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HAYDN PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by HELEN PERKIN
HAYDN wrote about fifty sonatas and divertimenti for the pianoforte.
Ho has himself declared that quite early in his career he was deeply influenced by the sonatas of Carl Philip Emanuel Bach, one of the sons of Johann Sebastian. He first came across these sonatas in the days when, having tried and failed to earn his living by playing the violin in a band of strolling players, he had borrowed some money and set himself up, happily enough, in an attic to compose. Up till then he had had no lessons at all in the art of composition, and this newly-published volume of C. P. E. Bach's must have made a very deep impression on him. In any case, we know that Haydn was not only to improve the structure of the then accepted sonata form, but that he was to adapt it to the symphony and the quartet, both of which owe their form and almost their substance to the genius of Haydn.
The pianoforte sonatas do not rank with his most important work, and vary a good deal in value amongst themselves. They are nevertheless good Haydn, and are marked clearly with hi's characteristics-his preference for simplification as against contrapuntal complexity; the good humour and gaiety he was always able to put into his compositions whenever he- pleased, and his very rich store of Haydnesque melody.

Contributors

Played By:
Helen Perkin
Unknown:
Johann Sebastian.

IVOR DENNIS
Piano Solos
RITA BRUNSTROM
Impressions
THE WESTERN BROTHERS
(KENNETH and GEORGE)
FLORENCE DESMOND
Impersonations
TWO PAIRS CLAUDE HULBERT
PAUL ENGLAND ENID TREVOR PAT PATERSON
RUDY STARITA
Vibraphone and Xylophone Solos
THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Directed by HENRY HALL
THE WIRELESS SINGERS will sing Traditional Folk Songs during the programme

Contributors

Piano:
Ivor Dennis
Unknown:
Rita Brunstrom
Unknown:
Florence Desmond
Unknown:
Claude Hulbert
Unknown:
Paul England
Unknown:
Enid Trevor
Unknown:
Pat Paterson
Unknown:
Rudy Starita
Directed By:
Henry Hall

From the Music of Franz Joseph Haydn
(1732-1809)
THE KOLISCH STRING QUARTET:
RUDOLF KOLISCH (Violin); FELIX KHUNER (Violin); EUGEN LEHNER (Viola);
BENAR HEIFETZ (Violoncello)
HAYDN wrote seventy-six string quartets during his lifetime. They range, in order, from his first composition, Op. 1, No. 1, to his last, unfinished, Op. 103, in such sequence as to make it clear he must a]most always have had the writing of a quartet either in hand or in contemplation. As a matter of fact, he cut his teeth as a composer practically on the String Quartet. In the days when he was studying hard from the few books which came his way-the sonatas of C. P. E. Bach and Fux's' Gradusad Pamassum ,' he wrote, in order to gain experience, at least a dozen quartets. This was many years before he entered the household of Prince Esterhazy, under whose protection he was to produce most of the best work of his life. At the same time, these early quartets were by no means merely student's compositions. They became, in fact, very popular, and contributed to the fame which Haydn quite early in his life enjoyed, and which was to increase as he grew older and his compositions were more spread about the Continent, till he was everywhere acknowledged as the first composer in Europe.
Quartet in D (Op. 64, No. 5) (The Lark)
Allegro moderato ; Adagio cantabile ; Menuetto, Allegretto ; Finale, Vivace
THE quartets to be performed tonight are all amongst the last twenty or so, and naturally they show Haydn in his last and best stage of maturity. This quartet in D is one of six quartets, and is the most popular of the set. It is called The Lark, because in tho opening movement, the violin soars upward, trilling all the time. It also has a movement sometimes known as The Hornpipe.
Quartet in C (Op. 76, No. 3) (The Emperor)
Allegro ; Poco adagio cantabile; Menuetto, Allegro; Finale, Presto
THIS quartet, The Emperor, is so called because the last movement consists of a set of variations on Haydn's own arrangement of The Emperor's Hymn. It is not only one of the most popular of his quartets, but one of the most beautiful.
Quartet in B Flat (Op. 76, No. 4) (The Sunrise)
Allegro con spirito; Adagio; Menuetto, Allegro ; Finale, Allegro ma non troppo
THIS is the fourth in the same series of six, which includes The Emperor. They are acknowledged to be among the finest of all Haydn's quartets. This one is called The Sunrise because the opening bars seem somewhat musically to suggest sunlight soaring upwards. It is by no means impossible that Haydn had some such idea in his mind. He has said that when he was composing, he used deliberately to tell himself little tales, which he would proceed to illustrate in the simplest way, by the formation of notea and melodies, almost as a child, given a pencil and piece of paper, and having the last story told to him in his head, would do.

Contributors

Unknown:
Joseph Haydn
Violin:
Rudolf Kolisch
Violin:
Felix Khuner
Violin:
Eugen Lehner
Viola:
Benar Heifetz
Unknown:
Gradusad Pamassum

National Programme Daventry

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National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More