Programme Index

Discover 9,919,630 listings and 223,751 playable programmes from the BBC

Margaret Godley Rosalind Rowsell Gladys Winmill Doris Owens Bradbridge White Martin Boddey Stanley Riley
Samuel Dyson Conductor, Leslie Woodgate

Contributors

Unknown:
Margaret Godley
Unknown:
Rosalind Rowsell
Unknown:
Gladys Winmill
Unknown:
Doris Owens
Unknown:
Bradbridge White
Unknown:
Martin Boddey
Conductor:
Stanley Riley
Conductor:
Samuel Dyson
Conductor:
Leslie Woodgate

Lord Elton
Listeners will welcome back this popular broadcaster whose fine conversational style is well known to listeners. Hitherto, in ' Public Opinion and Politics ', broadcast in the summer of last year, and ' What is a great man ? ', which he gave in the autumn, Lord Elton has had to confine himself to fixed subjects. In this new series he will be able to talk about- anything he likes week by week. Politician, author, man of letters, Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford, Lord Elton can look back on a life full of interest and has almost unlimited experience of men and matters to draw on. He is just back from a visit to the United States, and doubtless his experiences out there will form the subject of one of his talks.

Contributors

Unknown:
Lord Elton

Leader, Harold Fairhurst
Conductor, Richard Austin
Solo pianoforte, Leslie England from the Pavilion, Bournemouth
Gogol's collection of short stories, ' Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka ', has been a fruitful source of inspiration to Russian opera composers. Mussorgsky's Fair at Sorotchintsy, Tchaikovsky's Vakula the Smith, Rimsky-Korsakov's Night in May and Christmas Eve-all these works are based on Gogol's delightful, humorous-fantastic tales of village life in the Ukraine.
A Night in May had been a favourite tale of Rimsky-Korsakov's from childhood ; he read it with his lady-love on the day he proposed to her ; and it was his wife who finally persuaded him to make an opera of it. The opera (written in 1878) was Korsakov's second and, as listeners will gather from the overture, is one of his most tuneful and lyrical compositions, by no means depending on orchestral colour for its effect. (Soloist, LESLIE ENGLAND> )

Contributors

Soloist:
Leslie England>

Trio for two Oboes and Cor Anglais in C, Op. 87
1 Allegro. 2 Adagio cantabile. 3 Minuetto: Allegro molto-Scherzo. 4 Finale: Presto played by Joy Boughton (oboe)
David John (oboe)
Nathalie Caine (cor anglais)

Contributors

Played By:
Joy Boughton
Oboe:
David John
Oboe:
Nathalie Caine

by James Tanner
[starring] Ben Lyon and W.H. Berry

(see below and the article by M. Willson Disher on page 8)

("The Quaker Girl" was broadcast on Tuesday in the Regional programme)

Contributors

Writer:
James Tanner
Producer:
John Watt
Lyricist:
Adrian Ross
Lyricist:
Percy Greenbank
Composer:
Lionel Monckton
Adapted for broadcasting by:
Henrick Ege
Tony Chute (Naval attaché at American Embassy, Paris):
Ben Lyon
Princess Mathilde (an exiled Bonapartist Princess):
Aileen Hynes
Captain Charteris (King's Messenger):
Gordon Little
Prudence (a Quaker Girl):
Wynne Ajello
Madame Blum (of the Maison Blum, Paris):
Violet Marquesita
Monsieur Larose (Chief of Police, Paris):
C. Dernier Warren
Monsieur Duhamel (Minister of State):
Brian Powley
Prince Carlo (affianced to Princess Mathilde):
Paul England
Jeremiah (a Quaker):
W.H. Berry
Phoebe (maid to Princess Mathilde):
Marjorie Browne
Diane (a Parisian Actress):
Yvette Darnac
Toinette (assistant at Maison Blum):
Dorothy Monkman
Musicians:
BBC Theatre Orchestra
Singers:
BBC Chorus
Conductor:
Mark H. Lubbock

' Sources of New Words '
Logan Pearsall Smith
In his talk today Logan Pearsall Smith, author of ' The English Language' and other publications, will show by what methods our language has been enriched. The first great source of new words has always been that of borrowing from other languages. English is a composite language, and almost half of its terms are derived from other forms of speech.

Contributors

Unknown:
Logan Pearsall Smith
Unknown:
Logan Pearsall

A programme of poetry
The poems selected and introduced by W. B. Yeats and read by Margot Ruddock and V. C. Clinton Baddeley
It seems to be the consensus of opinion among listeners that ' In the Poet's Pub ', selected and produced by W. B. Yeats , proved conclusively what he set out to prove-that poetry can still be popular, even in England, when it is made exciting. The poems presented on that occasion might be summarised as being the poetry of the people. In tonight's sequel, ' In the Poet's Parlour ', the poems might be classified as being the kind that poets enjoy reading and writing. They are ' The King of China's Daughter ' by Edith Sitwell , ' Santorin ' by J. E. Flecker , and To Morfydd ' by Lionel Johnson , and also Yeats's own ( Sweet Dancer ', ' I am of Ireland ', ' Poem from the Japanese', and ( The Wicked Hawthorn Tree '.

Contributors

Introduced By:
W. B. Yeats
Read By:
Margot Ruddock
Unknown:
Clinton Baddeley
Duced By:
W. B. Yeats
Unknown:
Edith Sitwell
Unknown:
J. E. Flecker
Unknown:
Lionel Johnson

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More