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BBC Television

Eye on Research: 3: Cold Crystal

Raymond Baxter reports.
The story of the M.A.S.E.R. Micro-wave Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation.
Tonight's Eye on Research shows one of the most important developments on the frontiers of physics. Outside Broadcast and film cameras visit scientists who are making crystals and using them to amplify the whispers of radio noise from outer space.
From The Clarendon Laboratory Oxford; The Royal Radar Establishment Malvern;
The Office of Naval Research Washington, D.C.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 1: Food for Thought

Raymond Baxter reports.
Rats-monkeys-chaffinches ants-locusts: In this first programme of a new "Eye on Research" series Outside Broadcast cameras show how experimental psychologists study animal behaviour - a study that might ultimately affect the design of computers and throw some light on the working of the human brain.
From the Psychological Laboratory, Cambridge University; Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University; Department of Psychology, Reading University
See page 4
BBC Television

Eye on Research: The Royal Society Tercentenary Year: 2: The Sniffle Group

A series on the current work of Fellows of the Royal Society.
With Dr. C.H. Andrewes, F.R.S.
Last year fifty times more working days were lost due to the common cold than to industrial strikes. After thirteen years of intensive research, scientists led by Dr. Andrewes have recently isolated some of the viruses responsible.
Outside broadcast cameras visit the National Institute for Medical Research at Mill Hill to report their progress on research into the 'flu and common cold viruses.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 3: Another Child's Poison

Raymond Baxter reports.
Medical research has recently uncovered a new approach to the cause and cure of one form of mental deficiency. It has been found that certain types of mental backwardness may be due to the eating of normal foods, which some children are unable to break down in the ordinary way.
Outside Broadcast and film cameras visit scientists engaged on research into one of these diseases, known as Phenylketonuria.
From the Metabolic Unit, Little Bromwich General Hospital, Birmingham and Exeter City Hospital.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 7: Point of View?

Robert Reid reports.
A visit to the Applied Psychology Research Unit of the Medical Research Council, where Dr. Mackworth of the Unit, and Brian Shackel, a research psychologist of a large electronics group, show their two ways of coping with the problems of eye movement.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 1: Smaller than Life

Raymond Baxter reports.
Outside broadcast and film cameras visit some of the scientists engaged in virological research, who tell the story of the Virus-what it is-what it looks like-and how it multiplies.
From the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge:
Dr. Roy Markham, Agricultural Research Council, Molteno Institute
Dr. Sydney Brenner, Medical Research Council, Molecular Biology Unit
Roger Home, Department of Electron Microscopy, The Cavendish Laboratory
From the National Institute for Medical Research. Mill Hill, London:
Dr. Alick Isaacs
Dr. Derek Burke
From the Max Planck Institute Tubingen, Germany:
Dr. Gerhard Schramm, Dr. Werner Schiiffer
From the Hall of Science at the Brussels Exhibition:
Dr. Aaron Klug, Birkbeck College, London
See page 6
BBC Television

Eye on Research: The Royal Society Tercentenary Year: 5: Shapes of Life

A series on the current work of Fellows of the Royal Society with Dr. M. F. Perutz, F.R.S. and Dr. J. C. Kendrew, F.R.S. with a filmed contribution by Professor J. D. Bernal F.R.S.
Proteins control the activity of every living cell. Knowing how they are made will help us to understand how they work. Now, after more than twenty years of intensive research, the structures of two proteins have been worked out for the very first time.
Outside Broadcast cameras visit the Medical Research Council Unit for Molecular Biology in the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, to meet the two scientists responsible for this, one of the greatest British scientific achievements of the century.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 5: The Six Parameters of PAT

A machine that talks... the story of the collaboration between electronics engineers and phoneticians in the development of a new research tool in the study of speech with Walter Lawrence, Signals Research Development Establishment, Christchurch;
David Abercrombie, Reader in Phonetics, Edinburgh University and members of his Department.
See page 7
BBC Television

Eye on Research: The Six Parameters of P.A.T.

