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BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden 7' CivicPride
The profits of the flourishing medieval wool trade brought the perpendicular style of Gothic to fruition in the sumptuous wool churches of East Anglia and the West Country. But while churches were gaining in secular beauty they were losing in spiritual values. The clergy had become comfortable and sometimes corrupt. An anti-clerical feeling grew up amongst the public, and the stage was set for Henry VIII 's break with the Papacy. The Gothic style was faltering, too, as its energy and invention became dissipated. The time had come for a change in architecture as well.
This week DONALD SINDEN visits the churches of Fairford and Cirencester in Gloucestershire.
Film cameraman PAUL v. WHEELER Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
8: The Light of Reason
The Reformation had shattered the religious monopoly of Rome, and in the century of turmoil and persecution that followed, the path of conscience for many ordinary folk led away from both the Church of England and of Rome. This week DONALD SINDEN visits Walpole Chapel in Suffolk, one of our earliest non-conformist churches, whose rugged simplicity reflects the need that was felt for a simple religion unhampered by ritual and superstition. The change in religious life was paralleled in architecture.
In a search for a new order, scholars turned their eyes back to ancient Greece and Rome, which seemed a Golden Age of stability. In the first years of the Restoration, the Great Fire of London destroyed 84 of the city's churches and SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN was afforded the opportunity to rebuild many of them in the then fashionable classical style, well illustrated by St Margaret, Loth-bury and St Stephen , Walbrook.
Film cameraman DAVID FEIG Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

The last of ten programmes with Donald Sinden Hope and Glory
The 19th century shook the Church of England out of its easy-going mould. The grimy suburbs of the Industrial Revolution were fast becoming strongholds of nonconformism or, worse still, atheism. In these areas, new churches were hurriedly built to stem the rising tide of dissent. This week, donald sinden visits St Mark's, Worsley, near Manchester, and All Souls', Haley Hill , Halifax. Both churches were built in the revived Gothic style which had ousted the classical style and had come to be seen as the only true Christian form of architecture. Both were also the work of Sir George Gilbert Scott , perhaps the most typical architect of the Gothic Revival, and certainly the most prolific.
Film cameraman KENNETH LOWE Film editor SUE CHAMBERS Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
2: After the Conquest
The decisive events of 1066 turned the trickle of continental influence, already felt at the court of Edward the Confessor, into a flood. In the decades that followed, the majority of our parish churches were established or rebuilt. The Normans thought big, and the use of the feudal system to deploy manpower and materials when and where needed, enabled them to achieve their ambitions. DONALD SINDEN visits the parish churches of Melbourne, Stewkley and Kilpeck.
Film cameraman KENNETH LOWE Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Newseries Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
1: Through a Glass Darkly
There are over 16,000 parish churches in England. Each of them is unique, a product of its own particular history, but each shares in the tide of events that shaped this country and its people. The conversion of Anglo-
Saxon Britain to Christianity brought a fusion of the vigour of the Pagan world with the classical tradition of Ancient Rome - a fusion from which the ways of thinking of the medieval world were to emerge.
This week DONALD SINDEN visits the churches of St Bartholomew the Great. Smithfield, London, and St Lawrence, Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire.
Film cameramen EUGENE CARR and KENNETH LOWE
Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
1: Through a Glass Darkly
There are over 16,000 parish churches in England. Each of them is unique, a product of its own particular history, but each shares in the tide of events that shaped this country and its people. The conversion of Anglo-Saxon Britain to Christianity brought a fusion of the vigour of the pagan world with the classical tradition of Ancient Rome - a fusion from which the ways of thinking of the medieval mind were to emerge. This week DONALD SINDEN visits the churches of St Bartholomew the Great, Smith-field, London, and St Lawrence, Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire.
Producer DICK FOSTER
Book (same title) £12.00, from bookshops
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
2 : After the Conquest
In the decades that followed the events of 1066 the majority of our parish churches were established or rebuilt. The Normans thought big, and the use of the feudal system to deploy manpower and materials when and where needed, enabled them to achieve their ambitions. DONALD SINDEN visits the parish churches of Melbourne, Stewkley and Kilpeck.
Producer DICK FOSTER (First shown, BBC2)
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

