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Regional Variations (3)

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Western

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Midland

Act I of Puccini's Opera
' Madam Butterfly'
Cast;
Members of the Chorus and Orchestra of La
Scala Milan
Conductor, CARLO SABAJNO
Chorus Master, VITTORE VENEZIANI
Lieutenant Pinkerton, an officer of the United States Navy, arrives at Nagasaki in the course of his duties. It is here that he meets Cho-Cho-San, known as Madam Butterfly.
Goro is a Japanese marriage broker, to whom
Pinkerton goes to draw up an agreement concerning his forthcoming marriage to Butterfly, for whom he has a passing infatuation. Goro assures him that the marriage is only binding so long as he continues to live with his wife.
In the meantime Madam Butterfly has forsaken her gods to become a Christian and is scorned by her relations, who finally renounce her.
To Pinkerton comes Sharpless, the American
Consul at Nagasaki, who tries to dissuade him from this marriage, and points out that Butterfly is very serious and is under the impression that she is entering a life contract; but Pinkerton does not listen to him, and the marriage takes place and is followed by a feast, where her uncle, the Bonze, finally curses her. The Act ends with mutual protestations of love.

Contributors

Madam Butterfly:
Margaret Sheridan (soprano)
Buzuki:
Ida Mannarini (mezzo-Soprano)
Lieutenant Pinkerton:
Lionello Cecil (tenor)
Sharpless:
Vittorio Weinberg (baritone)
Goro:
Nello Palai (-Tenor)
The Bonze:
Guglielmo Masimi (bass)

Conductors of the World—XIII
ADRIAN BOULT
The B.B.C. Symphony Orchestra: Overture, Der Freischiitz (Weber); Nocturne (A Midsummer Night's Dream) (Mendelssohn) ; Hungarian Dances Nos. 19, 20, and 21 (Brahms) ; Prelude, Tristan and Isolde (Wagner); March, Pomp and Circumstance No. 2 (Elgar).
(Daventry National Programme)

Contributors

Unknown:
Adrian Boult

Regional Variations (3)

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Western

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Midland

sung by VERA SIDDONS (Soprano)
GLADYS PALMER (Contralto)
BARRINGTON HOOPER (Tenor)
GEORGE PIZZEY (Bass) .
Hermann Lohr is a West-country musician, as are many colleagues of his own generation. Ho was born in Plymouth in 1872, and having made a name for writing attractive ballads in the days when ballads did attract, he has retained it to this day. This song cycle is typical of his stylo and is both naive and charming. Such a song cycle as this would have been one of the principal features of the old ballad concert and would have been sung by the pick of English singers.
Sir Walford Davies is never so happy as when he is addressing children of all ages. Childlike though the subject of these Nursery Rhymes may be, the spirit and the craft with which Sir Walford has dealt with them are akin to those which inspired such men beloved by children as, for example, Lewis Carroll.

Contributors

Sung By:
Vera Siddons
Contralto:
Gladys Palmer
Tenor:
Barrington Hooper
Unknown:
Hermann Lohr
Unknown:
Sir Walford Davies
Unknown:
Lewis Carroll.

Regional Variations (3)

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Midland

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Western

Relayed from The Queen's Hall, London
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
STILES-ALLEN (Soprano)
HAROLD SAMUEL (Pianoforte)
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
BEETHOVEN
ORCHESTRA
Overture, Leonora, No. 3
The third Leonora Overture (Beethoven wrote in all four overtures to his opera Fidelio) is so descriptive of the opera as to be as self-contained as a symphonic poem. It begins, after a solemn descending scale passage, with the air sung in the opera by Florestan, the hero. As soon as the tempo quickens, Leonora's melody is heard. Then we are reminded of Florestan in prison, and presently the most dramatic moment of the overture leads up to the trumpet call, which in the opera heralds the arrival of the Governor with an order for the release of Florestan. Twice the trumpet call is heard, and with each call, the prisoner's rising hopes grow stronger ; thereafter the note of exaltation grows and the overture ends in an outburst of triumphant joy.
HAROLD SAMUEL and Orchestra
Concerto No. 2, in B flat
1. Allegro con brio ; 2. Adagio ; 3. Rondo : Molto Allegro
ORCHESTRA
Symphony No. 7, in A
1. Poco sostenuto, Vivace ; 2. Allegretto ; 3. Presto meno assai; 4. Finale: Allegro con brio
The seventh has always been one of the most popular of Beethoven's nine symphonies, a close second to the fifth. Even at its first performance in Vienna in 1813 it was rapturously received, and the second movement was encored-a rare tribute. A long introduction leads up to the main brisk section of the first movement, one of the gayest first movements written by Beethoven; much of the second movement is march-like in rhythm ; the third is in the form of a Scherzo, with a Trio based on an old Austrian pilgrims' song; the last movement is breathless with high spirits.
(Tickets can be obtained from the B.B.C., Broadcasting House, W.1 ; The Queen's Hall, Langham Place, W.1, and usual Agents. Prices (including Entertainments Tax) 78. 6d., 6s., 5s. (Reserved) ; 3s. (Unreserved) ; Promenade (payment at doors only), 2s.)

Contributors

Pianoforte:
Harold Samuel
Conducted By:
Sir Henry Wood
Unknown:
Harold Samuel

Regional Programme London

About Regional Programme

Regional Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More