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: ENGLISH CHAMBER MUSIC

of the eighteenth century
London Harpsichord Ensemble:
John Francis (flute) Albert Chasey (violin) Suzanne Rozsa (violin)
Ambrose Gauntlett (cello)
Millicent Silver (harpsiehord)
Fourth of a series of programmes of 18thcentury English chamber music devised and edited by Stanley Sadie

Contributors

Flute: John Francis
Violin: Albert Chasey
Violin: Suzanne Rozsa
Cello: Ambrose Gauntlett
Harpsiehord: Millicent Silver
Edited By: Stanley Sadie

: THE ECONOMIC RACE WITH COMMUNISM

Peter Wiles
Fellow of New College, Oxford speaks about the success of Soviet manufacturing industry
(Shortened version of a paper read at the Congress for Cultural Freedom which took place in Milan in September)

: Eugene Onegin

A lyric opera in three acts
Words adapted from the poem of Alexander Pushkin by Tchaikovsky Shilovsky and C.S. Shilovsky
Music by Tchaikovsky
English translation by Edward J. Dent
Cost in order of singing:
Peasants, guests, officers, etc.
Sadler's Wells Chorus
(Chorus-Master, Marcus Dods)
Sadler's Wells Orchestra
(Leader, Walter Price )
CONDUCTED by ALEXANDER GIBBON
From Sadler's Wells Theatre, London (by arrangement with Sadler's Wells Trust Ltd.)
The action takes place in Russia about 1820
ACT 1
Scene 1. Mme. Larina's garden. Autumn.
Scene 2. Tatiana's bedroom. The same night.
Scene 3. Another part of the garden. The next day.

Contributors

Unknown: Tchaikovsky Shilovsky
Unknown: C.S. Shilovsky
Translation By: Edward J. Dent
Chorus-Master: Marcus Dods
Leader: Walter Price
Conducted By: Alexander Gibbon
Daughters of Madame Larina: Tatiana: Patricia Howard
Daughters of Madame Larina: Olga: Joyce Blackham
Madame Larina, widow of a country gentleman: Anna Pollak
The nurse: Olwen Price
Vladimir Lensky, a young pret,betrothed to Olga: Rowland Jones
Eugene Onegin: Frederick Sharp
Monsieur Triquet: Gwent Lewis
Captain Saretsky: John Probyn
Prince Gremin a retired general: Harold Blackburn

: 'EUGENE ONEGIN'

Act 2
Scene 1. Mme. Larina's drawing-room.
Winter.
Scene 2. The river bank. Early the following morning.

: 'EUGENE ONEGIN'

Act 3
Scene 1. Ballroom in a fashionable house in St. Petersburg. Some years later.
Scene 2. Prince Gremin's house. Next day.

: THE FATE OF THE SOUL IN A PRIMITIVE SOCIETY

by Raymond Firth
Professor of Anthropology
In the University of London
The first of two talks based on the Frazer Lecture delivered this year by Professor Firth before the University of Cambridge. This lecture in honour of Sir Jnmes Frazer is given annually at various university centres.
In this talk Professor Firth examines some of the ideas of a primitive Polynesian people, the Tikopia, about life after death.

Contributors

Unknown: Raymond Firth

: THE POETRY OF MONTALE

A selection of his poems read In Italian and in translation
Chosen and introduced by Luigi Meneghello
Translations by Arthur Boyars and Edwin Morgan
Readers:
Anthony Jacobs , Paul Colacicchl

Contributors

Introduced By: Luigi Meneghello
Unknown: Arthur Boyars
Readers: Edwin Morgan
Readers: Anthony Jacobs
Readers: Paul Colacicchl

: CLEMENTI

Sonata in B minor. Op. 40 No. 2 pla-ed by Artur Balsam (piano) on gramophone records

Contributors

Piano: Artur Balsam

: FOREIGN REVIEW

A monthly report








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

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