Programme Index

Discover 9,969,916 listings and 226,356 playable programmes from the BBC

Mrs. V. M. MACDONALD
JUDGED either as letters or as a casual fragment of the past, Mrs. Mac Donald 's ' 'packet' should make excellent listening. The eighteenth century was rich in letter-writers with the innate gift of style. who had attained the true art of letter-writing, which is, in Jane Austen 's opinion, ' to,express on paper exactly what one would say to tho same person hy word of mouth.' This casual bundle may not reveal another Fanny Burney , but it is certain to give an enchanting glimpse of private lives in the age of reason.

Contributors

Unknown:
Mrs. V. M. MacDonald
Unknown:
Mrs. Mac Donald
Unknown:
Jane Austen
Unknown:
Fanny Burney

Regional Variations (2)

MR. HOWARD MARSHALL , cricket correspondent of The Daily Telegraph, and well-known to listeners for his broadcast running commentaries and eye-witness accounts of important games, Burns up the outstanding features of the bumper season that has just finished, and reviews the form and prospects of the sixteen players who make up the M.C.C. touring team for Australia. The official team has the unofficial approval of most of the paper experts behind it, as well as the dumb goodwill of the masses of cricket lovers in this country. It is the general opinion that the Selection Committee have done their work in a way that defies criticism, and have picked a team that in balance of youth and experience, captaincy, and strength in all departments of the game compare favourably with any that has in previous years represented English cricket in Australia.

Contributors

Unknown:
Mr. Howard Marshall

Conducted by CHARLES LEGGETT
ARNOLD MATTERS (Baritone)
TRISH song owes much to Sir Charles Stanford. I Most of the songs he wrote have an Irish tang ; this cycle of seven songs, for instance, is set to words by John Stevenson from ' Pat McCarty , his Rhymes,' a number of poems written in racy, idiomatic Irish dialect. Stanford was very happy with such words, and in collaboration with Alfred Percy Graves , the Irish poet, who wrote the words to ' Father O'Flynn,' he produced some of the best original songs that have ever come out of Ireland. Besides this he edited a great number of Irish folk-songs, dressing them with great skill and charm. His most notable contribution, however, to the literature of Irish folk-song is the famous ' Petrio Collection of Irish Music,' which contains hundreds of lovely Irish melodies collected from all sources.
WHEN Sullivan died in 1901 he left his last opera, The Emerald Isle, unfinished. Edward German was offered the commission to finish it, and so skilfully did he do his work that it is not easy for those who do not know to distinguish which of the music is Sullivan's and which is German's. Naturally, the next opera to be put on at the Savoy was one all hy German, Merrie England, and this work ranks in charm and merit equally with the rest of the Savoy repertory. The book was by Basil Hood and deals with the days of Queen Elizabeth. Following a long and successful run at the Savoy Theatre, it quickly reached the amateur stage, and there it stays and will stay as long as amateurs continue to love good music.
SIR GRANVILLE BANTOCK 'S many songs are justly popular. The majority of them are upon Eastern subjects set to music with an Eastern bias in the mariner that has enabled Bantock to set Fitzgerald's Omar Khayyam verses so characteristically.
PETER WARLOCK 'S outlook upon music was many-sided. The serious student in him led him to delve in the Elizabethan past, to edit the Fantasies of Purcell. and to enrich our repertory of re-discovered Tudor music ; his regard for robust English idiom led him to interest himself in folk-song revival; and occasionally the sturdy humour of the man produced a song which though admirably made, was more or less a prank perpetrated for the good of his soul.

Contributors

Conducted By:
Charles Leggett
Conducted By:
Arnold Matters
Unknown:
Sir Charles Stanford.
Unknown:
John Stevenson
Unknown:
Pat McCarty
Unknown:
Alfred Percy Graves
Unknown:
Edward German
Unknown:
Basil Hood
Unknown:
Sir Granville Bantock
Unknown:
Omar Khayyam
Unknown:
Peter Warlock

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More