The last of ten programmes with Donald Sinden Hope and Glory
The 19th century shook the Church of England out of its easy-going mould. The grimy suburbs of the Industrial Revolution were fast becoming strongholds of non-conformism or, worse still, atheism. In these areas new churches were hurriedly built to stem the rising tide of dissent. This week DONALD SINDEN visits St Mark 's, Worsley near Manchester, and All Souls', Haley Hill, Halifax. Both churches were built in the revived Gothic style which had ousted the classical style and had come to be seen as the only true Christian form of architecture. Both were also the work of Sir George Gilbert Scott , perhaps the most typical architect of the Gothic Revival.
Film editor SUE CHAMBERS Producer DICK FOSTER
Book (same titte), £12.00, from bookshops
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches: 4: The Church Builders

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
By the 14th century the Gothic style of architecture was well established and the skill of the masons so respected that God himself could be portrayed as the divine architect of the universe, holding the world in his compasses.
This week Donald Sinden looks at the men who built our parish churches and visits St Patrick's Church, Patrington, Humberside, one of the country's most perfect examples of the decorated phase of Gothic architecture.
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
3: The Dawn of Gothic
During the 12th century a complete break was made with Romanesque architecture and Europe moved towards an architectural style of her very own. The new style differed so much from the classical tradition that centuries later Sir Christopher Wren could refer to it disdainfully as Gothic, meaning ' barbarian Though ' barbarian ' in origin, the Gothic style was to set architecture on a journey of some 300 years, in which time the religious beliefs and determined ingenuity of the medieval mind found eloquent expression in the grandest, most sublime churches to be seen in Christendom.
This week DONALD SINDEN visits Rievaulx Abbey and St Giles , Skelton, near York, to look at the early development of Gothic architecture.
Film cameraman PETER HALL Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden 7: Civic Pride
Churches built on the profits of the flourishing medieval wool trade brought the Perpendicular style to fruition. But the new prosperity also brought conflict between Church and State, and the stage became set for Henry VIII 's break with Rome. Donald Sinden visits Fairford and Cirencester.
Producer DICK FOSTER (First shown, BBC2)
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
4: The Church Builders
In medieval times the skill of the mason was so respected that God himself could be portrayed as the divine Architect of the Universe. This week DONALD SINDEN looks at the men who built our parish churches and visits St Patrick's Church, Patrington, Humberside.
Producer DICK FOSTER
Book (same title), £12.00, from bookshops
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
3: The Dawn of Gothic
During the 12th century a complete break was made with Romanesque architecture and Europe moved towards an architectural style of her very own. The Gothic style was to set architecture on a journey of some 300 years, in which time the religious beliefs and determined ingenuity of the medieval mind found eloquent expression in the grandest, most sublime churches in Christendom. DONALD SINDEN visits Rievaulx Abbey and St Giles , Skelton, near York.
Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
5: God spede the plow....
'... and send us ale corn enow' reads the inscription on the surviving fragment of the medieval plough screen at Cawston Church in Norfolk. St Agnes was the patron saint of the local plough guild and now lends her name to the church. This week DONALD SINDEN looks at how the parish church brought together the religious life and working life of ordinary folk. Cawston Church was built in the final period of Gothic architecture - the perpendicular, when the craft of the master carpenter reached a peak - and its woodwork is among the most spectacular in the country.
Film cameraman EUGENE CARR Film editor PETER ORTON. Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden 6: In Memoriam
Wandering among the monuments inside and outside a church affords a fascinating glimpse of how people felt about death and the changing tastes and fashions of 300 years or more. This week DONALD srNDEN visits the church-yard at Painswick in Gloucestershire, which has a unique collection of Renaissance and Baroque tombs, and Bottesford Church in Leicestershire, the only parish church in the country where the monuments of eight successive earls can be seen under one roof.
Film cameraman KENNETH LOWE Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC Two England

