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Regional Variations (2)

DANCE MUSIC

National Programme London

Tales of the Tower of London
X, ' The Escape of Sir John Oldeastle '
By L. DU GARDE PEACH
The Cast will include :
Bruce Belfrage ; FREDERICK Burtwell ; ANDREW Churchman ; EDWIN Ellis ; HARMAN Grisewood ; CYRIL NASH : RALPH DE Rohan ;
H. St. Barbe WEST

Contributors

Unknown:
Sir John Oldeastle
Unknown:
L. du Garde Peach
Unknown:
Bruce Belfrage
Unknown:
Frederick Burtwell
Unknown:
Andrew Churchman
Unknown:
Edwin Ellis
Unknown:
Harman Grisewood
Unknown:
Cyril Nash
Unknown:
Ralph de Rohan
Unknown:
H. St. Barbe West

Mrs. Sidney Webb, who has lately returned from a two months' visit to Russia., extending from the Gulf of Finland to the Sea of Azov, will describe the economic and constitutional basis of what may be regarded as a new type of civilization. Mrs. Webb stayed on the gigantic State farms, and went for a cure to a celebrated Caucasian Spa, now given up to 'rest houses' for trade unionists. She will deal in her talk tonight with the novel constitution of the U.S.S.R., its four blocks of mass organization, its exclusive membership, fanatical faith, stern discipline, and elaborate code of conduct, that makes it half political party, half religious order. She will explain, too, the Leninist League of Communist Youth, with its millions of members and its double aim of self-discipline and self-improvement, and personal initiative in the service of the community; concluding with a statement of the economic theory of the General Plan and the difficulties in the way of its fulfilment.

Contributors

Speaker:
Mrs. Sidney Webb [Beatrice Webb]

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S
HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
Haydn-Mozart
MIRIAM LICETTE
EGON PETRI
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin,
CHARLES WOODHOUSE )
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
WHETHER Haydn or his publishers gave the curious titles to the symphonies which some of them bear is not clear, but that Haydn was often up to some of his humorous tricks explains, at least, the origin of his titles. For example, three of the six symphonies known as the Paris Symphonies (of which this one is No. 2) have odd titles. There is the one called ' Queen of France,' evidently because it contains a little French arietta which Haydn knew as a favourite of Marie Antoinette when she was an Austrian Archduchess ; another known as the ' Bear ' has a heavy-footed time in it resembling a bear dance, as well as references to the hunting field. Regarding the title ' La Poule,' which might have references to a figure in a quadrille known as La Poule, or to the barn-yard fowl because of echoes of the farmyard to bo heard in the allegro and andante of the symphony, it is obviously a question of which came first, the hen or the farmyard. Therfe is still another suggested solution, and that is that there can be traced in the slow movement a passing allusion to a celebrated piece for the harpsichord by Rameau also entitled La Poule. However this may be, the work is spirited and jolly, typical of Haydn's mature period.
MOZART'S opera Figaro had been produced in Prague and the whole city had gone mad about it. Mozart thereupon paid Prague a visit, and his reception was such that it would seem too much could not be made of him. He promised them another opera, which presently turned out to be Don Giovanni. He also gave two concerts during his stay, at one of which this symphony, already composed three years before, was played. It was received with such tremendous enthusiasm that it has since been known as the Prague Symphony. In its maturity it is worthy to rank with the three last and greatest. It is in three movements only and scored for a comparatively small orchestra without clarinets and trombones. The whole work is bright in feeling, with a long slow movement packed full of beautiful melodies.

Contributors

Unknown:
Miriam Licette
Unknown:
Egon Petri
Violin:
Charles Woodhouse
Conducted By:
Sir Henry Wood
Unknown:
Marie Antoinette

After EDGAR ALLAN POE
' TN this No-man's land, that lies somewhere between fact and fancy, only the perilous explore. Those of you who prefer the friendly light of day should venture no further. For such a tale as we now must tell is assuredly not yours.' In these words Poe gives fair warning to the timid that the House of Usher is no place for them. But, for the perilous who delight in Poe's genius for mystery and horror, and in his power of treating the most fantastic imaginings with an exact analytic method, there is promise of thrilling entertainment in this version of the most famous of the ' tales of death.'

Contributors

Unknown:
Edgar Allan Poe

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More