Programme Index

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Jammin'
7/7. Panel show that combines comedy and rock 'n' roll. This final edition enlists the talents of Midge Ure and Tony Hawks.

1.30 Lloyd Cole Knew My Father
5/5. Pop and rock aficionados Andrew Collins, Stuart Maconie and David Ouantick present a cheeky take on the history of popular music and music journalism. (Repeated from Thursday)

Contributors

Unknown:
Midge Ure
Unknown:
Andrew Collins
Unknown:
Stuart Maconie
Unknown:
David Ouantick

Zoe Ball explores the craft of music sampling, in which hip-hop, pop and rock acts create new tracks using bits and pieces of existing recordings. Practitioners have included Norman Cook, Moby, Eminem and Beyonce, while James Brown, Chic, the Turtles and Dido figure among the sampled acts. The programme deconstructs several big-hit examples of the genre, including the Verve's Bitter Sweet Symphony (from a version of the Rolling Stones' The Last Time), the Sugababes' Freak Like Me (Gary Numan's Are "Friends" Electric?) and Robbie Williams's Millennium (John Barry 's You Only Live Twice). With input from Moby, Gary Numan, Lulu, Guy Chambers, Tom Robinson , Basement Jaxx, Anne Dudley, Andrew Loog Oldham and drummer Clyde Stubblefield.

You may not know the name Clyde Stubblefield but you'll certainly have heard his work, for he's the most sampled drummer in the world after years of recording with James Brown. Yet Clyde has never received a credit or a penny in royalties from this new use of his beats. In this engrossing and smartly edited documentary, Zoe Ball (above) asks if sampling (in which artists lift snatches of music or voice through to entire songs and mesh them into a new track) is creative borrowing or blatant theft. Moby believes music belongs to the people hence it's all up for grabs by anyone. Gary Numan says having your music sampled is complimentary but artists deserve to be paid. Music journalist Danny Ecclestone makes the best point of all though: rock 'n' roll stole everything from the blues and country and never paid a penny. Do rich white pop acts really have any right to complain if a hip-hop artist borrows a riff or two? (Jane Anderson, radio editor)

Contributors

Presenter:
Zoe Ball
Interviewee:
null Moby
Interviewee:
Gary Numan
Interviewee:
null Lulu
Interviewee:
Guy Chambers
Interviewee:
Tom Robinson
Interviewees:
Basement Jaxx
Interviewee:
Anne Dudley
Interviewee:
Andrew Loog Oldham
Interviewee:
Clyde Stubblefield
Interviewee:
Danny Ecclestone
Producer:
Lou Foley

BBC Radio 2

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About this data

This data is drawn from the Radio Times magazine between 1923 and 2009. It shows what was scheduled to be broadcast, meaning it was subject to change and may not be accurate. More