Programme Index

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The Cedric Sharpe Sextet first broadcast in September, 1931, and since that time its performances have been a popular and regular broadcast feature. The Cedric Sharpe Sextet has also appeared in several British films. The Sextet is so constituted that it is able to play any type of music other than jazz, and the personnel has been chosen primarily because of its experience in quartet playing.
The leader is Edwin Virgo , who plays second violin in the Virtuoso String Quartet. The second violin is Tate Gilder , who is second violin in the Spencer Dyke Quartet. The viola is Raymond Jeremy , who plays for both the Virtuoso and Kutcher Quartets. The 'cellist is, of course, Cedric Sharpe , who is principal 'cello of the London Symphony Orchestra and plays for both the Virtuoso and Spencer Dyke Quar tets. The second 'cello is John Moore of the Stratton Quartet, and the pianist Sidney Crooke , well known in various light music combinations.

Contributors

Unknown:
Cedric Sharpe
Unknown:
Cedric Sharpe Sextet
Unknown:
Edwin Virgo
Unknown:
Tate Gilder
Unknown:
Spencer Dyke
Unknown:
Raymond Jeremy
Unknown:
Cedric Sharpe
Unknown:
Spencer Dyke Quar
Unknown:
John Moore
Pianist:
Sidney Crooke

Running commentary on the finish of the race from the Isle of Man
Commentators
At the Grand Stand,
Alan Hess
At Douglas Bay Hotel corner,
Victor Smythe
Northern listeners will remember' that in the past there were two Manx races-the Mannin Moar (for big cars) and the Mannin Beg (for small ones). Last year, however, these were merged into a single event — the R.A.C. International Light Car Race. It is for cars up to 1,500 c.c. engine capacity, and is run over fifty laps of a four-mile circuit. It has been truly described as a ' round the houses ' event.
In this period listeners will hear the finish of the race. The start and a description of the race in the running were given on North at 1.45 and 3 p.m. respectively.

Contributors

Unknown:
Alan Hess
Unknown:
Victor Smythe
Unknown:
Mannin Moar

(June Edition)
Presented by Harold Ramsay from
The Union Cinema, Kingston
Roping in Hildegarde
Clapham and Dwyer
Beryl Orde
Hal Yates
Mr. Flotsam and Mr. Jetsam
Carroll Gibbons
The Eight Step-Sisters
Carroll and Howe
Sydney Torch
Robinson Cleaver
Phil Park and Harold Ramsay
Continuity and special lyrics by Phil Park
Produced by Leon Pollock
This is the third edition of Harold Ramsay 's popular ' Radio Rodeos '. The scene is set on a Mexican
Ranch and the local colour is as true to life as maybe, for Harold Ramsay actually owns one. Clapham and Dwyer have become a regular feature of the Rodeos; Beryl Orde is the well-known mimic ; Hal Yates is over here from America, and a great favourite and recording star in the States. With the world-famous American singer, Hildegarde, Mr. Flotsam and Mr. Jetsam, Carroll Gibbons , and Carroll and Howe, the programme is as strong as ever. The Eight Step-Sisters were, of course, the original dancers for BBC ' Music-Hails '.

Contributors

Presented By:
Harold Ramsay
Unknown:
Beryl Orde
Unknown:
Hal Yates
Unknown:
Carroll Gibbons
Unknown:
Robinson Cleaver
Unknown:
Phil Park
Unknown:
Harold Ramsay
Produced By:
Leon Pollock
Unknown:
Harold Ramsay
Unknown:
Harold Ramsay
Unknown:
Beryl Orde
Unknown:
Hal Yates
Unknown:
Carroll Gibbons

' Have we too many words? '
Leonora Lockhart
Natioh is isolated from nation by barriers due to the existence of more than 1,500 languages. One way of breaking these down is to use a simplified form of our own language with fewer words and far less complicated rules of grammar. Miss Lockhart is Assistant Director of the Orthological Institute, where she has worked for some years with C. K. Ogden. She will illustrate the talk with gramophone records.

Contributors

Unknown:
C. K. Ogden.

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More