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A PARTICULARLY sad feature of household work is that, however fatiguing it may be, it does not in the least follow that it constitutes exercise, from the point of view of health. For instance, standing all day over the wash-tub, enveloped in clouds of steam, may be thoroughly tiring, and yet leave the body without any health-giving exercise at all. In the .'ourth of her talks Dr. Cullis, who is Professor of Physiology in the University of London, will explain the distinction between work and exercise, and how they can be combined.

for the WILTSHIRE FLITCH
Relayed from
The Recreation Ground, Calne
Judge-F. A. WILSHIRE
Counsel for the Flitch and for tho Applicants:
F. E. METCALFE
W. F. LONG
R. E. PULLED
LESLIE PULLED
J. GUY HEAL
C. 0. GOUGH
Miss WILSHIRE end other eminent Counsel
Clerk of the Court—
B. SPACKMAN
And a Jury composed of local spinsters and bachelors

Contributors

Unknown:
B. Spackman

IN this talk Professor Weiss, the Professor of Botany at Manchester University, continues his account of plant life in its community aspect, the relations of plants with each other, and the way in which plant neighbours influence one another's development and habits. In the particular case of marsh and pond plants, about which he will talk today, their whole existence is conditioned by the struggle for air.

by Capt. D. SINCLAIR and Capt. F. L. BARNARD on FLYING BY WIRELESS
NOTHING has done more to make flying safe than wireless direction -finding by means of signals from the ground. In this dialogue two well-known pilots will show how it is done, from tho end of the Channel crossing to tho landing at London's air-port.

Contributors

Unknown:
Capt. D. Sinclair
Unknown:
Capt. F. L. Barnard

JUAN MANEN (Violin)
THE WIRELESS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.
Leader : S. KNEALE KELLEY
Conducted by GEORG SCHNEEVOIGT
(Picture on page 347)
LISZT had great ideas as to the power of music to interpret a poem or plot, and he invented the free form of the ' Symphonic Poem ' in which to express his ideas more flexibly, adapting the construction of the piece to the dramatic demands of his subject.
The poet Lamartine, in his Les Préludes, puts the question ' Is life anything but a series of Preludes to the song that Death begins ? ' Ho pictures the b!iss of Love, and the tempests of Lifo that wreck human happiness. The unhappy one takes refuge in quiet retirement, away from his fellow-men, but when the trumpet calls him to action he flings himself into the fight, finding in battle the full realization of his powers. Lamartine's poetic ideas appealed to Liszt, and in the Symphonic Poem which we are now going to hear he very graphically depicts ita scenes.

Contributors

Leader:
S. Kneale Kelley
Conducted By:
Georg Schneevoigt

(with musical illustrations)
Musical criticism has its rivalries, as have all the professions, but the title of doyen has been freely accorded by all its members to Mr. Herman Klein for several years now. He began his career as a musical journalist in 1875, and in the half-century since has been musical critic to some of the most important papers in England and America. He is a Past President of the Critics' Circle, and has described his long life in several books - notably 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London,' published in 1903, in which he gave his memories of the many great personalities in the world of music whom he met in the earlier part of his career.

Contributors

Speaker:
Mr. Herman Klein

The French Composer, Lalo, wrote this piece for the famous Spanish Violinist, Sarasate, whom some listeners will recollect hearing, for lie used to be a great favourite here twenty years ago.
The Spanish Symphony (which is really a Suite of pieces, not a Symphony in the usual meaning of the term) is Spanish music through a Frenchman's eyes - gay, debonair, polished and piquant.
There are in the complete work five separate Movements, well contrasted in spirit and style.
Sibelius, Finland's greatest Composer, has had remarkable recognition from his countrymen, but in this country we have heard all too little of his major works. Tho favourite Valse Triste is only a slight example of his skill. In such music as his Tone Poem Finlandia, the Kalevala Suite, and, best of all, in his seven symphonies, we find the real Sibelius, using national idioms and often deriving his rhythms from those of traditional Finnish folk-poems.
His First Symphony, written when he was thirty-four, is spacious and fairly lengthy. It has a large measure of the virility that is inherent in all this Composer's music.

Contributors

Unknown:
Valse Triste

2LO London

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More