Programme Index

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by MAURICE VINDEN
Relayed from ST. MARK'S, NORTH AUDLEY
STREET
EDWIN LEMARE 'S organ recitals at St.
Margaret's, Westminster, used to be quite a feature of musical life before the War, and he has since repeated his triumphs in America. Besides being an exceptionally brilliant player, a gifted improvisor, and a prolific composer of organ music, he has added to the repertory a number of transcriptions of orchestral works, in which practice he was one of the earliest in the field. And in another field—that of the cinema
-it is difficult to conceive what Young Love, Came the Dawn, and the silent film would have done without him. That engaging, sugar-coated little tune you all remember, and the one before that, and still another before that were all Lemare's if you had only known it.

Contributors

Unknown:
Maurice Vinden
Unknown:
North Audley
Unknown:
Edwin Lemare

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Lid.)
Beethoven
ODA SLOBODSKAYA
SOLOMON
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
ORCHESTRA
Overture, Leonora, No. 2
BEETHOVEN wrote in all four separate overtures for his opera Fidelio. Three of them are known by the title of Leonora, the heroine of the opera, and the fourth is called the Fidelio Overture. The one used on the production of the opera in 1805 in Vienna was Leonora No. 2, the one to be performed tonight. The actual production took place at an unfortunate time, for seven days before, on November 13, the French army had entered Vienna. Napoleon had taken up his quarters near the city, while the Austrian Emperor, followed by all the wealthy people, had deserted the city. These, of course, were just the people on whom Beethoven counted to fill his house, and so disappointing was the booking that the opera was withdrawn after three performances. At a meeting held later at Prince Lichnowsky's house, other reasons for its failure were put forward ; the music was too advanced, the opera was too long, and it was suggested Beethoven should cut it. He fought the proposal for six solid hours, and at the end agreed to cut three of the whole numbers. Subsequently, the libretto was revised, the opera was reduced from three acts to two, and another overture, Leonora No. 3, substituted for No. 2. In this form Fidelio was put on again the following year. For a time the receipts were good and the houses appreciative, but it was suddenly withdrawn as a result of a quarrel Beethoven had with the intendant of the theatre. There were no further performances for at least seven years after that.
ODA SLOBODSKAYA and Orchestra Scena and Aria, Ah !
Perfido SOLOMOX and Orchestra
Pianoforte Concerto No. 3 in C Minor
1. Allegro con brio; 2. Largo; 3. Rondo (Allegro)
ORCHESTRA
Symphony No. 4 in B Flat
1. Adagio, Allegro vivace : 2. Adagio ; 3. Minuet : Allegro vivace, Trio : Un poco meno allegro ; 4. Allegro ma non troppo
IT was held by a number of Beethoven's admirers that he had not had the best of good fortune with his opera Fidelio, and with the idea of compensating him for his disappointment, a concert was organized for his benefit. The subscriptions for the performance were gratifying, and it must be admitted that the subscribers were given very good value for their money. A new work, the Fourth Symphony, was to be performed, and as well, the First, the Second, and the Third (the long Eroica) were included. The performance of these four symphonies alone, without breaks, was calculated to take two and a half hours.

Contributors

Unknown:
Oda Slobodskaya
Conducted By:
Sir Henry Wood
Unknown:
Perfido Solomox

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN
9.55 Shipping Forecast
10.0 PARLIAMENT YESTERDAY AND TODAY —III
Major the Right Hon. WALTER ELLIOTT, M.P.: 'How the Machine Works'
THE procedure of the Imperial Parliament is the accumulated practice of over six hundred years, selected to meet the needs of changing times. As a result, the Parliamentary machine looks cumbrous, but it does work in a surprisingly efficient way, with close and constant safeguards against the dangers of hasty or irrevocable legislation, and with due preservation of the rights of the elected minority. Major Walter Elliott will explain the functions of each section of the Parliamentary machine; the importance of the Speaker, whose task it is to maintain order and decorum, to regulate questions, and generally to facilitate business; the system of legislation by Bill ; the difference between public and private Bills; the technique of divisions, amendments, adjournment; how and why the House goes 'into Committee'; the special and all-important procedure in matters affecting finance. All electors should know these, things, if only that they may correctly gauge the importance or otherwise of the selections of Parliamentary news that are given occasional and variable prominence in the Press.

Contributors

Unknown:
Walter Elliott
Unknown:
Major Walter Elliott

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More