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('The Bat')'
(Johann Strauss )
Act I
THE COVENT GARDEN OPERA COMPANY
Relayed from THE OPERA HOUSE,
MANCHESTER
(From North Regional)
Act I — Eisenstein's House
Characters in order of appearance:
Conductor, ROBERT AINSWORTH
FULL of sparkling gaiety, instinct with the spirit of heedless youtli, Die Fiedcrmaus (The Bat) is such music as one looks for from the hand which gave us The Blue Danube. The story is the usual comic opera plot of dancing and flirtations, masks and disguises, in which the Bat himself, Dr. Falke, is the leading spirit. He has an old score to pay off against his friend the Baron Eisenstoin, and takes advantage of Eisenstein's having to go to prison for a week. But Falko persuades him to put that off until he has been to a ball being given by the Prince Orlofsky. Adele, too, the Baroness's chamber-maid, has an invitation to the ball, for which she begs leave of absence on the tearful plea that her dear aunt is very ill. Falke carries Eisenstein off-ostensibly to see him safely locked up—and in her husband's absence, Rosalinda, the Baroness, has a visit of condolence from Alfred, an old admirer and ' an irresistible tenor,' and while he is with her, the prison governor arrives to carry off Eisenstein. Alfred, to avoid compromising the Baroness, allows the governor to assume that he is Eisenstein, and goes off to prison in the Baron's stead.

Contributors

Unknown:
Johann Strauss
Conductor:
Robert Ainsworth
Alfred (a singing master):
Roy Devereux
Adele (Rosalinda's Maid):
Nora Gruhn
Rosalinda (Eisenstein's Wife):
Thea Philips
Gabriel von Eisenstein (a Gentleman of independent means):
Ben Williams
Blind (a Lawyer):
Frederick Davies
Fallce (a Notary):
Frank Sale
Frank (Governor of Gaol):
Percy Heming

Regional Variations (2)

Daventry National Programme

National Programme London

The eleventh of a series of 'surprise items' which has proved immensely popular. The principle is by now well known: you are introduced to two or three people in a railway compartment, who fall into conversation. You may learn their names in the course of the conversation or after: and they are usually distinguished people. This 'convention' - carried out realistically, to the extent of using train-noises from the sound-effects department - may claim to have solved many of the difficulties of the broadcast discussion. Subjects of such permanent and topical interest as war, the police, the younger generation, and the American point of view have been discussed by such eminent people as Julian Huxley, Miss Dorothy L. Sayers, Hilaire Belloc, Sir Maurice Amos, Lord Ponsonby, and E.M. Forster. So look out for something good tonight.

Contributors

Unknown:
Julian Huxley
Unknown:
Miss Dorothy L. Sayers
Unknown:
Hilaire Belloc.
Unknown:
Sir Maurice Amos
Unknown:
E. M. Forster.

The First Appearance in Vaudeville of the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA
Directed by HENRY HALL
THE CARLYLE COUSINS
(Syncopated Songs)
ALEXANDER AND MOSE
' Dark Subjects '
RONALD GOURLEY
(Entertainer)
HARRY TATE
(Comedian)
'THE WEEK'S VAUDEVILLE'
Not a Serious Review
By ASHLEY STERNE

Contributors

Directed By:
Henry Hall
Unknown:
Ronald Gourley
Unknown:
Harry Tate
Review By:
Ashley Sterne

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More