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A Running Commentary on the Final of the King's Prize by C'apt. E. H. ROBINSON Relayed from the 1,000 Yards Range. Bisley Camp
THE King's Prize at Bisley is. quite strictly speaking. the ' blue riband ' of the world of marksmanship. It is to rifle-shooting what the Wimbledon Singles Championship is to lawn tennis ; what the Diamonds is to sculling: what the American Cup is to yacht-racing. Bisley brings together marksmen— picked marksmen-from all over the world, and the cream of them compete in the battle royal for the King's Prize. Its winner, one'may be certain, has attained the highest possible excellence of marksmanship. This afternoon the final of the King's Prize will be contested at Bisley. and the first news of the result, with an account of all the preceding events, will be broadcast by Captain E. H. Robinson , late R.A.F., who himself won the King's Prize in 1923.

by the Late GEORGE and WEEDON
GROSSMITH
Read by GEORGE GROSSMITH
BEGIN THE YEAR WITH AN
EXPECTED PROMOTION
AT THE OFFICE
I MAKE TWO GOOD JOKES LUPIN SPECULATES SUCCESSFULLY AND STARTS A PONY
TRAP
LUPIN INTRODUCES US TO
MR. MURRAY POSH
WE LOSE MONEY OVER LUPIN'S ADVICE AS TO INVESTMENTS,
SO DOES CUMMINGS
MARRIAGE OF DAISY MUTLAR
AND MURRAY POSH
THE DREAM OF MY LIFE
REALIZED

(Relayed from the Gaiety Theatre)

8.20 From the Gaiety Theatre
Written and Produced by Stanley Lupino and Arthur Rigby
Music by Hal Brody.
Lyrics by Desmond Carter
Additional Numbers by De Sylva, Brown, and Henderson, Billy Mayerl, Frank Eyton, and Leslie Sarony
Dances and Ensembles by Fred Lord
Harry Acres Orchestra with H. B. Hedley at the Piano

Characters in order of appearance in this excerpt:-
Roily Ryder (an artist) ...................... Laddie Cliff
Joyce Ryder (his bride) .................... Connie Emerald
Tommy Burden ....... Noel Cortland
Dinkie Maine .............................. Gilly Flower
Jerry Walker (a medical student) .............. Stanley Lupino
Inspector Hickman ...................... Walter E. Wallis
Jack Stanton (an art student) ...... Cyril Ritchard
Valerie St. Clair............................ Madge Elliott
Cyrus Watt (Jerry's uncle) .............. Arthur Rigby, Junr.
Nicholas Wich (Rolly's uncle) .............. Harry Wotton
Wills (a butler) .................................. Arty Ash
Maid...................................... Bubbles Brown
Junetta Martineze........................Dorothy Langley
Lord Luston .................................. Wyn Weaver

ACT I is in the Torquay studio of Roily Ryder (Laddie Cliff), who has just married Joyce (Connie Emerald) in spite of having been forbidden by his uncle, Nicholas Wich, to marry. On the other hand, Jerry Walker (Stanley Lupino) is being urged to marry Junetta against his wishes. Jack Stanton has impersonated Lord Luston to impress Valerie St. Clair (Madge Elliott).
The excerpt opens with a duet between Roily and Joyce - 'I'm on the crest of a wave,' followed by Jerry's dramatic arrival. Jack Stanton's entrance precedes his song, 'After the Girl,' and Valerie St. Clair arrives, and they finish this excerpt with a duet - 'You've made a difference to me.'

Act II opens in the Garden. The Uncles Wich and Watt have meanwhile arrived, and Roily, Jack, and Jerry sing 'Love Lies.' The real Lord Luston then complains of his treatment at Jerry's hands. Wills the butler says they are all driving him crazy, and the excerpt closes with Jerry's song, 'I lift up my finger.'

Directed by ALFRED BONDT
ALTHOUGH Johann Strauss , the younger gave names to most of his dance tunes, very few of them really mean anything, and this is no more descriptive of a night in Venice than of a night anywhere else.
The eldest son of Johann Strauss the elder, he succeeded his father in 1863 as music master of the Court Balls in Vienna. At that time he had already a great reputation as a bandmaster and as composer of light and sparkling music, some of which is clearly destined to take its place among the immortal master-pieces of all time.
The elder Johann was anxious that none of his sons should follow a musical career, and the younger Johann began life as a banker. But, like two of his brothers, who were also destined for other professions, he found the call of music too strong and made it abundantly clear that he had inherited a very large share of the family gifts.

2LO London

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More