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KING OF THE CASTLE
' Its Walls were of Jasper,' a Story by Kenneth Grahame
There will be music by the OLOF SEXTET
' The Invitation,' another Whimsical Story by RICHARD HUGHES , will be told
6.20 The Week's Work in the Garden, by the Royal Horticultural Society
6.30 TIME SIGNAL, GREENWICH ; WEATHER
FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

BEETHOVEN'S SONATAS FOR VIOLIN
AND PIANOFORTE
Played by ERNEST WHITFIELD and KENDAL TAYLOR
No. 9 (' Kreutzer ')—Last Movement
THE Last Movement is quick and jig-like. In tho First Main Tune the Piano supplies a part in similar rhythm to the Violin's vivacious melody. Immediately afterwards the positions are reversed. The Second Main Tune is in two parts-a flippant tune and a poetical one. The flippant one (in the Violin) is nearly related not only to the First Main Tune, but also to the prevailing tune of the First Movement. ' The contrasting poetical tune, lovingly treated, forms an effective contrast in an otherwise entirely brilliant movement.

THIS is the third talk in the series intended for younger, listeners, and it concludes the programme for April. Its subject is one that will appeal to very many boys between the ages of fourteen and eighteen, for unemployment is a very serious problem in these post-war days, and it is nbne too easy to find a job, quite apart from keeping it when once it has been found. Mr. Paterson, who was for so long identified with the Oxford and Bermondsey Club, knows all about conditions of employment, and in his book, 'Across the Bridges,' he showed an intimate and sympathetic knowledge of the life of boys in the poorer quarters of South London.

LAST week Miss Sackville-West began her description of travel in the wild lands of Syria and Persia, where modern methods of transport mingle incongruously with the traditional life of the East. Tonight she will continue her account, and listeners who heard her previous talks, as well as readers of ' Passenger to Teheran,' will make sure of not missing the conclusion of her tale.

Admirers of A.J. Alan's inimitable style (it has been so often called 'inimitable' that the word appears to be in danger of becoming a label like Mr. Chesterton's 'paradoxical' and Sir James Barrie's 'whimsical,' but it is equally impossible to avoid using it) have hailed the story that he will tell tonight as one of the most characteristic of all. They should take warning, however, that it is not advisable to attempt to follow tonight's telling of it in 'Good Evening, Everyone' (in which it appears), as it may prove to happen rather differently this time.

5XX Daventry

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More