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Listings

: The Cunning Little Vixen

See foot of page and page 55
ACT 1
Scene 1: The forest: summer
Scene 2: The yard of the Forester's cottage: autumn

: WHY DID MACHIAVELLI WRITE THE PRINCE?

by John Hale of Jesus College, Oxford
A new translation of Machiavelli's The Prince was published last month.

: The Cunning Little Vixen

Act 2
Scene 1: The forest: autumn
Scene 2: The village inn
Scene 3: The forest: summer

: Space, Time and Terror

by Robert Conquest
Mr. Conquest suggests that science-fiction mav be meeting a deficiency which has weakened Western literature for the last 200 years, the need for a tradition of novels concerned mainly with ideas rather than characters. His thoughts are prompted by Kingsley Amis's recent survey New Maps of Hell.

: THE CUNNING LITTLE VIXEN

Act 3
Scene 1: The forest: the following spring Scene 2: The village inn
Scene 3: The forest: spring

: The Overcoat

by Nicolai Gogol
A radio play by Joan Littlewood based on the translation by Constance Garnett with round and music by Roberto Gerhard
Clerks in a Government Office:
Singer, Owen Brannigan
Produced by CHARLES LEFEAUX

Contributors

Play By: Joan Littlewood
Translation By: Constance Garnett
Music By: Roberto Gerhard
Singer: Owen Brannigan
Produced By: Charles Lefeaux
A Ghost: Peter Claughton
Akaky Akakvevich Bashmachkin: Richard Hurndall
Alixis: Haydn Jows
Yeroshkin: Tom Watson
Dmitry: Kenneth Dight
Fed'yor: John Bryning
Maria Ivanovna, a landlady: Gladys Young
Petrovich, a tailor: Frank Windsor
An Official: Keith Williams
A Young Lady: Jane Corbould
A Person of Consequence: Julian Somers

: CHABRIER

Dix pieces pittoresques played by Angus Morrison (piano)

Contributors

Piano: Angus Morrison








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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