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Conductor, Sir DAN GODFREY
CARL FUCHS (Violoncello)
Relayed from THE PAVILION, BOURNEMOUTH
QAM HARTLEY BRAITHWAITE had his musical training at the Royal Academy of Music, London ; he held a scholarship there at the beginning of the present century. Best known as yet as composer for the pianoforte, he has, nevertheless, produced music in the larger forms which is worthy of an important place among that of his contemporaries.
This tone-poem received a Carnegie Award in 1923, and is published by the Carnegie Trustees in their Collection of Modem British Works.
CARL FUCHS , fine artist, great teacher, thorough musician, and most, lovable friend, is a 'collist of the old school in this, among other ways, that he knows the literature of his instrument, as the hurrying younger generation has no time to do. He can always tell his colleagues of music for the instrument which they ought to add to their repertoire, and, if they take his advice, they always find it wise. This afternoon he is playing such a concerto; unknown to the great public, it will be new to most present-day 'cellists, though they can bo sure in advance that Carl Fuchs would not play it unless it were musically worth while. Karl Eckert , pianist, violinist, and conductor, as well as composer, had completed an opera by the age of ten, and an oratorio at thirteen. Afterwards a pupil of Mendelssohn's, he held important conducting posts in many of the world's great opera houses. He died at Berlin in 1879. (Continued overleaf.)

Contributors

Conductor:
Sir Dan Godfrey
Conductor:
Carl Fuchs
Unknown:
Hartley Braithwaite
Unknown:
Carl Fuchs
Unknown:
Carl Fuchs
Pianist:
Karl Eckert

Dr. JOHN BAKER (University Demonstrator in Zoology, University Museum, Oxford): ' The Control of Development '
THIS evening Dr. John Baker outlines
-L a subject which has been enormously studied and developed in recent years, to the extent of revolutionizing older theories of heredity altogether. Mendel, the scientist responsible for the theory which, with modifications, holds today, died less than fifty years ago-in 1884. He was a monk and eventually Abbot in the Augustinian monastery at Brunn, in Moravia, and carried out his experiments on plants in the garden of the monastery. Dr. Baker will explain the applications of his theories of inheritance to man, and give some idea of the possibilities of what would be the sensational power of artificially determining the sex of children. Next week Professor Julian Huxley , the eminent biologist who opened the series, will close it with a summary of the position of man with regard to science and to reality.

Contributors

Unknown:
Dr. John Baker
Unknown:
Dr. John Baker
Unknown:
Professor Julian Huxley

National Programme Daventry

About National Programme

National Programme is a radio channel that started transmitting on the 9th March 1930 and ended on the 9th September 1939. It was replaced by BBC Home Service.

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More