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NEARLY all the serious action of the majority of Shakespeare's plays takes place in the castles, palaces and halls of great men. And his Duke of Athens, his Veronese lords and Danish courtiers, their ways, their language and their establishments are those of the Elizabethan aristocracy of his own England. In this talk Mr. Stobart and Miss Somerville will describe
the noble society of Shakespeare's time.

MOST people's feelings towards frogs and toads are fairly adequately typi6ed by the story of the boy who would ' larn 'im to be a toad.' Yet from the point of view of the naturalist, the frog, and even the envenom'd toad, are most interesting creatures, and Mr. Daglish has many interesting things to tell about them in his talk this afternoon.
(Picture on page 311.)

PATRICIA ROSSBOROUGH and IvoR DENNIS
(Syncopation on Two Pianos)
VIVIEN LAMBELET (Soprano)
REG PALMER (In Comedy)
Sketch:
'DISTANCE LENDS ENCHANTMENT ' by WAL PINK including
FRED DUFREZ
FLOREXCE MATTHEWS
PEGGIE ROBB-SMITH
HERBERT LUGG
THE BALAGANTSCHINA
(Russian Artists)
The B.B.C. DANCE
ORCHESTRA, personally conducted by JACK PAYNE

THIS is the third talk in the series in which such authorities as Sir Henry Hadow and Mr. Philip Snowden have already discussed the growing industrialization of the English country-side and the means of arresting it before we have entirely lost our woods and fields. Professor Trevelyan, who holds the Regius Chair of Modern History at Cambridge, is also prominent in connection with the activities of the National
Trust.

ACT II
(Relayed from the Royal Opera
House, Covent Garden)
TAXNHÄUSER is founded on an old German legend. Tannhauser is a thirteenth-century minstrel—a ' Minnesinger ' or ' Knight of Song.' Ho spends some time in dissipation" at tho Court of Venus, but presently grows tired of her enchantments. He returns to his fellow men, and learns that his old love, Elisabeth, niece of the Landgrave (or Prince) continues to mourn his absence.
The SECOND ACT takes place in the Hall of Song at the Castle of Wartburg. ELISABETH (Soprano) enters and greets the hall as the scene of Tannhauser's former, triumphs of song.
WOLFRAM (Baritone) brings Tann-' hauser (Tenor) to her ; she asks him where he has been, but ho replies evasively. He assures her of his love.
The LANDGRAVE (Bass) enters,' and tells Elisabeth that ho intends to make her hand tho mizo at the contest of song. Now the Knights and Ladies of the Court assemble to the famous March. The Landgrave addresses them, explaining that the subject of the minstrels' impromptu songs is to be ' The Nature of Lovo.' The Knights draw lots to decide who shall commence. Wolfram sings of noble and' spiritual love, but when Tannhauser's turn comes ho loses control of himself, and sings a wild song in praise of Venus. The Landgrave and the Knights are incensed, and would kill the impious Tannhauser, but Elisabeth begs them to spare him. j
At this point, from the valley are heard the voices of the pilgrims, on their way to Rome. The Landgrave enjoins the knight to go with them, and seek forgiveness of the Pope. The Act ends with Tannhauser's departure on his pilgrimage.

2LO London

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This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More