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(A chart illustrating points to which Miss Brand referred in her talk of last iveck will be found on page 467.)
CARPETS occupy a large place in the domestic budget, from which even the ' flat habit' has failed to oust them, and their Wear and tear gives many an anxious quarter of an hour to the person whose unpleasant lot it is to replace them when the ravages of many, feet can no longer be concealed. In this talk Miss Violet Brand , who has already told listeners how to make their clothes last longer, will give some practical hints for , postponing the evil day.

THE Elizabethan sea-dogs were a hardy and healthy breed, and much honoured in our history ; but they left us cursed with the moral horrors of theslave trade. In this talk Mr. Lambert will describe how, two centuries after Hawkins died, the moral standards' of the English people had progressed sufficiently to make possible Wilberforce's great Crusade.
He will tell the story of the first attempts to interest Parliament in the abolition question ; of the first motion for gradual abolition followed by a long series of defeats in the Commons and the Lords, extending from 1795 to 1807, when success was finally achieved. And, in addition, he will discuss the question whether credit can be awarded to Wilberforce for his zeal on behalf of the African slaves, without blame also being given to him for his blindness to the almost equally hideous sufferings of the industrial population at home.

A Musical Play Book by ARTHUR MILLER
Lyrics by ARTHUR STANLEY
Music by EMMERICH KALMAN
Arranged and abridged for Broadcasting
THE WIRELESS CHORUS and the WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOHN ANSELL

Characters in order of speaking:
Niblo (the Cabaret Manager) ............ MURRI MONCRIEFF
Sylva (the Cabaret Star) ........................ MAGGIE TEYTE
Count Feri ....................................... LESLIE SARONY
Lord Boniface ....................................... EWART SCOTT
Prince Ronald .................................... PAUL ENGLAND
Eugene (his Cousin) ERIC DERWENT
Nitch ................................................ FRANK DENTON
Prince Cozonac (Prince Ronald's Father) ROBERT CHIGNELL
Princess Anita (his Wife) ..................... MIRIAM FERRIS
Countess Stasi DOROTHY MONKMAN
Act I. 'The Purple Kitten ' Cabaret Act II. Reception Hall, Prince Cozonac's House Act III. ' The Purple Kitten,' Winter Garden

That strange romantic country that lies somewhere between Ruritania and Bohemia is the true home of musical comedy; and it is here that the loves and laughs of The Gypsy Princess take place. Theatre-goers who saw the show at the Prince of Wales's Theatre in 1921 will not need reminding of the story, but for the benefit of new-comers, it may be summarized thus:- Prince Cozonac does not approve of actresses, so when his son, Prince Ronald, falls in love with Sylva, a cabaret star, their matrimonial prospects do not appear to be particularly bright; However, after a series of misunderstandings, the lovers are united. Incidentally, Prince Cozonac's snobbery receives a knock-out blow when he discovers that his wife, Anita, was once a vaudeville artist.

DOROTHY, LADY KENNARD
' Through Russia to Persia before the War '
READERS of that great Vic. torian traveller, Frederick Brunsby , the author of ' A Rido to Khiva,' will know something of the difficulties and even dangers of journeying in the vast spaces of Asiatic Russia half-a-eentury ago. Dorothy, Lady Kennard's travels took place more recently than that, but even in those pre-war days of which she speaks the railway stopped short at Batburh, and much of her travelling was done on the roads. Those who want to learn how journeys are made in countries that are still in the post-chaise and diligence stage of transport will do well to listen to her talk to-night.

2LO London

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This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More