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Listings

: SOME ANCIENT GREEK FESTIVALS

Talk by W. K. C. Guthrie
Reader in Classics and Public Orator in the University of Cambridge

: THE LADY MARGARET SINGERS

Conductor, George Guest

Contributors

Conductor: George Guest

: THE NATURE OF SCIENTIFIC THEORY

Do Scientists
Use Scientific Method?
First of four talks by Stepher Toulmin
Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science in the University of Oxford
'As a scientist put it recently: " It's very nice when philosophers congratulate me on what I'm doing; the pity is I never recognise their description of it." ' Stephen Toulmin examines the contrast between the accounts of science and scientific method given in books on logic and philosophy, and the activities and arguments of working scientists.

Contributors

Unknown: Stepher Toulmin

: BEETHOVEN

Sonata in A, Op. 2 No. 2 Sonata in A. Op. 101 played by Claudio Arrau (piano)
Second of sixteen recitals during which Claudio Arrau is playing all Beethoven's piano sonatas and the Diabelli Variations

Contributors

Piano: Claudio Arrau

: PERSONAL ANTHOLOGY

C. Day Lewis chooses and introduces a number of poems
Read by Jill Balcon

Contributors

Read By: Jill Balcon

: A CONCERT

The Harvey Phillips
String Orchestra
(Leader. Hugh Bean )
Conductor, Harvey Phillips
' The Cearne ' (pronounced Serne) is the name of Harvey Phillips' home in Kent. Gordon Jacob wrote the Sinfonietta specially for this orchestra (which performed it for the first time two years ago) and dedicated it to Harvey Phillips and his wife, Pamela Harrison. It is in three movements: the first is quick and vigorous, the second slow and reflective, and the last begins energetically but ends on a quiet note, recalling some of the themes from the other two movements.
D.C.

Contributors

Unknown: Harvey Phillips
Leader: Hugh Bean
Conductor: Harvey Phillips

: 'DON ROBERTO'

Compton Mackenzie recalls the many-sided personality of his friend R. B. Cunninghame Graham, who was born a hundred years ago

Contributors

Unknown: Compton MacKenzie

: MOZART and GINASTERA

The Koeckert Quartet:
Rudolf Koeckert (violin)
Willi Buchner (violin)
Oskar Riedl (viola) Josef Merz (cello)

Contributors

Violin: Rudolf Koeckert
Violin: Willi Buchner
Viola: Oskar Riedl
Cello: Josef Merz








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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