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Conductor, Sir DAN GODFREY
JOHN DUNN (Violin)
From THE PAVILION, BOURNEMOUTH
NOT very many years ago most of the composers who wrote what [they called Spanish music lived in Paris and were very much like Sandy, the Laird of Cockpen. who, it will be remembered, ' sat in simple attire at his easel, painting at a lifelike little picture of a Spanish toreador serenading a lady of high degree (in broad daylight). He had never been to Spain, but he had a complete toreador's kit ... and he had hired the guitar.' When, at last, Sandy did go
*to Spain, and painted the real thing, his pictures ceased to have any sale.
So it has been with Spanish music. Until quite recently the only sort we had any use for was that written by composers who, like the Laird, had never been to Spain. That is now all changed ; Albeniz. Granados, Falla, and Turina have taught us to esteem the real music of an intensely musical race blessed with a folk tradition at least as rich as that of any country in Europe.

Contributors

Conductor:
Sir Dan Godfrey
Violin:
John Dunn

BEETHOVEN'S SONGS
Sung by GEORGE PARKER (Baritone)
Die Ehre Gottes (The Glory of God) Busslied (Song of Penitence)
Mit einem gemalten Band (With a coloured
Ribbon)
La Partenza (The Departure)
Das Glück der Freundschaft (The Joy of Friendship)
Die laute Klage (The cry from the Heart) An die Hoffnung (To Hope)

Contributors

Sung By:
George Parker

THIS is the second appearance before the microphone of Carson Robison and his Pioneer Hill-Billy Singers, who are well known to listeners in America, and have achieved instantaneous popularity in this country for their introduction of the folk-tunes of the American backwoodsmen. For the past nine years Mr. Carson Robison , himself an ex-cowboy, has made a study of hill-billy songs, which are really the folk-songs of America ; and in addition to his collection of old traditional songs, lie has nearly two hundred of his own composition. Tonight he and his Pioneers will give further selections from their repertory.

Contributors

Unknown:
Carson Robison
Unknown:
Mr. Carson Robison

Relayed from The QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
Bach
DOROTHY SILK
ARTHUR CRANMER
CHARLES WOODHOUSE
ROBERT MURCHIE
FRANK ALMGILL
HAROLD SAMUEL
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
ROBERT MURCHIE , ALEC WHITTAKER , ERNEST HALL, CHARLES WOODHOUSE and Orchestra
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F, for Flute, Oboe, Trumpet, Violin and Strings
1. Allegro; 2. Andante ; 3. Allegro assai
AMONG the visitors at Carlsbad in the year 1718, or thereabouts, were the Markgraf, Christian Ludwig, of Brandenburg, and the rising young musician, Johann Sebastian Bach.
The Markgraf was a musical enthusiast, and had the odd habit of collecting concertos by famous living musicians. He was anxious to add Bach to his collection, and issued a command that some concertos should be written for him. Bach was obedient, or rather agreeable, took his time over the commission, and in due course sent his manuscripts, together with an opulent dedication in French, to the Markgraf at Brandenburg. Thus the famous six Brandenburg Concertos came into existence.
DOROTHY SILK and Orchestra
Recit., Tuo saver al tempo (Though young, thou art wise) (From Cantata No. 209)
Aria, Ricetti gramezza e pavento (Away with Melancholy), (Non sa che sia dolore) (Parting is deep Grief)
BACH was not only in charge of the music of the Thomaskirche in Leipzig, but he was also conductor of the Collegium Musicum, and was thus connected with the University. He was naturally a considerable musical figure in the city, and he was associated with most of the ceremonial functions at which music was played. The secular cantatas, therefore, were mostly written for occasions such as these, but while we know what most of them were for, this particular one, Non sa che sia, dolore, cannot be traced to any definite occasion. The text is just a flowery farewell to somebody, and as the words are in Italian, it is supposed to have been addressed to an artist returning to Italy.
HAROLD SAMUEL and Orchestra
Pianoforte Concerto No. 1 in D Minor
1. Allegro; 2. Adagio ; 3. Allegro
ARTHUR CRANMER and Orchestra
Then most blest all-quickening Day (Church Cantata, No. 70, Wachet, betet)
HAROLD SAMUEL and Orchestra
Pianoforte Concerto No. 5 in F Minor
1. Allegro; 2. Largo ; 3. Presto
CHARLES WOODHOUSE , ROBERT MURCHIE ,
FRAXK ALMOILL and Orchestra
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G for Violin, Two
Flutes and Strings
1. Allegro ; 2. Andanto ; 3. Presto
THE MARKGRAF OF BRANDENBURG having received the six priceless manuscripts known as the Brandenburg Concertos from Bach, added them immediately to his collection, forgetting to write to the composer acknowledging their receipt. He never had them performed; indeed, so little did he think of them that, on the sale of manuscripts at the Markgraf's death, the Brandenburg Concertos were included with several others in a job lot.
When Bach sent the manuscripts of his six concertos to Brandenburg he was wise enough. however, to retain a duplicate of each of them. If that had not been so they might have been altogether lost. As it was, Bach was able to perform them.
At that time, Bach, as Capellmeister to Prince Leopold, at Cothen, had the advantage of being able to rehearse his music with the Capelln. It was a friendly gathering, though all the musicians were servants of the Prince; he, by the way, often joined them, playing himself a viol da gamba. The Capelle, as the band was called, almost certainly, therefore, rehearsed and played the Brandenburg Concertos before they were heard elsewhere.
Bach was thirty-six when ho wrote these remarkable works, which were, in fact, his first essays in instrumental music on a symphonic scale.

Contributors

Unknown:
Dorothy Silk
Unknown:
Arthur Cranmer
Unknown:
Charles Woodhouse
Unknown:
Robert Murchie
Unknown:
Frank Almgill
Unknown:
Harold Samuel
Conducted By:
Sir Henry Wood
Conducted By:
Robert Murchie
Unknown:
Alec Whittaker
Unknown:
Ernest Hali
Unknown:
Charles Woodhouse
Unknown:
Christian Ludwig
Musician:
Johann Sebastian Bach.
Unknown:
Collegium Musicum
Unknown:
Harold Samuel
Unknown:
Arthur Cranmer
Unknown:
Harold Samuel
Unknown:
Charles Woodhouse
Unknown:
Robert Murchie
Unknown:
Fraxk Almoill

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More