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Vespers (1610)
Edited by Hans F. Redlich
Margaret Ritchie (soprano) Jennifer Vyvyan (soprano) Eugenia Zareska (contralto)
Richard Lewis (tenor) Max Worthley (tenor)
Robert Irwin (baritone) Owen Brannigan (bass)
Carl and Marie Dolmetsch (recorders) Ambrose Gauntiett (viola da gamba)
Thurston Dart (harpsichord)
Ralph Downes (organ)
Boys of the Schola Polyphonica (Trained by Henry Washington)
BBC Chorus
(Chorus-Master, Leslie Woodgate )
Philharmonia Orchestra
(Leader. Manoug Parikian) Conducted by Walter Goehr
Part 1

Contributors

Edited By:
Hans F. Redlich
Soprano:
Margaret Ritchie
Soprano:
Jennifer Vyvyan
Contralto:
Eugenia Zareska
Tenor:
Richard Lewis
Tenor:
Max Worthley
Baritone:
Robert Irwin
Bass:
Owen Brannigan
Bass:
Carl
Bass:
Marie Dolmetsch
Viola:
Ambrose Gauntiett
Harpsichord:
Thurston Dart
Harpsichord:
Ralph Downes
Chorus-Master:
Leslie Woodgate
Conducted By:
Walter Goehr

A series of eight lectures by the Rev. V. A. Demant , Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral
Theology and Canon of Christ
Church, Oxford
Political Fuiths;
In his fourth lecture Canon Demant examines the political movements that accompany the decline of Capitalism. The move has been towards Collectivism, and its dangers can best be interpreted through a Christian doctrine of man. To ask whether the passing of Capitalism means the passing of the Liberal Idea is in fact a religious question. Political movements have not left the religious sphere untouched; they have attempted to replace it. This has been shown by the way in which they have taken on a sacred form; to challenge them is sacrilege. There has been some confusion of thought in attempts to understand the interplay of these various forces, and Canon Demant assesses one of the central debates: that is, whether the maintenance of liberal truth depends on the free market of Capitalism.

Contributors

Unknown:
Rev. V. A. Demant

Third Programme

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More