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The new BBC Programme Explorer has 3 playable programmes that match your search for "Ray Mears World of Survival".

BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival: The Arctic

Tracks presenter Ray Mears makes himself at home in six of the most inhospitable places on earth and discovers how the indigenous people have survived.
Mears takes on the Arctic, which is twice as cold as the average freezer, and learns survival techniques from the Inuit. See today's choices.
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival: Heart of the Rift

In a six-part series Ray Mears explores some of the world's most inhospitable areas.
The Hadza, one of the original tribes of hunter-gatherers, live on the eastern shore of Lake Eyasi in Tanzania. See today's choices.
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's Extreme Survival

Survival expert Ray Mears travels to half a dozen of the world's most inhospitable places to show how, given the correct instruction, people can confront and overcome the most extreme conditions. His first assignment sees him facing the heat, snakes, spiders and mosquitos of the jungles of south-west Costa Rica. See Choice.
(S) (W) Surviving when hope runs dry: page 25
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Knowledge

Science: Ray Mears' World of Survival

The Coromandel Coast: wilderness expert Ray Mears braves lethal rip tides on a log raft and learns various methods of catching fish (S)
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Examining some of the world's most inhospitable areas.
The Land of Genghis Khan
The extreme climate of the Mongolian Steppes makes it a hostile environment. RayMears finds out how its nomads move their livestock up to 15 times a year, timing theirjourneys with the seasonal growth of pasture. See today's choices.
Director Andrew Graham-Brown ; Series producer Annette Martin Subtitled. ♦ The art of staying alive: page 34
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's Extreme Survival

Ray Mears continues his travels to inhospitable places. Military. RAF crews can find themselves in action almost anywhere in the world, and, if they are shot down behind enemy lines, their survival may depend on detailed knowledge of how to survive in environmental extremes - including desert, jungle, forest, the Arctic or even at sea.
Mears joins 20 airmen and women as they undergo the RAF's survival training course. He spends a week living rough in shelters on Dartmoor, where he traps squirrels and birds, lights fires and cooks what he catches. Adding to the discomfort, the group are then sent out on the run for three days and nights with a hunting party on their trail.
(S) (W)
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival: The Barren Lands

The migration of a million caribou annually across the landscape of Labrador in Canada is one of the greatest wonders of the natural world.
In one of the least populated places on earth, survival expert Ray Mears joins the Innu at their winter hunting camps, and follows one of the amazing transformations of caribou skin into buckskin by using the brains of the animal to tan the hide.
(Digital widescreen)
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Tracks presenter Ray Mears demonstrates how to survive in some of the most inhospitable places on earth. Arnhem Land. Mears visits a region in northern Australia that has average temperatures of 30°C all year and unbearable humidity. The Aborigines who live there share survival skills with him, including how to avoid crocodiles. Director Joe Ahearne ; Producer Kathryn Moore
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's Extreme Survival

Arnhem Land. Ray Mears ranks Arnhem Land in the far north of Australia as the most inhospitable place he has visited - a land of man-eating crocodiles, venomous spiders and many of the world's most deadly snakes. Mears tells the story of how three airmen overcame starvation, thirst, crocodiles, sharks and appalling tropical ulcers after crash-landing in one of the region's swamps.
Director/Producer Andrew Graham-Brown Ray Mears 's Country Tracks is on Friday at 9.50pm
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Namibia. In the last of the series, Ray Mears visits the sweltering Kalahari bush to learn survival skills from the Jo'hansi bushmen. Though they live in temperatures of over 40°C and the land is parched, they are among the most skilled huntergatherers. The programme returns later in the year.
Director Ben Warwick ; Producer Kathryn Moore Repeat Stereo
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

In a compilation of two programmes from the series, Ray Mears explores survival techniques used by the native peoples of the Indonesian Spice Islands and Western Samoa in the Pacific Ocean.
(Revised rpt) (S)
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Savaii. The island of Savaii in Western
Samoa looks like paradise, but it is remote, prone to cyclones and surrounded by treacherous seas. Ray Mears spends ten days learning the local survival skills. Director Joe Ahearne ; Series producer Kathryn Moore
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Arnhem Land. Ray Mears visits a region in Australia's Northern Territory that has searing temperatures all year round and unbearable levels of humidity. The Aborigines who live there share survival skills with him, including how to avoid crocodiles. Director Joe Ahearne ; Producer Kathryn Moore Repeat Stereo Subtitled .....
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Savaii. The island of Savaii in Western Samoa looks like a paradise but it is remote, prone to cyclones and surrounded by treacherous seas. Ray Mears spends ten days tryingto absorb the local survival skills.
Director Joe Ahearne ; Producer Kathryn Moore Repeat Stereo Subtitled ...........
BBC Two England

Ray Mears's World of Survival

Ray Mears explores some of the world's most inhospitable terrain in a five-part series.
The Arctic. In the cruelly cold
Arctic, Mears has to master the skills of igloo-building and navigating in a whiteout. Producer Kathryn Moore
Repeat Stereo






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