's creature and Count Dracula.
Gothic horror continued into this century, as illustrated by H. P. Lovecroft 's short story The Gable Window, read by EDWARD BISHOP.
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story
2: Ghosts. ' 'I know ghosts don't exist, but I would find it extremely difficult to spend a night in a haunted room.'
JONATHAN MILLER talks with DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS and explains why ghosts are frightening and how storywriters succeed in making them horrific.
M. R. James , cleric and late Provost of Eton College, wrote some of the best ghost stories. Lost Hearts, written in 1910. is read by BERNARD CRIBBINS
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL (A Ghost Story for Christmas: tomorrow, 11.5 pm. BBC1 - see page 21)
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story 3: Psychohorror
Robert Louis Stevenson 's story Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was the first classic of psychohorror.
A modern writer, J. G. BALLARD , talks with DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about the development of psychohorror and about his own explorations of terror within the mind. His short story The Gioconda of the Twilight Noon is read by HUGH DICKSON
Producer ROBIN BRlGHTWELL
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story 4: Shock
Rudyard Kipling 's horror stories of the unknown Orient and Roald Dahl 's modern horror stories shock the reader by suddenly injecting unexpected and terrifying events into a complacent and predictable world.
ALEX HAMILTON talks With DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about this subtle form of horror fiction: his own story The Attic Express is read by RONALD HERDMAN
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL
(Starting 6.30 Un
Paso mis; 7.0 The Genes in Your Lifel
(Publications: page 60)
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

6.40 The Horror Story 1: Gothic Tales
CHRISTOPHER LEE and ALEX HAMILTON talk with psychologist DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about gruesome tales and two gothic characters: Frankenstein's creature and Count Dracula.
20th-century Gothic is illustrated by H. P. Lovecraft 's story The Gable Window, read by EDWARD BISHOP
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story 2: Ghosts
JONATHAN MILLER talks With DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS and explains why ghosts are frightening and how story writers succeed in making fictional ghosts horrific.
Lost Hearts by M. R. JAMES is read by BERNARD CRIBBINS
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

f medium wave)
The Horror Story 3: Psychohorror
J. G. BALLARD talks with DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about the development of psychohorror and about his own explorations of terror within the mind. His short story The Gioconda of the Twilight Noon is read by HUGH DICKSON
Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL
BBC Radio 3

Study on 3

The Horror Story
4: Shock. Rudyard Kipling 's horror stories of the unknown Orient and Roald Dahl 's modern horror stories shock the reader by suddenly injecting unexpected and terrifying events into a complacent and predictable world.
ALEX HAMILTON talks With DR CHRISTOPHER EVANS about this subtle form of horror fiction. His own story The Attic Express is read by RONALD HERDMAN Producer ROBIN BRIGHTWELL ‡






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

About this project

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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