Programme Index

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Leader, Harold Fairhurst
Conductor, Richard Austin
Solo pianoforte, Mark Hambourg from the Pavilion, Bournemouth
The numbering of Dvorak's Symphonies is a little misleading. Actually, his first three symphonies were written as early as 1874-75, but two of these were suppressed till after his death, while the third was issued only in a revised form as ' No. 3, Op. 76'. In the meantime Dvorak had produced his so-called First and Second' (really fourth and fifth) Symphonies, Op. 63 and 70. The Second Symphony in D minor was composed in 1883-85 for the Royal Philharmonic Society and Dvorak came to London to conduct the first performance in April, 1885. It is a magnificent work, a finer achievement than the far better-known Fourth and Fifth (' New World ') Symphonies, though its tragic nature will always stand in the way of its popularity.

Contributors

Pianoforte:
Mark Hambourg

The Radiobiography of EDITH DAY
Presented by Leslie Baily and Charles Brewer and Compered by the Playgoer
Robert Hale , Jose Collins , and Davy Burnaby were the subjects of the first three in this series of autobiographies of stage and screen stars ; and now comes Edith Day , whose story tells of a rocket-like rise to fame in America, then in 1920 a brilliant London debut in Irene, followed by a series of spectacular musical plays including Rose Marie , The Desert Song, and Show Boat. Excerpts from these and other shows will be heard in tonight's programme, with the assistance of: Billy Merson
Clarice Hardwicke
Frederic Bentley
Michael Cole
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar F. G. Day
Kate Lay
J. B. Rowe
MacDonald Parke
Ernest Sefton
Joan Miller
Victor Barbour-James
The BBC Revue Chorus and BBC Theatre Orchestra
Conducted by Mark H. Lubbock
Interesting pictures illustrating the career of Edith Day will be found on page 11
'Star - Gazing' will be broadcast again at 9.0 tomorrow in the Regional programme

Contributors

Presented By:
Leslie Baily
Presented By:
Charles Brewer
Unknown:
Robert Hale
Unknown:
Jose Collins
Unknown:
Davy Burnaby
Unknown:
Edith Day
Unknown:
Rose Marie
Unknown:
Billy Merson
Unknown:
Clarice Hardwicke
Unknown:
Frederic Bentley
Unknown:
Michael Cole
Unknown:
J. B. Rowe
Unknown:
MacDonald Parke
Unknown:
Ernest Sefton
Unknown:
Joan Miller
Unknown:
Victor Barbour-James
Conducted By:
Mark H. Lubbock

The Need for New Words
Allan Ferguson
In this the second talk of the series, the speaker will ask if there has ever been an age in our history that has seen so rapid an extension of the vocabulary of our language-so many new words born, so many old words diverted to new meanings. He will point out how new movements, new ways of thought and feeling, advances in science, pure and applied, the cinema, motor-car, aviation, broadcasting-all these developments make heavy and increasing demands on the resources of our language. Does it adapt itself readily to these varied needs?

Contributors

Unknown:
Allan Ferguson

An Episode in the life of Napoleon
Written for broadcasting by Anthony Ellis
Production by Peter Creswell
Characters
Guests at the Reception, etc.
< His Father's Sword' was broadcast in the Regional programme on Tuesday

Contributors

Broadcasting By:
Anthony Ellis
Production By:
Peter Creswell
Napoleon:
Terence de Marney
Josephine de Beauharnais:
Mary Hinton
Junot:
Robert Holmes
Barras:
Jack Allen
Eugenie de Beauharnais:
Gerald Campion
Madame Tallien:
Eileen Easton Smith
Madame Holstein:
Kathleen Boutall
Rigadeau:
Malcolm Graeme
Coachman:
David Bevan
Mayor:
Paul Vernon

Conducted by the Rev. W. H. Elliott
Organist, Reginald Goss-Custard from St. Michael's, Chester Square
The first Thursday-night service from St. Michael's, Chester Square , was broadcast on October 1, 1931, and has been a regular feature ever since. It has made Mr. Elliott indispensable to millions of listeners. The response to his invitation to attend a reunion meeting at the Royal Albert Hall last December was so overwhelming that the Hall had to be booked for a second night. In November he made a plea over the air for a League of Prayer for Peace, with the result that a Senior League was formed which has already 350,000 members, and a Junior League, consisting of 10,000 school-children, and all of them every day say a prayer written by Mr. Elliott. He is building a new clubhouse for the children of Pimlico which he hopes to complete at Michaelmas.

Contributors

Organist:
Rev. W. H. Elliott
Organist:
Reginald Goss-Custard
Unknown:
Chester Square
Unknown:
Albert Hall

Antonio Brosa (violin)
Solomon (pianoforte)
(First broadcast performance)
Composer, conductor, viola-player, Frank Bridge is one of the most gifted and most striking personalities in modern British music. At one time people used to think of him as an inhabitant of the austere world of chamber music, though it is a little difficult to connect his vital, exuberant personality with any form of austerity. It is true he began his career in that world, both as a performer and -composer. But he has also composed a number of orchestral works and numerous songs of high artistic value. Bridge now returns to his first love of chamber music, and it will be interesting to hear this evening a product of his maturity.

Contributors

Violin:
Antonio Brosa
Viola-Player:
Frank Bridge

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More