Programme Index

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The Peasant Cantata :
Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet
Ena Mitchell (soprano)
Richard Standen (base)
London Harpsichord Ensemble:
John Francis (flutie) David Burditt (horn)
Mamoug Parikiain (violin)
Hans Gedger (violin)
Neville Marrineir (violin)
Bernard Davie (viola)
Ambrose Gauntlett (ceilo)
Adrian Beers (double-bass)
Millicent Silver (harpsichord)
(Recording of the broadcast on October

Contributors

Soprano:
Richard Standen
Unknown:
John Francis
Horn:
David Burditt
Violin:
Hans Gedger
Violin:
Neville Marrineir
Viola:
Bernard Davie
Viola:
Ambrose Gauntlett

Quintetto Chigiano :
Ricardo Bremgola (violin,) Mario Benvenwti (violin.)
Giovanni Leone (viola)
Lino Filiippini (cello)
Sergio Lorenzi (piano)
Shostakovich's Piano Quintet is his most important chamberwork to date. It was written in 1940, and was awarded the Stalin prize in the following year. The work certainly offers no special difficulties to the listener; form, rhythm, and harmony could hardly be more straightforward and the melodies are for the most part disarmingly unambiguous. Dcryck Cooke

Contributors

Violin:
Ricardo Bremgola
Violin:
Mario Benvenwti
Viola:
Giovanni Leone
Cello:
Lino Filiippini
Piano:
Sergio Lorenzi
Unknown:
Dcryck Cooke

Third of six lectures by Jubian Huxley , F.R.S.
Biological Improvement:
The Second Evolutionary Equation
The theme of this lecture is that Natural Selection, plus adequate time, produces biological improvement. Dr. Huxley gives examples of the different kinds and degrees of biological improvement, and of rhe ways in which improvement is restricted and limited in different evolutionary circumstances. He discusses whether one can properly distinguish between ' higher * and lower ' animals. or speak of ' progress ' in evolution. He concludes that biological progress, though infrequent, is a fact, and in the long run the most important fact of evolution.

Contributors

Unknown:
Jubian Huxley

An illustrated talk. by Rachel Bromiwich
Lecturer in Celtic at Cambridge University
Readers;: Mary O',Farrell and KeLty Macleod
The speaker traces the antiquity of the custom of keening for the dead in Ireland and in Gaelic Scotland. The talk is illustrated by readings from some of the laments, composed at different times and places in both countries, rhat indicate the existence of a common keening tradition.

Contributors

Talk By:
Rachel Bromiwich
Readers:
Mary O',farrell

Third Programme

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More