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WE all hope to get some really hot weather one day, so it is as well to be prepared for it. This evening Miss Phoone Redington , who is Head of the Irish School of Domestic Economy, is to reveal the ' secrets attending the successful preparation of those uncooked suppers which are not least of the joys of a hot summer. Few things are gloomier than the eating of hot food on a hot evening, unless it be the cooking of hot food that precedes such a meal. From such blots on the fair surface of our holidays we can look with confidence to Miss Redington to deliver us.

MISCELLANEOUS PIANO WORKS BY MOZART
Played by ETHEL BARTLETT
Rondo in B Flat
Rondo in D
MOZART was an obliging composer, who could and would sit down at any moment and write a piece for a friend, or for some concert or other special occasion. Very many of his smaller works were composed in this way.
In 1786-7, near the end of his life, when he was living in Vienna, he wrote several Rondos, of yhich that in D is one. It has a little singularity, in that, instead of its first tune coming round again (it does so a good many times) in the same key, as was the custom, it appears in different keys, and so gives additional variety to the piece.

mONIGHT the author of 'A Passage to India,' one of the most widely-discussed novels since the war, is to tell of the architectural loveliness of the railway bridges crossing the Rhone and the Sa6ne at Lyons. Readers of Mr. Forster's novels, and his strangely-fascinating short stories, will know that he is an artist rarely accomplished in the use of words. Mr. Forster speaks to the artist and the would-be traveller rather than to the practical engineer or builder of bridges. But a subject which brings the listener into contact with the Lyons district, that combined centre of ancient, mediaeval, and modern civilisations, will contain something of interest to everyone.

2LO London

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This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More