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SCHUBERT'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by JAMES CHING
Grosse (Great) Sonata in B Flat, (4th
Movement)
Sonata, in E Flat, Op 122 {1st Movement)
THE last movement of this4great' Sonata, although the minor mode lends it some. thing of wistfulness, begins with a sprightly little tune which returns ever and anon, interrupted by more melodious song-like tunes.
NOT quite on so grand a scale as the B Flat Sonata, the Sonata in E Flat is, nevertheless, an important work, which would be regarded as long, were it not for the much greater length of some-of Schubert's other pieces. It begins very happily with a tune made of the common chord, and the second main theme has something whimsical in its character. The movement is built on the orthodox plan and the theme made of the common chord has alarge say in the working out and in the final section.

(Aubert)
Act I
Although the name of Louis Francois Marie Aubert is as yet hardly known in this country, his work has attracted considerable attention in France, where he is recognized not only as a gifted and original composer, but-as a teacher, critic, and writer on musical subjects, of more than ordinary distinction. He began his musical career as a treble with an exceptionally fine voice, and was a pupil of the Paris Conservatoire at a very early age. Already while in his teens, he was composing both sacred and secular music, and he was still a very young man when a fantasia of his for pianoforte and orchestra, played by his own master at the Colonne Concerts, in 1901, made it clear that hero was a new composer with a message of his own.
His fairy tale opera, The Blue Forest, was finished in 1910. Its rather delicate and elusive charm failed to enlist the interest of the Paris Opera, and it was in Boston, U.S.A., that it was first performed in 1913. The tale is made up of three of the best known fairy tales, 'Hop-o'-my-Thumb,' 'Red Riding Hood,' and 'The Sleeping Beauty.' Less obvious in its appeal than Humperdinck's 'Hansel and Gretel,' and without its folk-lore element, it caters none the less equally well for the young people who hear only three of their beloved stories presented with a new charm, and for the music lover who can realize something of the grace and delicacy of the score.
An article on the work, by Watson Lyle, the music critic, will be found by listeners in the Christmas number of Cassell's Magazine.

8.25 ' The Blue Forest'
By LOUIS AUBERT
A Fairy Opera in Three Acts
Libretto by JACQUES CHENEVIERE
English Translation by HERMANN KLEIN
Cast : Prince Charming ........ ANDREW CLAYTON
Ogre ........................ STUART
Hop-o'-My-Thumb's Father .... ROBERTSON
Hop-o'-My-Thumb .......... KATE WINTER
Red Riding Hood ....BARBARA PETT-FRASER
The Princess ................... INA SOUEZ
Fairy Queen ................ ELSIE GRIFFIN
The Fairy .................. WYNNE AJELLO
The Waitress............................ VlVENNE
Hop-o'-My-Thumb's Mother..................... CHATTERTON
Woman....................... J CHATTERTON
Baker's Wife......................
Child................. RISPAH GOODACRE
Red Riding Hood's Mother J
THE WIRELESS CHORUS Chorus-Master, STANFORD ROBINSON
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Leader, S. KNEALE KELLEY) Conducted by PERCY PITT

MOST British authors of any eminence have been to the United States. Some of them have been on lecture-tours, whirl. ing across the continent in fast trains and stopping off for a few hours here and there. Some have been to New York or Hollywood and nowhere else. But they have nearly all written about America as though they had lived there for years. In newspapers, magazines and books they have told us, with every appearance of authority, where America was going, what it was, why it was prosperous, and all the rest. Mr. H. M. Tomlinson has been to the U.S.A. more than once, and he has not always been there as the noted British author arriving, awaited by the reporters, at New York ; but he has not written a book about it. This distinction will lend at least the appeal of novelty to his talk tonight, though those who know his writings will need no such added appeal.

5XX Daventry

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This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More