Programme Index

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Regional Variations (2)

National Programme

National Programme Scotland

BARNARD ELLINGER
' If some Monday morning, you make friends with Mrs. Olipole, you will learn something about economics ; not just the economics of Supply and Demand, but the economics of shoes and ships and sealing-wax, of blouses and bradawls and bloater-paste ! ' So wrote A. A. Thomson in his article last week.
Mrs. Olipole is a landlady. She is a mythical creation of Barnard Ellinger and, true to musicf-hall type, she is vastly interested in household economics. Luckily for listeners, she is confidential almost to the point of garrulity, and Barnard Ellinger invariably has an abundance of material to pick from when he comes to the microphone to repeat her words of wisdom.

Contributors

Unknown:
Barnard Ellinger
Unknown:
A. A. Thomson
Unknown:
Barnard Ellinger
Unknown:
Barnard Ellinger

Huberman (violin): Mazurka, Op.
26 (Zarzycki) ; La Capricieuse (Elgar)
Wilhelm Kempff : Moments musicals,
Op. 94, Nos. 3 and 4 (Schubert) ; Siciliana (from the Second Sonata for Flute) (Bach, arr. Kempff)
Emanuel Feuermann (violoncello) :
Minuet (Valensin) ; Waltz, Op. 34, No. 2 (Chopin) ; Serenata napoletana (Sgambati)

Contributors

Unknown:
Wilhelm Kempff
Unknown:
Emanuel Feuermann

The Practice and Science of Gardening-7
' The Cultivation of Fruit-trees '
F. W. Costin , N.D.H., F.R.H.S.
Today Mr. F. W. Costin is to talk about the growing of fruit-trees : apples, pears, plums, cherries ; and the selection of varieties for special purposes— late and early, eating and cooking. Listeners will hear about methods of planting both in the garden and orchard ; about cropping, spraying, manuring, and so forth.
As Mr. Costin is to talk to Schools next week about the pruning of fruit trees, listeners may care to ' get up ' the subject beforehand, and they can do so by listening on Friday evening. At
6.50 p.m. in the National programme they will hear a discussion on this very subject.
2.25 Interlude
2.30 Music, Course I
Introductory Lesson 4
' Crotchets and Minims and the Leading
Note'
ERNEST READ

Contributors

Unknown:
F. W. Costin
Unknown:
Mr. F. W. Costin

Regional Variations (2)

National Programme

National Programme Scotland

ANTONIA BUTLER (violoncello)
KATHLEEN MARKWELL (pianoforte)
Once upon a time really fine solo 'cellists were rare, but since the beginning of the present century the 'cello has come into its own, and virtuosos on the 'cello are almost as plentiful as those on the violin. One of the greatest teachers of the instrument was Julius Klengel , who was chief professor at the Leipzig Conservatorium. Many of the foremost 'cellists of today owe much to his influence. Antonia Butler , who is twenty-six years of age, studied under Klengel, and was also a student at the Paris Ecole Normale de Musique, where six years ago she won the highest award for solo playing.
Kathleen Markwell studied pianoforte and singing at the Royal College of Music. In addition to being a soloist, Miss Markwell has done a great deal of accompanying for well-known instrumentalists and singers. But chamber music is her chief interest, and she has latterly confined her activities to this style of music. Miss Markwell has appeared in joint recitals in Austria, Holland, and Belgium.

Contributors

Unknown:
Antonia Butler
Pianoforte:
Kathleen Markwell
Unknown:
Julius Klengel
Unknown:
Antonia Butler
Unknown:
Kathleen Markwell

The Complete Madrigals of Peter
Philips
(c. 1560—c. 1628)
THE B B C SINGERS (A)
Conducted by Sir RICHARD RUNCIMAN TERRY
I. Libro de Madrigaii a 6 voci (1596)
(concluded) (MS. edited by R. R. Terry )
Poi che voi non volete
Cantai mentre dispiacq'al mio bel sole
(2 parte) Resto qual huom ch'e dur'e aspra guerra lo son ferit' hai lasso
(Riposta) S'io t'ho ferito Ut re mi fa sol la

Contributors

Conducted By:
Sir Richard Runciman Terry
Edited By:
R. R. Terry

The Producer at Work
:-Studying the Dialogue
E. MARTIN BROWNE
This afternoon E. Martin Browne is to continue his outline of the duties of a play producer. Over-acting and stepping out of the character are common faults of the amateur actor, and listeners will be told how to avoid them. Advice, too, will be given on the best treatment of dialogue. To illustrate this talk, E. Martin Browne has arranged for a reading from John Van Druten 's play After All to be broadcast, both with and without pauses. Thus listeners will hear the dramatic value of a pause, and how the dramatic effect may be lost without one.
The excerpt will be taken from Act I,
Scene I. Henzie Raeburn will take the part of Phyl, and John Richmond that of Ralph. No doubt many listeners will find it helpful to read the scene beforehand.
The broadcast over, members of Discussion Groups can get together and argue out among themselves the various points dealt with. Is the play that deals with life more or less as it is of more value than romantic drama ? Or can't they be compared ? Does After All reflect life ? Whether or no, isn't the dialogue admirable ? In what particular places in the scene did Henzie Raeburn and John Talbot deliberately over-act or under-act their parts ? How many marks would a listener award Van Druten for humour ? Is humour essential in a play ?

Contributors

Unknown:
E. Martin Browne
Unknown:
E. Martin Browne
Unknown:
E. Martin Browne
Unknown:
John Van Druten
Unknown:
Scene I. Henzie Raeburn
Unknown:
John Richmond
Unknown:
Henzie Raeburn
Unknown:
John Talbot
Unknown:
Van Druten

(Section E)
Led by MARIE WILSON
Conducted by LESLIE HEWARD
Solo pianoforte,
JOHANNE STOCKMARR
King George I had formed the habit of attending certain masquerades on the Thames which, as a feature of those days, were organised usually on a subscription basis. On one occasion he expressed a wish that an aquatic concert might be planned on the same lines. There were initial difficulties with impresarios, who saw no profit in it for themselves, but, finally, Baron
Kilmanseck, Master of the King's '
Horse, put up the money. The concert was a great success; the river was crowded with barges, and afterwards there was a grand supper at Lord Ranelagh's house at Chelsea.
The King had already expressed high approval of the music composed specially for the occasion by the famous
Handel, first composer of the King's music, and commanded it to be repeated once before and once after supper.
Each performance took an hour, so that the King did not get back to St. James's till half-past four the next morning
This is an arrangement by Sir Hamilton Harty of some of the numbers from the complete Water Music. fohanne Stockmarr comes from Copenhagen, where she studied at the Conservatoire. Then she went to Paris and finally finished her studies under Franz Neruda , the brother of Lady Halle. Madame Stockmarr made her début in England with Lady Halle while on a European tour that included Sweden, Finland, and Germany.

Contributors

Unknown:
Marie Wilson
Conducted By:
Leslie Heward
Pianoforte:
Johanne Stockmarr
Unknown:
Sir Hamilton Harty
Unknown:
Franz Neruda

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More