Programme Index

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In this, the last of her series of talks, Professor Cullis will sum up the ideas that she has tried to expound; how general physical and mental efficiency may be attained, in the course of the ordinary daily round, by paying attention to such elementary things as eating and drinking, breathing and the allocation of one's work. It now remains for those who have listened with interest to these talks to put into practice the precepts that they have heard.

rpHK World Economic Conference organized by the League of Nations has just concluded, and decisions of great importance have been made at Geneva. 'Listeners will remember the talk in which Mr. Walter Layton of T/;e bottom )'</. exptained the purpose and scope of the conference ; this evening Mr. Runciman wilt talk of what it has done. He himself was one of the Uritish detegates to Geneva—a position to which he was fully entitled, as, besides being an ex-President of the Board of Trade, he is one of the biggest industrialists and financiers in the country : a Director of the Westminster Bank, and a former President of the Chamber of Shipping and Chairman of the International Shipping Conference.

Contributors

Unknown:
Mr. Walter Lay

A Bright, breezy hour, introducing, by special permission of Andre Charlot, several of Philip Braham's numbers from this popular revue, with sketches by C.R. Wade, Marion Fawcett and William Rowe, featuring:
Florence McHugh
Lilian Harrison
Eva Sternroyd
Paul England
Cyril Nash
Philip Wade
Harold Clemence
The Wireless Chorus and Orchestra
Conducted by John Ansell

Contributors

Composer:
Philip Braham
Writer:
C.R. Wade
Writer:
Marion Fawcett
Writer:
William Rowe
Performer:
Florence McHugh
Performer:
Lilian Harrison
Performer:
Eva Sternroyd
Performer:
Paul England
Performer:
Cyril Nash
Performer:
Philip Wade
Performer:
Harold Clemence
Musicians:
The Wireless Chorus and Orchestra
Conductory:
John Ansell

2LO London

Appears in

About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More