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Regional Variations (2)

Regional Programme

National Programme Scotland

Interlude
2.5 Rural Science
' Food and the Empire '
B. A. KEEN , D.Sc., F.R.S.
2.25 Interlude
2.30 Songs from the Schools
This week, in place of the usual music lesson for schools, a special programme of songs has been arranged. Five school choirs will take part in this recital, and they will represent various districts of England and Wales. Thus, one choir will sing from London, another from Somerset, a third from Shropshire, a fourth from South Wales, and a fifth from Yorkshire.
Some of the songs included in the programme will be well known to most listeners; others are of interest as being typical of the regions in which the children live.

Contributors

Unknown:
B. A. Keen

Free Entertainment in London
Kevin Fitzgerald
'Nothing ', says Kevin Fitzgerald , ' is impossible or too fantastic in London ', and he is to talk about the entertainment that is to be had for nothing in the largest city in the world. There are the different people one meets on a bus journey, from the Cockney to the wedding guest in his silk hat. The remarks of the bus conductors, workmen, and errand boys are an entertainment in themselves...Mr. Fitzgerald will speak of the interest to be had in a visit to a street market, of the entertainment to be got out of one of the London parks on a sunny afternoon, and of the thrill of a fire-engine dashing through the West End or the City in the rush hour of the day. His talks are an entertainment in themselves, as those listeners know who heard his talk on ' The Lost Art of Staying at Home '.

Contributors

Unknown:
Kevin Fitzgerald
Unknown:
Kevin Fitzgerald

Produced by A. W. Hanson introduces to you some of the interesting people from different parts of the Empire who are in London for Coronation
Week
For the first time ' In Town Tonight', the most consistently popular entertainment that has ever been broadcast -so famous that the name of its organiser, A. W. Hanson , is almost as well known-is to be heard every night of the week with the exception of Wednesday, Coronation day. This evening (Monday), Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, from 7.40 to 8, and on Saturday, from 7.30 to 8.
Characteristic ' In Town Tonight ' people are to be brought to the microphone-but they will be people from the great towns and backwoods of the Dominions and Colonies, all on a Coronation visit to the home country. Each night, in addition, F. H. Grisewood will find someone or other in the crowd at some different point in London and interview him or her before a portable microphone, wherever they may be.

Contributors

Produced By:
A. W. Hanson
Unknown:
A. W. Hanson
Unknown:
F. H. Grisewood

by J. M. Barrie
Characters in order of speaking (By permission of London Film Productions Ltd.) (By permission of Gaumont-British Picture Corporation Ltd.)
The play adapted for broadcasting and produced by Val Gielgud
Not the least brilliant thing about Dear Brutus is the delightful and characteristic way in which Sir James Barrie wrote his stage directions, and these, by an inspiration of Val Gielgud 's, are not to be lost in the broadcast, for they are to be spoken by Lewis Casson.
The character of Lob is the pivot of the play. Whether he is fairy or mortal listeners may decide. It is said by the villagers that they remember him seventy years ago looking just as he does today. Is he Robin Goodfellow living on in Barrie's Midsummer Night's Dream? The part is to be taken by Richard Goolden , the 'little man', who almost suggests Lob. He played it, by the way, at Oxford with Fagen's Oxford Players, and incidentally, Val Gielgud played Dearth.
The part of Margaret has been portrayed by many charming actresses -Faith Celli (the original), Meggie Albanesi , Mary Casson , and Peggy Ashcroft. Now listeners are to hear Nova Pilbeam in this part of the delightful ' dream-child '. Listeners may remember her performance in Barrie's Peter Pan two years ago.
An article on the play, by Guy Fletcher , will be found on page 18.
' Dear Brutus ' will be repeated in the Regional programme tomorrow at 7.30

Contributors

Unknown:
J. M. Barrie
Produced By:
Val Gielgud
Unknown:
Sir James Barrie
Unknown:
Val Gielgud
Spoken By:
Lewis Casson.
Unknown:
Robin Goodfellow
Unknown:
Richard Goolden
Unknown:
Val Gielgud
Unknown:
Meggie Albanesi
Unknown:
Mary Casson
Unknown:
Peggy Ashcroft.
Unknown:
Nova Pilbeam
Unknown:
Peter Pan
Play By:
Guy Fletcher
Speaker:
Lewis Casson
Alice Dearth:
Margaretta Scott
Joanna Trout:
Doris Lytton
Mrs Coade:
Mabel Terry Lewis
Mabel Purdie:
Thea Holme
Lady Caroline Laney:
Sheila Borrett
Matey:
Henry Longhurst
Mr Purdie:
Jack Melford
Mr Coade:
A Bromley Davenport
Lob:
Richard Goolden
Will Dearth:
Milton Rosmer
Margaret:
Nova Pilbeam

The BBC Orchestra
(Section E)
Led by Laurance Turner
Conducted by Leslie Heward
Arthur Catterall (violin)
Tchaikovsky appears to have derived a great deal of pleasure from composing his Violin Concerto in D. In a letter to his publisher he said: 'I hit upon the idea quite accidentally, began to work at it, was completely carried away-and now the sketch is all but finished.' He dedicated it to Leopold Auer , but the latter failed to appreciate the work, so Tchaikovsky substituted the name of Adolph Brodsky , who performed it for the first time with the Vienna Philharmonic in 1881. Despite the melodiousness and brilliant showiness of the first and third movements, and the lyrical charm of the slow movement, the concerto was not a success, and many veers passed before it became generally popular.
Liszt's symphonic poem ' Les Preludes ' is based on Lamartine's
Méditations poétiques : 'What is life but a series of preludes to that unknown song whose initial solemn note is tolled by Death ? The enchanted dawn of every life is love; but where is the destiny on whose first delicious joys some storm does not break ?-a storm whose deadly blast disperses youth's illusions, whose fatal bolt consumes its altar. And what soul, thus cruelly bruised when the tempest rolls away seeks not to rest its memories in the calm of rural life ? Yet man allows himself not long to taste quietness that first attracted him to Nature's lap ; but when the trumpet gives the signal he hastens to danger's post, whatever be the fight which draws him to its lists, that in the strife he may once more regain full knowledge of himself and all his strength.'

Contributors

Unknown:
Laurance Turner
Conducted By:
Leslie Heward
Violin:
Arthur Catterall
Unknown:
Leopold Auer
Unknown:
Adolph Brodsky

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More