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
9: Squire and Parson
In the 17th and 18th centuries links between the Manor and the Church were strong. At Cottes- brooke in Northamptonshire, All Saints Church was fitted out with boxpews, three-decker pulpit and a private family pew for the squire. The interior here neatly delineates the social hierarchy of the village and provides a perfect picture of a country Sunday. The squire's authority was virtually absolute, and, in this the age of the amateur architect, his influence on the design of the parish church was growing too. At Little Stanmore in Middlesex, the Duke of Chandos demolished all but the tower of the church of St Lawrence and rebuilt it in the latest classical style. He commissioned the best artists he could afford to create a treasure house of a church that reflects not the corporate pride of the parish, but the wealth and status of one man.
Film cameraman KENNETH LOwa Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
5: God spede the plow ...
... and send us ale corn enow' reads the inscription on the surviving fragment of the medieval plough screen at Cawstori Church in Norfolk. St Agnes was the patron saint of the local plough guild and now lends her name to the church. This week DONALD SINDEN looks at how the parish church brought together the religious life and working life of ordinary folk. Cawston Church was built in the final period of Gothic architecture -the Perpendicular, when the craft of the master carpenter reached a peak - and its woodwork is among the most spectacular in the country.
Producer DICK FOSTER
Book (same title), £12.00, from bookshops
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden 6: In Memoriam
The monuments of a church afford a fascinating glimpse of how people felt about death and the changing tastes and fashions. This week DONALD SINDEN visits the churchyard at Painswick in Gloucestershire, which has a unique collection of renaissance and baroque tombs, and Bottesford church in Leicestershire, the only parish church in the country where the monuments of eight successive earls can be seen under one roof.
Producer DICK FOSTER
BBC One London

Discovering English Churches

A series of ten programmes with Donald Sinden
9: Squire and Parson
In the 17th and 18th centuries links between the manor and the church were strong. At Cottesbrooke in Northamptonshire, All Saints Church was fitted out with boxpews, three-decker pulpit and a private family pew for the squire. The interior here neatly delineates the social hierarchy of the village and provides a perfect picture of a country Sunday. The squire's authority was virtually absolute, and, in this, the age of the amateur architect, his influence on the design of the parish church was growing too. At Little Stanmore in Middlesex, the Duke of Chandos demolished all but the tower of the church of St Lawrence and rebuilt it in the latest classical style. He commissioned the best artists he could afford to create a treasure house of a church that reflects not the corporate pride of the parish, but the wealth and status of one man.
Film editor PETER ORTON Producer DICK FOSTER
Book (same title), £12.00 from bookshops
National Programme Daventry

' Pillars of the English Church'

Scribes-I
Jeremy Taylor
By the Rev. Canon
A. C. DEANE , M.A.
IN THE FIRST of four talks on men of letters famous in the Church of England, Canon Deane, Canon of St. George's, Windsor, discusses Jeremy Taylor. It was said by Taylor's friend, George Rust : ' This great prelate had the good humour of a gentleman, the eloquence of an orator, the fancy of a poet, the acuteness of a schoolman, the profound-ness of a philosopher, the wisdom of a chancellor, the reason of an angel, and the piety of a saint ' ; and whatever allowance be made for friendship, it seems to have been the general opinion of his contemporaries that he was a man of great personal charm.
Archbishop Laud may be said to have discovered him. Befriended by Charles I, he returned royal favours with a passionate loyalty at the risk of his'life. Chaplain to the king during the Civil War, he was captured at Cardigan in 1645. He returned to Golden Grove, Carmarthenshire, and there for ten
years devoted himself to theology, writing the works for which he is best known, but his loyalty, shown in a preface, incurred his imprisonment in Chepstow Castle in 1655. He lost two of his sons, and, coming to London, actively espoused the Royalist cause, this time being incarcerated in the Tower. Asylum was found for him at Lisburn, in Ireland, until the Restoration. Charles 11 appointed him Bishop of Down and Connor, and, later, of Dromore. He died at Lisburn in 1667. His style in writing has been compared to Milton's and won the eulogies of Coleridge.






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