Programme Index

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Eileen McLoughlin (soprano)
Nancy Thomas (mezzo-soprano)
Maude Baker (contralto)
Instrumental Ensemble
BBC Chorus
Conductor, Leslie Woodgate
Viola Tunnard and Martin Penny
(piano duet)
Reginald Smith Brindle is an English composer who has studied mainly in Italy; he now belongs to the Florentine dodecaphonic group. His setting of Psalm 137, one of his last tonal works, dates from 1951.
Raymond Hocklev, who comes from
Sheffield, studied at the R.A.M. with William Alwyn. His Divertimento (1954) is in six movements.
The Soul's Progress is a sequence of four sacred pieces; the poems, by George Crabbe , Thomas Campian , Sir Thomas Browne , and Francis Quarles , are concerned with the promise of immortality.

Contributors

Soprano:
Eileen McLoughlin
Mezzo-Soprano:
Nancy Thomas
Contralto:
Maude Baker
Conductor:
Leslie Woodgate
Conductor:
Viola Tunnard
Unknown:
Martin Penny
Unknown:
George Crabbe
Unknown:
Thomas Campian
Unknown:
Sir Thomas Browne
Unknown:
Francis Quarles

by Gerald Sykes
A group of three talks in which Gerald Svkes describes some of the psychological effects of industrialisation. based on the evidence of his own country, the United States of America
2-Technology and Love
In this talk the speaker compares the psychology of Freud with that of Jung, and suggests that an understanding of both is necessary in the present age when technology has made its impact on our attitude towards love and morals.

Contributors

Unknown:
Gerald Sykes
Unknown:
Gerald Svkes

Talk by John Mavrogordato
Reader, Colin Golby
The Afterlife depicted in modern Greek folk songs is set in the gloomy underworld of Homer: good and bad alike can expect only a shadowy survival after death, and there is no trace of the rewards and punishments of a Christian Heaven and Hell. Professor Mavrogordato illustrates this pagan survival with his own translations of Greek folk songs.

Contributors

Talk By:
John Mavrogordato
Reader:
Colin Golby

Third Programme

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More