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Regional Variations (3)

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Northern

'THE MODERN DILEMMA '—XXIV

Regional Programme Midland

Mr. T. S. ELIOT
THIS is the last talk in one of the most
-L successful sections of the ' Changing World ' Symposium. This series of twenty-four Sunday talks may well claim to have fulfilled its original purpose : ' to supply listeners with some anchor-holds in the stress and storm of the forces of transformation affecting them, and to create or re-establish faith.' To this end, besides the important groups of four talks, each given by Mr. Christopher Dawson , Professor John Macmurray , and Mr. T. S. Eliot , individual contributions have boon made by distinguished churchmen, such as the Rev. F. R. Barry and the Rev. Nathaniel Micklem , and such representative laymen and women as Mr. W. H. Jones , Dr. Harry Roberts , the well-known author, Miss Evelyn Underhill , an authority on mysticism, and Mr. Gerald Heard , whose scientific talks are a regular feature of the programmes. Mr. T. S. Eliot , who gives his fourth talk today, is in the first rank of modern poets and literary critics, and is Editor of The Criterion. His poetry has always been deeply concerned with the modern age : it was claimed for The Waste Land when it appeared ten years ago that it expressed the plight of the whole postwar generation. Mr. Eliot is deeply interested in religious problems, as his last book of verse, ' Ash Wednesday,' showed.

Contributors

Unknown:
Mr. T. S. Eliot
Unknown:
Mr. Christopher Dawson
Unknown:
John MacMurray
Unknown:
Mr. T. S. Eliot
Unknown:
Rev. F. R. Barry
Unknown:
Nathaniel Micklem
Unknown:
Mr. W. H. Jones
Unknown:
Dr. Harry Roberts
Unknown:
Miss Evelyn Underhill
Unknown:
Mr. Gerald Heard
Unknown:
Mr. T. S. Eliot

Regional Variations (4)

London Regional Programme

Regional Programme Northern

Sunday Orchestral Concerts-xxii

Regional Programme Midland

Daventry National Programme

Regional Programme Scotland

Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise
A Symphonic Cantata
The Words from the Holy Scripture
ISOBEL BAILLIE (Soprano)
FRANK TITTERTON (Tenor)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
(Chorus Master, STANFORD ROBINSON )
THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section D)
(Leader, ARTHUR CATTERALL )
Conductor, ADRIAN BOULT
THE ‘Hymn of Praise' is a sotting of the 55th Psalm, planned as a choral symphony, though not quite in tho manner adopted by Beethoven. Mendelssohn's idea was different. He appears to have been toying with a new construction, and to have sought to attain a kind of unity for the whole work by making use of what Berlioz had already called an Idee fixe, and what Wagner was soon to call a leit-motiv, that is, a leading phrase or motto.
He chose for his motto a splendid example, an ancient church mode, the sole function of whose few noble notes was to climb the scale with the slow dignity, the set, upward look of a Parsifal motive, Unhappily, Mendelssohn mis-handled it. He perverted its nature, and under his pen the noble tune is made to hop. The motto theme occurs frequently. It opens the first movement, opens also the second, and closes the whole work. However, the ' Hymn of Praise ' has some fine choral writing in it, and two or three solos of true Mendelssohnian beauty. The work is 'divided into two parts, a purely orchestral first part, and a choral second part, the latter movement being in some measure a re-statement, in terms of voices, of the former, the instrumental movement.
The ' Lobgesang,' together with another choral work, the ' Festgesang,' were composed to order for the Festival in commemoration of the invention of printing held at Leipzig in 1840. The first performance took place in Bach's old church, the Thomaskircho.

Contributors

Soprano:
Isobel Baillie
Tenor:
Frank Titterton
Chorus Master:
Stanford Robinson
Leader:
Arthur Catterall
Conductor:
Adrian Boult

Regional Programme London

About Regional Programme

Regional Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More