A machine that talks ... the story of the collaboration between electronics engineers and phoneticians in the development of a new research tool in the study of speech with Walter Lawrence, Signals Research Development Establishment, Christchurch;
David Abercrombie Reader in Phonetics, Edinburgh University and members of his Department.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: Another Child's Poison

Raymond Baxter reports.

One baby in every 20,000 is born unable to develop mentally on a normal diet. The child is unable to digest a chemical substance present in all protein foods, and as a result the brain becomes poisoned and the child's intelligence deteriorates rapidly during the first few months of life.
Outside Broadcast cameras in the Metabolic Unit of the Little Bromwich General Hospital in Birmingham, and film cameras at the Exeter City Hospital, show some of the research going on into this disease known as Phenylketonuria.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 5: Trial by Water

Robert Reid reports.
Scientists of the Hydraulic Research Station at Wallingford show how models are used to plot the action of water on the coastlines and river beds of the world.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: Trial by Water

Robert Reid reports.

Scientists of the Hydraulic Research Station at Wallingford show how models are used to plot the action of water on the coastlines and river beds of the world.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 2: Another World

Raymond Baxter reports.
Scientists of the Freshwater Biological Association are investigating life beneath the surface of Windermere. Since the ice melted 12,000 years ago, the fish in the lake and the animals and plants they eat have been gradually changing. Outside Broadcast cameras at Windermere show how research workers in a laboratory on the shore are trying to find out how the millions of fish live together in a world of their own.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: The Royal Society Tercentenary Year: 4: The Hidden Stream

A series on the current work of Fellows of the Royal Society
With Professor J. McMichael, F.R.S.
The hidden stream of blood which flows through the heart and lungs can usually only be studied indirectly. Recent research at the Postgraduate Medical School of London has produced some astonishing and unique devices for diagnosing heart and lung diseases.
Outside broadcast cameras visit the Postgraduate Medical School at Hammersmith Hospital to 'see' some of these tools and to meet the doctors using them.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: The Royal Society Tercentenary Year: 6: The Living Batteries

A series on the current work of Fellows of the Royal Society
by H. W. Lissman, F.B.S. and R. D. Keynes, F.R.S.
Some fish generate extraordinarily high electrical voltages to stun their prey; others find their way about by emitting extremely weak electrical impulses. How they do this has intrigued scientists for more than two hundred years.
Outside Broadcast cameras visit the Department of Zoology at Cambridge to investigate the research of two scientists who are near the final answer.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 3: Adapt to Export

Robert Reid reports.
Dr. A. Fogg and John Giles of the Motor Industry Research Association show how British vehicles are developed to compete in the world's export markets.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 10: The Thread of Life D.N.A. (Deoxyribo-nucleic acid)

Robert Reid reports.
The story of how physicists, chemists, and biologists have combined forces to produce the biggest biological break-through in the last fifty years-the discovery of the chemical believed to be the basis of heredity.
As told by some of those who have taken part in the research with the help of outside broadcasts and film.
From Cambridge, Dr. Daniel Brown and Dr. Vernon Ingram
From New York, Dr. L.D. Hamilton
From London, Dr. Maurice Wilkins
From Paris, Dr. Harriett Ephrussi-Taylor
In the London studio: Professor Sir Alexander Todd
Programme linking by Professor C.H. Waddington
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 4: The Friendly Enemy?

Raymond Baxter reports.
The healthy tissues of plants and animals alone are free from the presence of bacteria, and the control of bacteria is one of the permanent problems of science
Tonight outside broadcast and film cameras visit South Wales where, by Gamma radiation and other methods, some significant results are being achieved in bacteriological research.
From University College, Cardiff
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 2: Up in the Clouds

Raymond Baxter reports.
Some of the latest research into the formation of rain, ice, and snow, is explained by Dr. B. J. Mason of the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London.
BBC Television

Eye on Research: 6: The Solid State

Robert Reid reports.
A visit to the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell to see how the metallurgist handles materials in this atomic age.






About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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